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The Right Nation: Conservative Power in America

by

The Right Nation: Conservative Power in America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Right Nation is not "for" liberals, and it's not "for" conservatives. It's for any of us who want to understand one of the most important forces shaping American life. How did America's government become so much more conservative in just a generation? Compared to Europe — or to America under Richard Nixon — even President Howard Dean would preside over a distinctly more conservative nation in many crucial respects: welfare is gone; the death penalty is deeply rooted; abortion is under siege; regulations are being rolled back; the pillars of New Deal liberalism are turning to sand.

Conservative positions have not prevailed everywhere, of course, but this book shows us why they've been so successfully advanced over such a broad front: because the battle has been waged by well-organized, shrewd, and committed troops who to some extent have been lucky in their enemies. John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, like modern-day Tocquevilles, have the perspective to see this vast subject in the round, unbeholden to forces on either side. They steer The Economist's coverage of the United States and have unrivaled access to resources and — because of the magazine's renown for iconoclasm and analytical rigor — have had open-door access wherever the book's research has led them. And it has led them everywhere: To reckon with the American right, you have to get out there where its centers are and understand the power flow among the brain trusts, the mouthpieces, the organizers, and the foot soldiers.

The authors write with wit and skewer whole herds of sacred cows, but they also bring empathy to bear on a subject that sees all too little of it. You won't recognize this America from the far-left's or the far-right's caricatures. Divided into three parts — history, anatomy, and prophecy — The Right Nation comes neither to bury the American conservative movement nor to praise it blindly but to understand it, in all its dimensions, as the most powerful and effective political movement of our age.

Review:

"In the introduction to this engaging study of American conservatism, Micklethwait and Wooldridge of the Economist disclaim any allegiance to America's 'two great political tribes.' It is this Tocquevillian quality of informed impartiality that makes their book so effective at conveying how profoundly the right has reshaped the American political landscape over the past half century. The authors trace the history of the conservative movement from the McCarthy era, when 'conservatism was a fringe idea,' to the second Bush administration and the 'victory of the right.' They dissect the new 'conservative establishment,' which combines the intellectual force of think tanks, business interest groups and sympathetic media outlets with the 'brawn' of 'footsoldiers' from the populist social conservative wing of the GOP, and argue that continuing Republican hegemony is likely. Democratic optimists who point to favorable demographic trends are exaggerating the liberalism of Latino and professional voters, say the authors, while other factors, such as suburbanization and terrorism, will tend to promote Republican values. Still, the right should be worried about its own 'capacity for extremism and intolerance' and about holding together its unlikely alliance of religious moralists and small-government activists. Even so, say the authors, conservative ideas are now so pervasive in American society that even a Kerry administration could do little to divert the country's long-term rightward drift. This epochal political transformation is rarely analyzed with the degree of dispassionate clarity that Micklethwait and Wooldridge bring to their penetrating analysis." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Echoing de Tocqueville's comment on the French Revolution, the authors (both of the Economist) believe that the conservative revolution that has taken over the United States over the past 50 years was "So inevitable and yet so completely unforeseen." They offer a portrait of the American right and an argument as to why the U.S. is more conservative in nature than comparable rich industrial democracies (and why it's going to stay that way). Central to their argument is the organizing power of the conservative movement and the movement is the primary character of their narrative. They describe the activities of the think tanks, the organizers, the spokespeople, and the rank and file activists and root their success in American exceptionalism.
Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

For anyone who wants to understand one of the most important forces shaping American life comes a book that attempts to understand the conservative movement — the most powerful and effective political movement of our age.

