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Unequal Protection: The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights

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Unequal Protection: The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Unequal Protection

The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights

Was the Boston Tea Party the first WTO-style protest against transnational corporations? Did the Supreme Court sell out America's citizens in the nineteenth century, with consequences lasting to this day? Is there a way for American citizens to recover democracy of, by, and for the people?

Thom Hartmann takes on these most difficult questions and tells a startling story that will forever change your understanding of American history. He begins by uncovering an original eyewitness account of the Boston Tea Party and demonstrates that it was provoked not by "taxation without representation" as is commonly suggested but by the specific actions of the East India Company, which represented the commercial interests of the British elite.

Hartmann then describes the history of the Fourteenth Amendment-- created at the end of the Civil War to grant basic rights to freed slaves-- and how it has been used by lawyers representing corporate interests to extend additional rights to businesses far more frequently than to freed slaves. Prior to 1886, corporations were referred to in U. S. law as "artificial persons." But in 1886, after a series of cases brought by lawyers representing the expanding railroad interests, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations were "persons" and entitled to the same rights granted to people under the Bill of Rights. Since this ruling, America has lost the legal structures that allowed for people to control corporate behavior.

As a result, the largest transnational corporations fill a role today that has historically been filled by kings. They control most of the world's wealth and exert power over the lives of most of the world's citizens. Their CEOs are unapproachable and live lives of nearly unimaginable wealth and luxury. They've become the rudder that steers the ship of much human experience, and they're steering it by their prime value-- growth and profit at any expense-- a value that has become destructive for life on Earth. This new feudalism was not what our Founders-- Federalists and Democratic Republicans alike-- envisioned for America.

It's time for "we, the people" to take back our lives. Hartmann proposes specific legal remedies that could truly save the world from political, economic, and ecological disaster.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Thom Hartmann is an award-winning author of more than a dozen books, an international relief worker and psychotherapist, a former business and marketing consultant, and the founder and former CEO of seven corporations that have generated over a quarter-billion dollars in revenue. The father of three grown children, he lives in central Vermont with his wife, Louise.

Book News Annotation:

Hartmann is not trained as a historian, economist, or political scientist, but then he does not expect his readers to be either. He presents general readers an alternative story to the one they received growing up. To that end, he writes in the style of high school textbooks—difficult terms explained in parentheses, end notes not referenced from the text, and some simplification of historical and economic details. His fundamental message is that Americans have been fighting corporate power since the Boston Tea Party, and that even in these dark times it is possible to wrest rights back.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

"Unequal Protection"<BR>"The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights" <BR>Was the Boston Tea Party the first WTO-style protest against transnational corporations? Did the Supreme Court sell out America's citizens in the nineteenth century, with consequences lasting to this day? Is there a way for American citizens to recover democracy of, by, and for the people? <BR>Thom Hartmann takes on these most difficult questions and tells a startling story that will forever change your understanding of American history. He begins by uncovering an original eyewitness account of the Boston Tea Party and demonstrates that it was provoked not by "taxation without representation" as is commonly suggested but by the specific actions of the East India Company, which represented the commercial interests of the British elite. <BR>Hartmann then describes the history of the Fourteenth Amendment-- created at the end of the Civil War to grant basic rights to freed slaves-- and how it has been used by lawyers representing corporate interests to extend additional rights to businesses far more frequently than to freed slaves. Prior to 1886, corporations were referred to in U. S. law as "artificial persons." But in 1886, after a series of cases brought by lawyers representing the expanding railroad interests, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations were "persons" and entitled to the same rights granted to people under the Bill of Rights. Since this ruling, America has lost the legal structures that allowed for people to control corporate behavior. <BR>As a result, the largest transnational corporations fill a role today that has historically been filled by kings. They control most of theworld's wealth and exert power over the lives of most of the world's citizens. Their CEOs are unapproachable and live lives of nearly unimaginable wealth and luxury. They've become the rudder that steers the ship of much human experience, and they're steering it by their prime v

Synopsis:

Unequal taxes, unequal accountability for crime, unequal influence, unequal privacy, and unequal access to natural resources and our commons-- these inequalities and more are the effects of corporations winning the rights of persons while simultaneously being given the legal protections to avoid the responsibilities that come with these rights. Hartmann tells the intriguing story of how it got this way-- from the colonists' rebellion against the commercial interests of the British elite to the distorted application of the Fourteenth Amendment-- and how to get back to a government of, by, and for the people.

