It's Raining Books Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
  1. $16.77 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Love Me Back

    Merritt Tierce 9780385538077

spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

Prime Times: Writers on Their Favorite TV Shows

Prime Times: Writers on Their Favorite TV Shows Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The literary mind and the boob tube are often thought to have little in common, but the two have been trysting in dimly lit rooms since television's earliest days. To prove the point, Doug Bauer asked a number of the finest writers of our time to reveal their own forays into a medium that has been called everything from a vast wasteland to the electronic dream machine of the global village. The results are surprising, passionate, very personal, and often downright hilarious. From Nora Ephron on The Mary Tyler Moore Show to Nick Hornby on The West Wing, Susan Cheever on Father Knows Best to Henry Louis Gates Jr. on Amos 'n' Andy, the full range of televised fare is captured — sitcoms and soaps, police dramas and reality TV, the very new and the very old, and the much criticized and denounced and the truly iconic and beloved.

Prime Times is an eclectic gathering of autobiography, memory, and blade-sharp observation, all bound by the common — and, after all, literary — experience of watching other people's lives while trying to understand one's own.

Review:

"Bauer (Prairie City, Iowa) creates a pop culture junkie's dream in this anthology of essays about television by many of today's most popular writers: Nick Hornby dissects the allure of The West Wing, Elizabeth McCracken hilariously confesses her adoration of America's Funniest Home Videos, Jill McCorkle waxes nostalgic about The Andy Griffith Show. Personal examination, program dissection, social commentary and mere recollection share the pages of this lighthearted yet uneven collection. The essays work best when they move beyond the show. Lloyd Schwartz credits his love of language to Burns and Allen. Gilligan's Island becomes a profound backdrop for Lan Samantha Chang's reminiscence of her own cultural isolation in Wisconsin. In contrast, Nora Ephron's paean to Mary Richards reveals little of the show or of Ephron, and James Alan McPherson's theoretical examination of Star Trek feels incongruous among the more compelling personal pieces. The biggest flaw is the assumption that readers know the programs discussed. Mark Leyner's take on Hawaii Five-O, for example, will baffle those who haven't seen the show. With the skill of the writers and the wealth of material, this book succeeds by doing what most literature hopes to discourage: it inspires the reader to put down the book and turn on the television. Forecast: A regional NPR campaign will boost awareness, and Three Rivers will simultaneously publish a paperback edition ($12.95 -8114-9)." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Better than most of the TV we watch....Good fun and a bit of pop cultural history, too." Booklist

Review:

"Prime Times may channel-surf too much for readers seeking some kind of sustained insight on our emotional and psychological connections to television. The rest of us, though, can settle down on the couch and enjoy flipping through the lineup." Boston Herald

Review:

"[I]diosyncratic, uneven, and intensely personal....Essays on Father Knows Best, The Big Valley, and other old TV shows offer a refreshing change from the usual writings of professional critics..." Library Journal

Synopsis:

Bauer asks a number of the finest writers to reveal their own forays into television, a medium that has been called everything from a vast wasteland to the electronic dream machine of the global village.

Synopsis:

The literary mind and the boob tube are often thought to have tittle in common, but the two have been trysting in dimly lit rooms since television's earliest days. To prove the point, Douglas Bauer asked a number of the finest writers of our time to reveal their own forays into a medium that has been called everything from a vast wasteland to the electronic dream machine of the global village. Who could resist knowing why Elizabeth McCracken loves "America's Funniest Home Videos'? How Douglas Rushkoff found himself "Lost in Space? How Mark Leyner recalls the action-packed "Hawaii Five-O? Why Phyllis Rose finds a tampered reality on "Survivor? What Henry Louis Gates Jr.'s take on "Amos 'n' Andy is? How Alan Lightman felt when he first entered "The Twilight Zone? "Prime Times is a kind of cultural mosaic of the past half century, an eclectic gathering of autobiography, memory, and blade-sharp observation, all bound up by the common--and after all, literary--experience of watching other people's lives while trying to understand one's own.

About the Author

Douglas Bauer has written for Esquire, The New York Times Magazine, Harper's, Playboy, and other national magazines. He is also the author of Prairie City, Iowa, a work of nonfiction, and three novels. He lives in Boston.