Synopsis:

and#147;It is not only the cause, but our manner of conducting it, that will establish character.and#8221;

and#151;John Dickinson, 1773

and#160;

A nation at war and widespread mistrust of the miland#173;itary. A financial crash and an endless economic crisis. A Congress so divided it barely functioned. Bitter partisan disputes over everything from taxaand#173;tion and the distribution of wealth to the role of banks and corporations in society. Welcome to the world of the Founding Fathers.

and#160;

According to most narratives of the American Revolution, the founders were united in their quest for independence and steadfast in their efforts to create a stable, effective government. But the birth of our republic was far more complicated than many realize. The Revolution was nearly derailed by extremists who wanted to do too much, too quickly and who refused to rest until they had remade American society. If not for a small circle of conservatives who kept radicalism in check and promoted capitalism, a strong military, and the preservation of tradition, our country would be vastly different today.

and#160;

In the first book to chronicle the critical role these men played in securing our freedom, David Lefer provides an insightful and gripping account of the birth of modern American conservatism and its impact on the earliest days of our nation.

and#160;

Among these founding conservatives were men like John Dickinson, who joined George Washingtonand#8217;s troops in a battle against the British on July 4, 1776, and that same week drafted the Articles of Confederation; James Wilson, a staunch free-market capitalist who defended his home against a mob of radicals demanding price controls and in the process averted a bloody American equivalent to Bastille Day; Silas Deane, who mixed patriotism with profit seeking while petitioning France to aid America; and Robert Morris, who financed the American Revolution and founded the first bank and the first modern multinational corporation in the United States.

and#160;

Drawing on years of archival research, Lefer shows how these and other determined founders chamand#173;pioned American freedom while staying faithful to their ideals. In the process, they not only helped defeat the British but also laid the groundwork for American capitalism to thrive.

and#160;

The Founding Conservatives is an intellectual advenand#173;ture story, full of gunfights and big ideas. It is also an extraordinary reminder of the punishing battles our predecessors fought to create and maintain the free and prosperous nation we know today.

Synopsis:

The untold story of a small group of founders who prevented radicalism at the dawn of the republic
 
A nation at war. A real estate crash and financial meltdown. Bitter partisan disputes over taxation, the distribution of wealth, and the role of banks and corporations in society. Welcome to the world of the founding fathers.
 
According to most narratives of the American Revolution, the founders were united in their vision. But according to historian David Lefer, political disagreements split the new nation in two. Had it not been for a few individuals who exercised a pragmatic conservatism that valued capitalism, a strong military, and the preservation of tradition, our country would be vastly different today.
 
Drawing on years of archival research, Lefer tells the untold story of how these men not only saved the Revolution but also helped define American conservatism and create the foundations for our economy. America’s first banks and corporations would not have been possible without the bold and idealistic efforts of the first conservatives.
 
This is more than just a fascinating story; it is also a new perspective on the birth of a free and prosperous nation.

About the Author

Both John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge were educated at Oxford and went on to work for The Economist. John Micklethwait has overseen the magazine's Los Angeles and New York bureaus and is now its U.S. editor. Adrian Wooldridge has served as West Coast correspondent, social-policy correspondent, and management editor, and is currently Washington, D.C., correspondent. Together, they have coauthored three books, The Witch Doctors, A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Hidden Promise of Globalisation, and The Company: A Short History of a Revolutionary Idea.

Both John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge were educated at Oxford and went on to work for The Economist. John Micklethwait has overseen the magazine's Los Angeles and New York bureaus and is now its U.S. editor. Adrian Wooldridge has served as West Coast correspondent, social-policy correspondent, and management editor, and is currently Washington, D.C., correspondent. Together, they have coauthored three books, The Witch Doctors, A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Hidden Promise of Globalisation, and The Company: A Short History of a Revolutionary Idea.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594200205
Subtitle:
Conservative Power in America
Other:
Micklethwait, John
Author:
Micklethwait, John
Author:
Wooldridge, Adrian
Author:
Lefer, David
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
General
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Conservatism & Liberalism
Subject:
United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Series Volume:
How a Group of Unsun
Publication Date:
20050531
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
8-page b/w photo insert; b/w maps on pag
Pages:
464
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » American Studies » Culture Wars
History and Social Science » Politics » Conservatism
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Culture