From Unequal Protection:

"...over the past two centuries, those playing the corporate game at the very highest levels seem to have won a victory for themselves-- a victory that is turning bitter in the mouths of many of the six billion humans on planet Earth. It's even turning bitter in unexpected ways for those who won it, as they find their own lives and families touched by an increasingly toxic environment, fragile and top-heavy economy, and hollow culture-- all traceable back to the frenetic systems of big business that resulted from the doctrine that corporations are persons."

About the Author

Thom Hartmann is an award-winning author of more than a dozen books, an international relief worker and psychotherapist, a former business and marketing consultant, and the founder and former CEO of seven corporations that have generated over a quarter-billion dollars in revenue. The father of three grown children, he lives in central Vermont with his wife, Louise.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781579546274
Subtitle:
The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights
Author:
Hartmann, Thom
Author:
Hartmann, Thom
Publisher:
Rodale Books
Location:
Emmaus, Penn.
Subject:
History
Subject:
Labor & Industrial Relations
Subject:
Business Ethics
Subject:
Corporations
Subject:
Human Rights
Subject:
Industrial policy
Subject:
Corporation law
Subject:
Business and politics
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Civil Rights
Subject:
Corporate & Business History - General
Subject:
Labor
Subject:
Industrial relations
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series Volume:
107-51
Publication Date:
20021004
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9.00 x 6.00 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » American Studies » Culture Wars
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Culture
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics

Unequal Protection: The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights Used Hardcover
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Product details 320 pages Rodale Press - English 9781579546274 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Unequal Protection"<BR>"The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights" <BR>Was the Boston Tea Party the first WTO-style protest against transnational corporations? Did the Supreme Court sell out America's citizens in the nineteenth century, with consequences lasting to this day? Is there a way for American citizens to recover democracy of, by, and for the people? <BR>Thom Hartmann takes on these most difficult questions and tells a startling story that will forever change your understanding of American history. He begins by uncovering an original eyewitness account of the Boston Tea Party and demonstrates that it was provoked not by "taxation without representation" as is commonly suggested but by the specific actions of the East India Company, which represented the commercial interests of the British elite. <BR>Hartmann then describes the history of the Fourteenth Amendment-- created at the end of the Civil War to grant basic rights to freed slaves-- and how it has been used by lawyers representing corporate interests to extend additional rights to businesses far more frequently than to freed slaves. Prior to 1886, corporations were referred to in U. S. law as "artificial persons." But in 1886, after a series of cases brought by lawyers representing the expanding railroad interests, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations were "persons" and entitled to the same rights granted to people under the Bill of Rights. Since this ruling, America has lost the legal structures that allowed for people to control corporate behavior. <BR>As a result, the largest transnational corporations fill a role today that has historically been filled by kings. They control most of theworld's wealth and exert power over the lives of most of the world's citizens. Their CEOs are unapproachable and live lives of nearly unimaginable wealth and luxury. They've become the rudder that steers the ship of much human experience, and they're steering it by their prime v
"Synopsis" by ,
Unequal taxes, unequal accountability for crime, unequal influence, unequal privacy, and unequal access to natural resources and our commons-- these inequalities and more are the effects of corporations winning the rights of persons while simultaneously being given the legal protections to avoid the responsibilities that come with these rights. Hartmann tells the intriguing story of how it got this way-- from the colonists' rebellion against the commercial interests of the British elite to the distorted application of the Fourteenth Amendment-- and how to get back to a government of, by, and for the people.

From Unequal Protection:

"...over the past two centuries, those playing the corporate game at the very highest levels seem to have won a victory for themselves-- a victory that is turning bitter in the mouths of many of the six billion humans on planet Earth. It's even turning bitter in unexpected ways for those who won it, as they find their own lives and families touched by an increasingly toxic environment, fragile and top-heavy economy, and hollow culture-- all traceable back to the frenetic systems of big business that resulted from the doctrine that corporations are persons."

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