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Blue Blood

by

Blue Blood Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The life of a New York City police officer, with the NYPD running through his veins: a highly anticipated nonfiction epic — destined to be a classic.

Blue Blood is a bona fide literary masterpiece, an important book about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Conlon's canvas is great and complicated — he is the product of generations involved in law enforcement, good cops and bad — and the story he tells is impossibly rich: it presents an anecdotal history of New York through its police force, and paints a vivid portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor. It is a story about fathers and sons, partners who become brothers, old ghosts and undying legacies. Here you will see terms like loyalty, commitment, and honor come alive, in action, on a daily basis. With brio and a thrilling literary style, Conlon depicts his life on the force — from his first days walking a beat in the South Bronx to his ascent to detective. The pace is relentless, the stories hypnotic, the scope nothing less than grand.

Edward Conlon is a son of the Bronx, who still lives and works there. His father was a police officer who left the NYPD to join the FBI. His uncle was a lifelong officer of the NYPD. His great grandfather was a crooked cop — a dandy who "carried the bag on Atlantic Avenue" — during the Tammany Hall era. Blue Blood brings together a gifted writer with a subject he owns: Conlon captures the exquisite detail, the hilarious exchange of dialogue, the tragic and the marvelous, experienced firsthand, day after day. He has the Irish gift of storytelling, an old-school delivery, a killer sense of irony, and a sentimental heart.

Conlon's father envisioned bigger things for his son, the Harvard graduate; but to Conlon, there is no greater job in the world. He answered the call. In the end, you know why he's a cop, why anyone becomes a cop. Without question, Blue Blood will be one of the most talked about and celebrated books of the year.

Review:

"This gripping account of his life in the NYPD by a Harvard-educated detective will evoke deserved comparisons to other true crime classics, like David Simon's Homicide and Kurt Eichenwald's The Informant. The son of an FBI agent, Conlon began his career patrolling housing projects in the Bronx before moving on to narcotics work and eventually getting his gold shield. He seamlessly weaves in family stories, autobiography and a history of corruption and reform in the legendary police force, but the heart of the book is his compelling and detailed rendering of the daily grind of the average policeman, a refreshing antidote to car chases and running gun fights that are a staple of popular culture's depiction. There are dozens of fascinating supporting characters on both sides of the law, including pitiful addicts and career criminals hoping to become informants, devoted public servants, good bosses and petty bureaucrats. The narrative spans the violent early 1990s, touches on the controversial Abner Louima and Amadou Diallo cases, and features an evocative account of the grim recovery at the Fresh Kills landfill, sifting through remains of the twin towers, where circling birds provided clues to human remains. Even those with a more cynical view of the realities of police work will be impressed by the warts-and-all portrait Conlon provides, and his gifts as a writer will doubtless attract a wide audience. Agent, Owen Laster at the William Morris Agency. (Apr. 12) Forecast: Conlon is already established as the author of the 'Cop Diary' pieces in the New Yorker, written under the pseudonym Marcus Laffey. A six-city author tour should help launch this one onto many bestseller lists." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"[M]ay be the best account ever written of life behind the badge....The amazing thing about Blue Blood is that where a lesser writer would just have gone numb, Conlon stays alive to the humor and the sadness and the ironies of life..." Lev Grossman, Time

Review:

"Blue Blood...may be the most candid and bestwritten true account ever of the joys and frustrations, sorrows and rewards of a cop's life....Conlon is a terrific writer..." Tom Nolan, The San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"A street-smart and hilarious memoir from Conlon....Conlon's prose, buffed to a high sheen, mixes the rich and rowdy dialogue of police and 'perps' with department lore....Crackling sharp — and utterly compelling." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"[S]prawling, wry, opinionated, beautifully written....Blue Blood, in terms of its ambition, its authenticity and the power of its writing, is in a class by itself." Ted Conover, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Conlon is a wonderful writer, street smart and poetic, arresting you with his deft turn of phrase....Readers are lucky Conlon gives them a pass into his world." Connie Fletcher, Booklist (Starred Review)

Review:

"[S]plendid....[A]n engrossing tale....[A] book that resonates with the shattering ring of truth....Considering its roots in raw fact...the book reads surprisingly like a novel. (Grade: A)" Ed McBain, Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"[W]ell-written....However, the book has some weaknesses. It is too long, and Conlon slips into police-speak too often....Yet, when Conlon returns to the central narrative of his story...he is at his best as a writer." Del Quentin Wilber, The Baltimore Sun

Review:

"These 500-plus pages sometimes run heavy with abbreviation, jargon and elliptical references; and Conlon is far more open with his head than his heart. Still, he admits us into a fascinating and frightening world that is never far from our own doorstep." Edward Morris, BookPage

Review:

"Det. Ed Conlon sets the bar for the true crime procedural and the cop memoir genres impossibly, unreachably high..." Anthony Bourdain, author of Kitchen Confidential

Review:

"Blue Blood is the most stunning memoir ever written about the cop world....You will never forget this superb book." Joseph Wambaugh, author of The Onion Field

Review:

"Growing up...my father admonished his kids to respect the police. This superb book reminds us why." Ken Auletta, author of Backstory: Inside the Business of News

Synopsis:

The excitement began from the moment of its acquisition in the fall of 1998, when major news organizations, including the New York Times, reported the sale of a book by the NYPD officer who wrote the "Cop's Diary" in The New Yorker, under the pseudonym Marcus Laffey. Now delivered, Blue Blood is a bona fide literary masterpiece, an important book about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Conlon's canvas is great and complicated — he is the product of generations involved in law enforcement, good cops and bad — and the story he tells is impossibly rich: it presents an anecdotal history of New York through its police force, and paints a vivid portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor.