The Right Nation: Conservative Power in America Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$1.50 In Stock
Product details 464 pages Penguin Books - English 9781594200205 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In the introduction to this engaging study of American conservatism, Micklethwait and Wooldridge of the Economist disclaim any allegiance to America's 'two great political tribes.' It is this Tocquevillian quality of informed impartiality that makes their book so effective at conveying how profoundly the right has reshaped the American political landscape over the past half century. The authors trace the history of the conservative movement from the McCarthy era, when 'conservatism was a fringe idea,' to the second Bush administration and the 'victory of the right.' They dissect the new 'conservative establishment,' which combines the intellectual force of think tanks, business interest groups and sympathetic media outlets with the 'brawn' of 'footsoldiers' from the populist social conservative wing of the GOP, and argue that continuing Republican hegemony is likely. Democratic optimists who point to favorable demographic trends are exaggerating the liberalism of Latino and professional voters, say the authors, while other factors, such as suburbanization and terrorism, will tend to promote Republican values. Still, the right should be worried about its own 'capacity for extremism and intolerance' and about holding together its unlikely alliance of religious moralists and small-government activists. Even so, say the authors, conservative ideas are now so pervasive in American society that even a Kerry administration could do little to divert the country's long-term rightward drift. This epochal political transformation is rarely analyzed with the degree of dispassionate clarity that Micklethwait and Wooldridge bring to their penetrating analysis." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , For anyone who wants to understand one of the most important forces shaping American life comes a book that attempts to understand the conservative movement — the most powerful and effective political movement of our age.
"Synopsis" by ,
and#147;It is not only the cause, but our manner of conducting it, that will establish character.and#8221;

and#151;John Dickinson, 1773

and#160;

A nation at war and widespread mistrust of the miland#173;itary. A financial crash and an endless economic crisis. A Congress so divided it barely functioned. Bitter partisan disputes over everything from taxaand#173;tion and the distribution of wealth to the role of banks and corporations in society. Welcome to the world of the Founding Fathers.

and#160;

According to most narratives of the American Revolution, the founders were united in their quest for independence and steadfast in their efforts to create a stable, effective government. But the birth of our republic was far more complicated than many realize. The Revolution was nearly derailed by extremists who wanted to do too much, too quickly and who refused to rest until they had remade American society. If not for a small circle of conservatives who kept radicalism in check and promoted capitalism, a strong military, and the preservation of tradition, our country would be vastly different today.

and#160;

In the first book to chronicle the critical role these men played in securing our freedom, David Lefer provides an insightful and gripping account of the birth of modern American conservatism and its impact on the earliest days of our nation.

and#160;

Among these founding conservatives were men like John Dickinson, who joined George Washingtonand#8217;s troops in a battle against the British on July 4, 1776, and that same week drafted the Articles of Confederation; James Wilson, a staunch free-market capitalist who defended his home against a mob of radicals demanding price controls and in the process averted a bloody American equivalent to Bastille Day; Silas Deane, who mixed patriotism with profit seeking while petitioning France to aid America; and Robert Morris, who financed the American Revolution and founded the first bank and the first modern multinational corporation in the United States.

and#160;

Drawing on years of archival research, Lefer shows how these and other determined founders chamand#173;pioned American freedom while staying faithful to their ideals. In the process, they not only helped defeat the British but also laid the groundwork for American capitalism to thrive.

and#160;

The Founding Conservatives is an intellectual advenand#173;ture story, full of gunfights and big ideas. It is also an extraordinary reminder of the punishing battles our predecessors fought to create and maintain the free and prosperous nation we know today.

"Synopsis" by ,
The untold story of a small group of founders who prevented radicalism at the dawn of the republic
 
A nation at war. A real estate crash and financial meltdown. Bitter partisan disputes over taxation, the distribution of wealth, and the role of banks and corporations in society. Welcome to the world of the founding fathers.
 
According to most narratives of the American Revolution, the founders were united in their vision. But according to historian David Lefer, political disagreements split the new nation in two. Had it not been for a few individuals who exercised a pragmatic conservatism that valued capitalism, a strong military, and the preservation of tradition, our country would be vastly different today.
 
Drawing on years of archival research, Lefer tells the untold story of how these men not only saved the Revolution but also helped define American conservatism and create the foundations for our economy. America’s first banks and corporations would not have been possible without the bold and idealistic efforts of the first conservatives.
 
This is more than just a fascinating story; it is also a new perspective on the birth of a free and prosperous nation.

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