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3 Local Warehouse Abuse- Personal Stories

This title in other editions

The End of the World as We Know It: Scenes from a Life

by

The End of the World as We Know It: Scenes from a Life Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the tradition of Mary Karr's The Liars' Club and Rick Bragg's All Over but the Shoutin', Robert Goolrick has crafted a classic memoir of childhood and the secrets hidden in a heart that can't forget.

In the Goolrick home there was a law: Never talk about the family in the outside world, never reveal the slightest crack in the facade. In The End of the World as We Know It, the author takes us back to the seemingly idyllic world his father and mother created in their home in a small Southern college town, a world of gentle men and lovely ladies and cocktails and party dresses — a world being eroded by a family history of alcoholism. As Goolrick grew to be a man, his childhood held memories that would not let go, memories that held a secret that followed him wherever he went, defining and directing his days. Over time, the secret grew so big it threatened to rip the world apart. And then it did.

With devastating honesty and razor-sharp wit, he looks back with love, and with anger, at the parents who both created his world and destroyed it. As Lee Smith (author of On Agate Hill) observed, "Alcohol may be the real villain in this pain-permeated, exquisitely written memoir of a Virginia childhood — but it is also filled with absolutely dead-on social commentary of this very particular time and place. A brave, haunting, riveting book.

Review:

"Stunning... a dark, glimmering jewel of a book. There were moments when the language was so lush and clear and haunting that I was caught up short." Alison Smith

Review:

"Goolrick adeptly uses a slow, teasing way of revealing himself to the reader... The End of the World As We Know It is barbed and canny, with a sharp eye for the infliction of pain." The New York Times

Review:

"In this brutally painful remembrance of hard drinking, attempted suicide, and childhood trauma, first-time author Goolrick constructs a well-written, nonlinear narrative of his life... Goolrick's memory of the details of his childhood is impressive, as is the deep sense of sorrow...the story evokes. A courageous and successful work." People

Review:

"A moving, unflinchingly rendered story of how the past can haunt a life." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"[An] unnerving, elegantly crafted memoir....Morbidly funny." Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"A gifted writer['s]...memorable account of his terribly flawed family....Searing....It stays with you." USA Today

Review:

"A devastating debut memoir about a Southern childhood....The language is lush and poetic while never becoming purple. Goolrick is clearly a victim of his parents' brutal abuse, but he has broken out of the categories of 'victim' and 'survivor' to become a powerful truth-teller." Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Review:

"In this profoundly crushing yet redemptive memoir, Goolrick peels back his skin for the reader. Through gorgeous prose, he gradually discloses layer upon layer of deplorable abuse, and as the coating underneath becomes exposed, so too does an exquisitely sensitive soul, whose self-awareness is so uniquely well articulated, it would shock me if the reader's heart went unchanged." Amanda Stern, author of The Long Haul

Synopsis:

In the tradition of Rick Bragg's All Over but the Shoutin', Goolrick has crafted a classic memoir of childhood and the secrets a heart can't forget. With devastating honesty and razor-sharp wit, he looks back with love, and with anger, at the parents who both created his world and destroyed it.

Synopsis:

It was the 1950s, a time of calm, a time when all things were new and everything seemed possible. A few years before, a noble war had been won, and now life had returned to normal.

For one little boy, however, life had become anything but "normal."

To all appearances, he and his family lived an almost idyllic life. The father was a respected professor, the mother a witty and elegant lady, someone everyone loved. They were parents to three bright, smiling children: two boys and a girl. They lived on a sunny street in a small college town nestled neatly in a leafy valley. They gave parties, hosted picnics, went to church--just like their neighbors. To all appearances, their life seemed ideal. But it was, in fact, all appearances.

Lineage, tradition, making the right impression--these were matters of great importance, especially to the mother. But behind the facade this family had created lurked secrets so dark, so painful for this one little boy, that his life would never be the same.

It is through the eyes of that boy--a grown man now, revisiting that time--that we see this seemingly serene world and watch as it slowly comes completely and irrevocably undone.

Beautifully written, often humorous, sometimes sweet, ultimately shocking, this is a son's story of looking back with both love and anger at the parents who gave him life and then robbed him of it, who created his world and then destroyed it.

As author Lee Smith, who knew this world and this family, observed, "Alcohol may be the real villain in this pain-permeated, exquisitely written memoir of childhood--but it is also filled with absolutely dead-on social commentary of this very particular time and place. A brave, haunting, riveting book."

Synopsis:

In the Goolrick home there was a law: Never talk about the family in the outside world, never reveal the slightest crack in the facade. To all appearances, they lived an almost idyllic life. Two respected, charming parents everyone loved. Three bright, smiling children. A lovely home on a quiet street nestled in a small college town. But behind the facade this family had created lurked secrets so dark, so painful for one little boy, that his life would never be the same.

With devastating honesty and razor-sharp wit, Goolrick looks back at this seemingly serene time and at the parents who gave him life and then robbed him of it, who created his world and then destroyed it.