Synopsis:

With brio and a thrilling literary style, Conlon depicts his life on the force — from his first days walking a beat in the South Bronx to his ascent to detective. The pace is relentless, the stories hypnotic, the scope nothing less than grand.

Synopsis:

"A great book... with the testimonial force equal to that of Michael Herr's Dispatches."—Time

Edward Conlon's Blue Blood is an ambitious and extraordinary work of nonfiction about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Told by a fourth generation NYPD, this is an anecdotal history of New York as experienced through its police force, and depicts a portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor. It is a story about police politics, fathers and sons, partners who become brothers, old ghosts and undying legacies.  Conlon joined the NYPD during the Giuliani administration, when New York City saw its crime rate plummet but also witnessed events that would alter the city, its inhabitants, and its police force forever: polarizing racial cases, the proliferation of the drug trade, and the events of September 11, 2001, and its aftermath. Conlon captures the detail of the landscape, the ironies and rhythms of natural speech, the tragic and the marvelous, firsthand, day after day. A New York Times Notable Book and Finalist for The National Book Criticics Circle Award for Nonfiction.

 

Synopsis:

Blue Blood is an work of nonfiction about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Edward Conlon is fourth generation NYPD - and the story he tells is an anecdotal history of New York through its police force, and depicts a portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor. It is a story about fathers and sons, partners who become brothers, old ghosts and undying legacies. Here you will see terms like loyalty, commitment, and honor come to life, in action, on a daily basis. Conlon depicts his life on the force - from his first days walking a beat in the South Bronx, to his ascent to detective." The book opens with Conlon's first day on patrol, but in fact his story begins in the time of his great-grandfather, an officer of dubious integrity who participated in the corruption that marked the Tammany-era NYPD as a corps in need of reform; it continues through the experience of Conlon's father, a World War II officer who left the ranks of the NYPD to become an FBI agent, and the years of his uncle, an old-fashioned, easygoing career cop, who stayed in uniform throughout the political upheavals and corrections of the 1960s and 1970s. Conlon joined the NYPD during the Giuliani administration, when New York City saw its crime rate plummet but also witnessed events that would alter the city and its inhabitants, and its police force, forever: polarizing racial cases, the proliferation of the drug trade, and the events of September 11, 2001, and its aftermath. Conlon captures the detail of the landscape, the ironies and rhythms of natural speech, the tragic and the marvelous, firsthand, day after day.

About the Author

Edward Conlon is a detective with the NYPD. A graduate of Harvard, he has published columns in The New Yorker under the byline Marcus Laffey.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781573222662
Author:
Conlon, Edward
Publisher:
Riverhead Trade
Location:
New York
Subject:
Police
Subject:
Regional Subjects - MidAtlantic
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Law Enforcement
Subject:
Specific Groups - General
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Child Care
Subject:
Parenting
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Series Volume:
no. 1997/090
Publication Date:
April 12, 2004
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
576
Dimensions:
925x1800
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
History and Social Science » Crime » Cops and Police Stories
History and Social Science » Crime » General

