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The Trouble with Africa: Why Foreign Aid Isn't Working

by

The Trouble with Africa: Why Foreign Aid Isn't Working Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

After years of frustration at the stifling atmosphere of political correctness surrounding discussions of Africa, long time World Bank official Robert Calderisi speaks out. He boldly reveals how most of Africa's misfortunes are self-imposed, and why the world must now deal differently with the continent.

Here we learn that Africa has steadily lost markets by its own mismanagement, that even capitalist countries are anti-business, that African family values and fatalism are more destructive than tribalism, and that African leaders prey intentionally on Western guilt. Calderisi exposes the shortcomings of foreign aid and debt relief, and proposes his own radical solutions.

Drawing on thirty years of first hand experience, The Trouble with Africa highlights issues which have been ignored by Africa's leaders but have worried ordinary Africans, diplomats, academics, business leaders, aid workers, volunteers, and missionaries for a long time. It ripples with stories which only someone who has talked directly to African farmers--and heads of state--could recount.

Calderisi's aim is to move beyond the hand-wringing and finger-pointing which dominates most discussions of Africa. Instead, he suggests concrete steps which Africans and the world can take to liberate talent and enterprise on the continent.

Review:

"It isn't the legacy of the slave trade or colonialism, or the supposed inequities of globalization and world trade, that are to blame for Africa's travails, argues this stimulating contrarian essay. The author insists that Africa's problems are largely of its own making, the product of dictatorial, kleptocratic governments; rampant corruption; economic policies that hobble agriculture, discourage private investment and strangle new businesses with red tape; and a cultural fatalism that inures Africans to misery. Calderisi draws on his experience as a World Bank official in Africa, peppering his analysis with personal anecdotes about Africa's callous, venal officialdom and misguided economic policies. He offers a muted defense of World Bank policies, but also decries Western 'political correctness' in indulging Africa's dysfunctions and calls for a new tough-love approach to foreign aid. Assistance to most countries, he contends, should be cut in half and conditioned on thorough democratic reforms and strict oversight by Western donors; responsible governments — he lists Uganda, Ghana, Tanzania, Mozambique and Mali — should get a large increase in aid with few strings attached. Calderisi's focus on Africa's internal faults and his somewhat essentialist musings on the 'African character' will stir controversy, but his cogent argument is an important addition to the conversation over Africa's future." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Calderisi, whose long career in international development includes many years with the World Bank, brings his knowledge and experience of the countries of sub-Saharan Africa to this volume. Taking a hard look at the failed results of funding to develop these countries, Calderisi describes a frustrating history of opportunities lost, the stumbling block of cultural and political attitudes with regard to the West and the colonial past, and recommendations for the future.
Annotation 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

Calderisi, whose long career in international development includes many years with the World Bank, brings his knowledge and experience of the countries of sub-Saharan Africa to this volume. Taking a hard look at the failed results of funding to develop these countries, Calderisi describes a frustrating history of opportunities lost, the stumbling block of cultural and political attitudes with regard to the West and the colonial past, and recommendations for the future. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The World Bank's former spokesperson for Africa's controversial statement about who's to blame for the continent's problems

Synopsis:

While many complain that wealthy nations turn a cold shoulder to the poorest continent, Robert Calderisi exposes the startling degree to which Africa's problems come from within. He reveals the shortcomings of foreign aid and debt relief, and proposes his own radical solutions. Readers will be shocked to learn that Africa has steadily lost markets by its own mismanagement, that even capitalist countries are anti-business, that African family values and fatalism are more destructive than tribalism, and that African leaders prey intentionally on Western guilt. This urgent wake-up call is aimed at those who are critical of the U.S. and other rich countries for not "doing more to help." Coming from an outspoken high-level official, this is a message that will create intrigue and outrage and spark a timely debate.

Synopsis:

The World Bank's former spokesperson for Africa's controversial statement about who's to blame for the continent's problems

Synopsis:

< div> < div> The World Bank's former spokesperson for Africa's controversial statement about who's to blame for the continent's problems < /div> < /div>

About the Author

Robert Calderisi studied at the Universities of Montreal, Oxford, Sussex and London. A 1968 Rhodes Scholar, he first visited Africa in November 1975. He has had a thirty-year career in international development, principally at the World Bank, where he held several senior positions. From 1997 to 2000, he was the Banks international spokesperson on Africa. He has lived in France, the Ivory Coast, Tanzania, the United Kingdom, and the US. He is now a consultant and writer, splitting his time between Montreal and Paris.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781403971258
Author:
Caldersi, Robert
Publisher:
Palgrave MacMillan
Author:
Calderisi, Robert
Subject:
Social conditions
Subject:
Economic Conditions
Subject:
Economic assistance
Subject:
Development - General
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Africa - General
Subject:
Africa Economic conditions 1960-
Subject:
Africa Politics and government 1960-
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20060331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.15 x 6.12 x 0.63 in

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Related Subjects

Business » General
History and Social Science » Economics » Global Economics
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy

The Trouble with Africa: Why Foreign Aid Isn't Working Used Hardcover
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Product details 256 pages Palgrave MacMillan - English 9781403971258 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "It isn't the legacy of the slave trade or colonialism, or the supposed inequities of globalization and world trade, that are to blame for Africa's travails, argues this stimulating contrarian essay. The author insists that Africa's problems are largely of its own making, the product of dictatorial, kleptocratic governments; rampant corruption; economic policies that hobble agriculture, discourage private investment and strangle new businesses with red tape; and a cultural fatalism that inures Africans to misery. Calderisi draws on his experience as a World Bank official in Africa, peppering his analysis with personal anecdotes about Africa's callous, venal officialdom and misguided economic policies. He offers a muted defense of World Bank policies, but also decries Western 'political correctness' in indulging Africa's dysfunctions and calls for a new tough-love approach to foreign aid. Assistance to most countries, he contends, should be cut in half and conditioned on thorough democratic reforms and strict oversight by Western donors; responsible governments — he lists Uganda, Ghana, Tanzania, Mozambique and Mali — should get a large increase in aid with few strings attached. Calderisi's focus on Africa's internal faults and his somewhat essentialist musings on the 'African character' will stir controversy, but his cogent argument is an important addition to the conversation over Africa's future." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
The World Bank's former spokesperson for Africa's controversial statement about who's to blame for the continent's problems

"Synopsis" by , While many complain that wealthy nations turn a cold shoulder to the poorest continent, Robert Calderisi exposes the startling degree to which Africa's problems come from within. He reveals the shortcomings of foreign aid and debt relief, and proposes his own radical solutions. Readers will be shocked to learn that Africa has steadily lost markets by its own mismanagement, that even capitalist countries are anti-business, that African family values and fatalism are more destructive than tribalism, and that African leaders prey intentionally on Western guilt. This urgent wake-up call is aimed at those who are critical of the U.S. and other rich countries for not "doing more to help." Coming from an outspoken high-level official, this is a message that will create intrigue and outrage and spark a timely debate.
"Synopsis" by ,
The World Bank's former spokesperson for Africa's controversial statement about who's to blame for the continent's problems
"Synopsis" by , < div> < div> The World Bank's former spokesperson for Africa's controversial statement about who's to blame for the continent's problems < /div> < /div>
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