About the Author

Robert Goolrick worked for many years in advertising. He lives in New York City. This is his first book.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

marathongirl, December 1, 2012 (view all comments by marathongirl)
Dark. Sorrowful. Tortured. Sometimes I'm not sure how people can go on when they have had such horrible events happen to them. I can't help but think it's a miracle that Robert Goolrick is alive, let alone such an incredible writer. (He is the author of one of my favorite books: The Reliable Wife) For me, this was an incredibly hard memoir to read. Of course, that doesn't compare to Mr. Goolrick's agony in living through such trauma. Read this memoir for its inescapable honesty and heart wrenching tale of survival. It will strip you to the bone with its searing portrayal of a childhood lost and a man forever affected by brutality.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
dinkabird, September 9, 2009 (view all comments by dinkabird)
This book haunted me for weeks.

I have a son the same age as when Robert was when he was assaulted, and I can't stop reliving his torment. I ache and cry for the tiny boy that the author was. Also, I am a survivor, and I have many questions for him.
I saw his email address once and I can't find it now.

This was a beautiful yet very disturbing look at his life, and I will never, never forget him.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781565126022
Author:
Goolrick, Robert
Publisher:
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Abuse - General
Subject:
FAMILY and RELATIONSHIPS / Abuse / General
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Family & Relationships-Abuse - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20080431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
227
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Featured Titles » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Health and Self-Help » Abuse » Personal Stories
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Abuse
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Grief
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

The End of the World as We Know It: Scenes from a Life Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 227 pages Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill - English 9781565126022 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Stunning... a dark, glimmering jewel of a book. There were moments when the language was so lush and clear and haunting that I was caught up short."
"Review" by , "Goolrick adeptly uses a slow, teasing way of revealing himself to the reader... The End of the World As We Know It is barbed and canny, with a sharp eye for the infliction of pain."
"Review" by , "In this brutally painful remembrance of hard drinking, attempted suicide, and childhood trauma, first-time author Goolrick constructs a well-written, nonlinear narrative of his life... Goolrick's memory of the details of his childhood is impressive, as is the deep sense of sorrow...the story evokes. A courageous and successful work."
"Review" by , "A moving, unflinchingly rendered story of how the past can haunt a life."
"Review" by , "[An] unnerving, elegantly crafted memoir....Morbidly funny."
"Review" by , "A gifted writer['s]...memorable account of his terribly flawed family....Searing....It stays with you."
"Review" by , "A devastating debut memoir about a Southern childhood....The language is lush and poetic while never becoming purple. Goolrick is clearly a victim of his parents' brutal abuse, but he has broken out of the categories of 'victim' and 'survivor' to become a powerful truth-teller."
"Review" by , "In this profoundly crushing yet redemptive memoir, Goolrick peels back his skin for the reader. Through gorgeous prose, he gradually discloses layer upon layer of deplorable abuse, and as the coating underneath becomes exposed, so too does an exquisitely sensitive soul, whose self-awareness is so uniquely well articulated, it would shock me if the reader's heart went unchanged."
"Synopsis" by , In the tradition of Rick Bragg's All Over but the Shoutin', Goolrick has crafted a classic memoir of childhood and the secrets a heart can't forget. With devastating honesty and razor-sharp wit, he looks back with love, and with anger, at the parents who both created his world and destroyed it.
"Synopsis" by ,
It was the 1950s, a time of calm, a time when all things were new and everything seemed possible. A few years before, a noble war had been won, and now life had returned to normal.

For one little boy, however, life had become anything but "normal."

To all appearances, he and his family lived an almost idyllic life. The father was a respected professor, the mother a witty and elegant lady, someone everyone loved. They were parents to three bright, smiling children: two boys and a girl. They lived on a sunny street in a small college town nestled neatly in a leafy valley. They gave parties, hosted picnics, went to church--just like their neighbors. To all appearances, their life seemed ideal. But it was, in fact, all appearances.

Lineage, tradition, making the right impression--these were matters of great importance, especially to the mother. But behind the facade this family had created lurked secrets so dark, so painful for this one little boy, that his life would never be the same.

It is through the eyes of that boy--a grown man now, revisiting that time--that we see this seemingly serene world and watch as it slowly comes completely and irrevocably undone.

Beautifully written, often humorous, sometimes sweet, ultimately shocking, this is a son's story of looking back with both love and anger at the parents who gave him life and then robbed him of it, who created his world and then destroyed it.

As author Lee Smith, who knew this world and this family, observed, "Alcohol may be the real villain in this pain-permeated, exquisitely written memoir of childhood--but it is also filled with absolutely dead-on social commentary of this very particular time and place. A brave, haunting, riveting book."

"Synopsis" by , In the Goolrick home there was a law: Never talk about the family in the outside world, never reveal the slightest crack in the facade. To all appearances, they lived an almost idyllic life. Two respected, charming parents everyone loved. Three bright, smiling children. A lovely home on a quiet street nestled in a small college town. But behind the facade this family had created lurked secrets so dark, so painful for one little boy, that his life would never be the same.

With devastating honesty and razor-sharp wit, Goolrick looks back at this seemingly serene time and at the parents who gave him life and then robbed him of it, who created his world and then destroyed it.

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