Table of Contents

The West Wing 3
America, America, this is you : a complete explanation of why, exactly, I am going on record as loving America's Funniest Home Videos 11
Days of Our Lives 17
The tribe has spoken : why I like Survivor 24
Father Knows Best 45
The great ones 52
The Andy Griffith Show 60
Beam me up, Scotty : Star Trek 67
Bring back Big Valley 81
The wound and the bow : Howard Cosell and Monday Night Football 90
Rob and Laura and the little garage 113
Like Robinson Crusoe 121
The Mary Tyler Moore Show 131
Infomercials 134
You are not alone : MST3K, Lost in Space, and the reality of science fiction 142
A life of danger 155
Prime times : Masterpiece Theatre 161
Dreamhouse 168
Hawaii Five-O 175
The Twilight Zone 187
The world in black and white 195
Amos 'n' Andy and civil rights on TV 202
Gracie and me 208

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400047543
Editor:
Bauer, Douglas
Other:
Bauer, Douglas
Editor:
Bauer, Douglas
Author:
Edited and with an Introduction by Douglas Bauer
Publisher:
Random House
Location:
New York
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Television - Guides & Reviews
Subject:
Television - History & Criticism
Subject:
Television programs
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series Volume:
4386-1
Publication Date:
August 2004
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.56x5.52x.86 in. .81 lbs.

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Media Studies

Prime Times: Writers on Their Favorite TV Shows
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 240 pages Crown Publishers - English 9781400047543 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Bauer (Prairie City, Iowa) creates a pop culture junkie's dream in this anthology of essays about television by many of today's most popular writers: Nick Hornby dissects the allure of The West Wing, Elizabeth McCracken hilariously confesses her adoration of America's Funniest Home Videos, Jill McCorkle waxes nostalgic about The Andy Griffith Show. Personal examination, program dissection, social commentary and mere recollection share the pages of this lighthearted yet uneven collection. The essays work best when they move beyond the show. Lloyd Schwartz credits his love of language to Burns and Allen. Gilligan's Island becomes a profound backdrop for Lan Samantha Chang's reminiscence of her own cultural isolation in Wisconsin. In contrast, Nora Ephron's paean to Mary Richards reveals little of the show or of Ephron, and James Alan McPherson's theoretical examination of Star Trek feels incongruous among the more compelling personal pieces. The biggest flaw is the assumption that readers know the programs discussed. Mark Leyner's take on Hawaii Five-O, for example, will baffle those who haven't seen the show. With the skill of the writers and the wealth of material, this book succeeds by doing what most literature hopes to discourage: it inspires the reader to put down the book and turn on the television. Forecast: A regional NPR campaign will boost awareness, and Three Rivers will simultaneously publish a paperback edition ($12.95 -8114-9)." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Better than most of the TV we watch....Good fun and a bit of pop cultural history, too."
"Review" by , "Prime Times may channel-surf too much for readers seeking some kind of sustained insight on our emotional and psychological connections to television. The rest of us, though, can settle down on the couch and enjoy flipping through the lineup."
"Review" by , "[I]diosyncratic, uneven, and intensely personal....Essays on Father Knows Best, The Big Valley, and other old TV shows offer a refreshing change from the usual writings of professional critics..."
"Synopsis" by , Bauer asks a number of the finest writers to reveal their own forays into television, a medium that has been called everything from a vast wasteland to the electronic dream machine of the global village.
"Synopsis" by , The literary mind and the boob tube are often thought to have tittle in common, but the two have been trysting in dimly lit rooms since television's earliest days. To prove the point, Douglas Bauer asked a number of the finest writers of our time to reveal their own forays into a medium that has been called everything from a vast wasteland to the electronic dream machine of the global village. Who could resist knowing why Elizabeth McCracken loves "America's Funniest Home Videos'? How Douglas Rushkoff found himself "Lost in Space? How Mark Leyner recalls the action-packed "Hawaii Five-O? Why Phyllis Rose finds a tampered reality on "Survivor? What Henry Louis Gates Jr.'s take on "Amos 'n' Andy is? How Alan Lightman felt when he first entered "The Twilight Zone? "Prime Times is a kind of cultural mosaic of the past half century, an eclectic gathering of autobiography, memory, and blade-sharp observation, all bound up by the common--and after all, literary--experience of watching other people's lives while trying to understand one's own.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.