Blue Blood Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 576 pages Riverhead Books - English 9781573222662 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This gripping account of his life in the NYPD by a Harvard-educated detective will evoke deserved comparisons to other true crime classics, like David Simon's Homicide and Kurt Eichenwald's The Informant. The son of an FBI agent, Conlon began his career patrolling housing projects in the Bronx before moving on to narcotics work and eventually getting his gold shield. He seamlessly weaves in family stories, autobiography and a history of corruption and reform in the legendary police force, but the heart of the book is his compelling and detailed rendering of the daily grind of the average policeman, a refreshing antidote to car chases and running gun fights that are a staple of popular culture's depiction. There are dozens of fascinating supporting characters on both sides of the law, including pitiful addicts and career criminals hoping to become informants, devoted public servants, good bosses and petty bureaucrats. The narrative spans the violent early 1990s, touches on the controversial Abner Louima and Amadou Diallo cases, and features an evocative account of the grim recovery at the Fresh Kills landfill, sifting through remains of the twin towers, where circling birds provided clues to human remains. Even those with a more cynical view of the realities of police work will be impressed by the warts-and-all portrait Conlon provides, and his gifts as a writer will doubtless attract a wide audience. Agent, Owen Laster at the William Morris Agency. (Apr. 12) Forecast: Conlon is already established as the author of the 'Cop Diary' pieces in the New Yorker, written under the pseudonym Marcus Laffey. A six-city author tour should help launch this one onto many bestseller lists." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[M]ay be the best account ever written of life behind the badge....The amazing thing about Blue Blood is that where a lesser writer would just have gone numb, Conlon stays alive to the humor and the sadness and the ironies of life..."
"Review" by , "Blue Blood...may be the most candid and bestwritten true account ever of the joys and frustrations, sorrows and rewards of a cop's life....Conlon is a terrific writer..."
"Review" by , "A street-smart and hilarious memoir from Conlon....Conlon's prose, buffed to a high sheen, mixes the rich and rowdy dialogue of police and 'perps' with department lore....Crackling sharp — and utterly compelling."
"Review" by , "[S]prawling, wry, opinionated, beautifully written....Blue Blood, in terms of its ambition, its authenticity and the power of its writing, is in a class by itself."
"Review" by , "Conlon is a wonderful writer, street smart and poetic, arresting you with his deft turn of phrase....Readers are lucky Conlon gives them a pass into his world."
"Review" by , "[S]plendid....[A]n engrossing tale....[A] book that resonates with the shattering ring of truth....Considering its roots in raw fact...the book reads surprisingly like a novel. (Grade: A)"
"Review" by , "[W]ell-written....However, the book has some weaknesses. It is too long, and Conlon slips into police-speak too often....Yet, when Conlon returns to the central narrative of his story...he is at his best as a writer."
"Review" by , "These 500-plus pages sometimes run heavy with abbreviation, jargon and elliptical references; and Conlon is far more open with his head than his heart. Still, he admits us into a fascinating and frightening world that is never far from our own doorstep."
"Review" by , "Det. Ed Conlon sets the bar for the true crime procedural and the cop memoir genres impossibly, unreachably high..."
"Review" by , "Blue Blood is the most stunning memoir ever written about the cop world....You will never forget this superb book."
"Review" by , "Growing up...my father admonished his kids to respect the police. This superb book reminds us why."
"Synopsis" by , The excitement began from the moment of its acquisition in the fall of 1998, when major news organizations, including the New York Times, reported the sale of a book by the NYPD officer who wrote the "Cop's Diary" in The New Yorker, under the pseudonym Marcus Laffey. Now delivered, Blue Blood is a bona fide literary masterpiece, an important book about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Conlon's canvas is great and complicated — he is the product of generations involved in law enforcement, good cops and bad — and the story he tells is impossibly rich: it presents an anecdotal history of New York through its police force, and paints a vivid portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor.
"Synopsis" by , With brio and a thrilling literary style, Conlon depicts his life on the force — from his first days walking a beat in the South Bronx to his ascent to detective. The pace is relentless, the stories hypnotic, the scope nothing less than grand.
"Synopsis" by ,

"A great book... with the testimonial force equal to that of Michael Herr's Dispatches."—Time

Edward Conlon's Blue Blood is an ambitious and extraordinary work of nonfiction about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Told by a fourth generation NYPD, this is an anecdotal history of New York as experienced through its police force, and depicts a portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor. It is a story about police politics, fathers and sons, partners who become brothers, old ghosts and undying legacies.  Conlon joined the NYPD during the Giuliani administration, when New York City saw its crime rate plummet but also witnessed events that would alter the city, its inhabitants, and its police force forever: polarizing racial cases, the proliferation of the drug trade, and the events of September 11, 2001, and its aftermath. Conlon captures the detail of the landscape, the ironies and rhythms of natural speech, the tragic and the marvelous, firsthand, day after day. A New York Times Notable Book and Finalist for The National Book Criticics Circle Award for Nonfiction.

 

"Synopsis" by ,

Blue Blood is an work of nonfiction about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Edward Conlon is fourth generation NYPD - and the story he tells is an anecdotal history of New York through its police force, and depicts a portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor. It is a story about fathers and sons, partners who become brothers, old ghosts and undying legacies. Here you will see terms like loyalty, commitment, and honor come to life, in action, on a daily basis. Conlon depicts his life on the force - from his first days walking a beat in the South Bronx, to his ascent to detective." The book opens with Conlon's first day on patrol, but in fact his story begins in the time of his great-grandfather, an officer of dubious integrity who participated in the corruption that marked the Tammany-era NYPD as a corps in need of reform; it continues through the experience of Conlon's father, a World War II officer who left the ranks of the NYPD to become an FBI agent, and the years of his uncle, an old-fashioned, easygoing career cop, who stayed in uniform throughout the political upheavals and corrections of the 1960s and 1970s. Conlon joined the NYPD during the Giuliani administration, when New York City saw its crime rate plummet but also witnessed events that would alter the city and its inhabitants, and its police force, forever: polarizing racial cases, the proliferation of the drug trade, and the events of September 11, 2001, and its aftermath. Conlon captures the detail of the landscape, the ironies and rhythms of natural speech, the tragic and the marvelous, firsthand, day after day.

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