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Rejuvenile: Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grown-Up

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Rejuvenile: Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grown-Up Cover

ISBN13: 9781400080885
ISBN10: 1400080886
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Once upon a time, boys and girls grew up and set aside childish things. Nowadays, moms and dads skateboard alongside their kids and download the latest pop-song ringtones. Captains of industry pose for the cover of BusinessWeek holding Super Soakers. The average age of video game players is twenty-nine and rising. Top chefs develop recipes for Easy-Bake Ovens. Disney World is the world's top adult vacation destination (that's adults without kids). And young people delay marriage and childbirth longer than ever in part to keep family obligations from interfering with their fun fun fun.

Christopher Noxon has coined a word for this new breed of grown-up: rejuveniles. And as a self-confessed rejuvenile, he's a sympathetic yet critical guide to this bright and shiny world of people who see growing up as winding down — exchanging a life of playful flexibility for anxious days tending lawns and mutual funds.

In Rejuvenile, Noxon explores the historical roots of today's rejuveniles (hint: all roads lead to Peter Pan), the toyification of practical devices (car cuteness is at an all-time high), and the new gospel of play. He talks to parents who love cartoons more than their children do, twenty-somethings who live happily with their parents, and grown-ups who evangelize on behalf of all-ages tag and Legos. And he takes on the Harrumphing Codgers, who see the rejuvenile as a threat to the social order.

Noxon tempers stories of his and others' rejuvenile tendencies with cautionary notes about lost souls whose taste for childish things is creepy at best. (Exhibit A: Michael Jackson.) On balance, though, he sees rejuveniles as optimists and capital-R Romantics, people drivenby a desire to hold on to the part of ourselves that feels the most genuinely human. We believe in play, in make believe, in learning, in naps. And in a time of deep uncertainty, we trust that this deeper, more adaptable part of ourselves is our best tool of survival.

Fresh and delightfully contrarian, Rejuvenile makes hilarious sense of this seismic culture change. It's essential reading not only for grown-ups who refuse to act their age, but for those who wish they would just grow up.

Review:

"I read Rejuvenile excitedly, eager to get to Noxon's conclusions, feeling over and over that he was describing something I sensed was there but hadn't quite put into words. An eye-opener." Ira Glass, host of public radio's This American Life

Review:

"Geezers wearing blue jeans and watching cartoons and playing videogames is not precisely what Bob Dylan had in mind....But as Christopher Noxon smartly and definitively explains, never-ending youthfulness that is...the enduring legacy of the Woodstock generation." Kurt Andersen, host of public radio's Studio 360 and author of Turn of the Century

Review:

"Rejuvenile is better than any book out there about play. It sweeps together stories of real people being true to their core selves. This is not a book for escapists; it is a book for curious open explorers looking to lead more effective, flexible, adaptive, vital, and still responsible lives." Stuart L. Brown, M.D., founder and president, the Institute for Play

About the Author

Christopher Noxon has written for The New York Times Magazine, Los Angeles Magazine, and Salon. He lives with his wife and three children in Los Angeles.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

patti ruben, August 16, 2006 (view all comments by patti ruben)
Christopher Noxon has invented a brilliant name for the millions of Americans that lovingly continue enjoying themselves within their childhood. A great way to see and free yourself from boredom. Thank you Mr. Noxon!
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cybernie, August 16, 2006 (view all comments by cybernie)
The image of childlike adults, enraptured by a game of tag, is at once compelling and disturbing. Disturbing, because it suggests that something central to our understanding of what it means to be grown-up has changed. Compelling for the very same reason. Are adults becoming more juvenile? Or is the institution of adulthood itself being rejuvenated? In coming up with the term "Rejuvenile," Noxon captures a fundamental ambiguity that has long characterized the "adult" approach to play. By clearly and entertainingly documenting the variety of ways in which adults are commiting themselves to play, he offers up the hope that some of us, at least, will be able to create a new understanding of maturity: more functional, and definitely more fun.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781400080885
Author:
Noxon, Christopher
Publisher:
Random House
Author:
Christopher Noxon
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Inner Child
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Publication Date:
June 2006
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
275
Dimensions:
8.52x5.98x.99 in. .94 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » American Studies » 80s to Present
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Rejuvenile: Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grown-Up Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.50 In Stock
Product details 275 pages Crown Publishers - English 9781400080885 Reviews:
"Review" by , "I read Rejuvenile excitedly, eager to get to Noxon's conclusions, feeling over and over that he was describing something I sensed was there but hadn't quite put into words. An eye-opener."
"Review" by , "Geezers wearing blue jeans and watching cartoons and playing videogames is not precisely what Bob Dylan had in mind....But as Christopher Noxon smartly and definitively explains, never-ending youthfulness that is...the enduring legacy of the Woodstock generation."
"Review" by , "Rejuvenile is better than any book out there about play. It sweeps together stories of real people being true to their core selves. This is not a book for escapists; it is a book for curious open explorers looking to lead more effective, flexible, adaptive, vital, and still responsible lives."
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