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Cooking and Stealing: The Tin House Nonfiction Reader

by

Cooking and Stealing: The Tin House Nonfiction Reader Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Edited by the same team responsible for 2003's popular Tin House fiction anthology Bestial Noise, this selection of dazzling nonfiction encapsulates everything readers love about Tin House: the magazine's lively intelligence, wide-ranging curiosity, and sense of fun. Here is the best of the first twenty issues, including Jeffrey Eugenides on living above a Nazi bunker in Berlin, Jo Ann Beard on the life and death of one of Jack Kevorkian's last patients, Russell Banks on adapting novels to the screen, and Czeslaw Milosz on fellow poet Joseph Brodsky. Celebrating both Tin House's themed issues (Sex, Hollywood, Music, Lies) and the magazine's various regular departments — Readable Feasts, Pilgrimages, Lost and Found books — Cooking and Stealing gathers remarkable essays on diverse subjects from some of today's most compelling writers, confirming why the Village Voice has declared: "Tin House may very well represent the future of literary magazines."

Review:

"The literary journal Tin House is distinctive for showcasing work by luminary scribes as well as relative unknowns, and although the result can be uneven, it can also be charming. This second anthology provides a glimpse of what sets Tin House apart from other such journals. Standout essays include riffs by Rick Moody on Brian Eno; Jeffrey Eugenides on a Nazi bunker; Kathryn Harrison on lice; and Sallie Tisdale on writing about her family. The collection's title comes from Amy Bloom's essay about the two activities she enjoyed most with a beloved childhood friend. It's an apt choice to highlight, since Bloom captures Tin House's essence by blending humor, insight and a pinch of heartbreak, all within a few pages. The book's essays aren't grouped according to theme, resulting in a vague feeling of disorganization. However, this randomness highlights the range of topics covered. In Jean Nathan's 'The Lonely Doll,' the writer becomes obsessed with finding a children's book author and discovers a more bizarre and fascinating tale than she'd anticipated. Next comes Elissa Schappell's 'Sex and the Single Squirrel,' about people who find erotic satisfaction while dressed as animals. Subsequent essays address various topics, but nearly all have the same central core of self-reflection, observation and expert articulation. (Sept. 20)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Table of Contents

Charles d'Ambrosio, Introduction

Jean Nathan, The Lonely Doll

David Gates, Possum Living

Elissa Schappell, Sex and the Single Squirrel

Panagiotis Gianopoulos, Arachnophilia

Amy Bloom, Cooking and Stealing

Rick Moody, Fractal Love of Brian Eno

Jo Ann Beard, Undertaker Please Drive Slow

Kathryn Harrison, Nit-Pickers

Eliot Weinberger, The Laughing Fish

Francine Prose, A Train of Powder

Jeffrey Eugenides, The Bunker

Katie Roiphe, Graham Greene's Vietnam

Russell Banks, No, But I Saw the Movie

Abigail Thomas, The Magnificent Frigate Bird

David Shields, The Only Solution to the Soul Is the Senses: A Meditation on Bill Murray and Myself

Ann Hood, Little Audrey

Gerry Howard, The Mandarin and the Hipster

Richard McCann, 0The Resurrectionist

Lisa Zeidner, No Mo Po-No

Ken Tucker, Webb Pierce's "There Stands the Glass"

Sara Roahen, Drinking My Inheritance

Christopher Merrill, After You

Sallie Tisdale, Violation

Gary Greenberg, Little Brown Shack

Michael Lowenthal, You Don't See the Other Person Looking Back

Albert Mobilio, For Keeps: The Christian C. Sanderson Museum

Contributors

Copyright Notes

Product Details

ISBN:
9781582344867
Subtitle:
The Tin House Nonfiction Reader
Author:
Tin House
Author:
Tin, House
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Subject:
Essays
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20040920
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.28x5.60x1.03 in. .92 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Essays
Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » General
Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Readers from Magazines

Cooking and Stealing: The Tin House Nonfiction Reader Used Trade Paper
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Product details 320 pages Bloomsbury Publishing PLC - English 9781582344867 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The literary journal Tin House is distinctive for showcasing work by luminary scribes as well as relative unknowns, and although the result can be uneven, it can also be charming. This second anthology provides a glimpse of what sets Tin House apart from other such journals. Standout essays include riffs by Rick Moody on Brian Eno; Jeffrey Eugenides on a Nazi bunker; Kathryn Harrison on lice; and Sallie Tisdale on writing about her family. The collection's title comes from Amy Bloom's essay about the two activities she enjoyed most with a beloved childhood friend. It's an apt choice to highlight, since Bloom captures Tin House's essence by blending humor, insight and a pinch of heartbreak, all within a few pages. The book's essays aren't grouped according to theme, resulting in a vague feeling of disorganization. However, this randomness highlights the range of topics covered. In Jean Nathan's 'The Lonely Doll,' the writer becomes obsessed with finding a children's book author and discovers a more bizarre and fascinating tale than she'd anticipated. Next comes Elissa Schappell's 'Sex and the Single Squirrel,' about people who find erotic satisfaction while dressed as animals. Subsequent essays address various topics, but nearly all have the same central core of self-reflection, observation and expert articulation. (Sept. 20)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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