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1 Burnside Sociology- General

Lust in Translation: The Rules of Infidelity from Tokyo to Tennessee

by

Lust in Translation: The Rules of Infidelity from Tokyo to Tennessee Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A strange and surprising journey around the world to examine how and why people cheat on their spouses. This global look at infidelity truly reveals a puritanical America From Memphis to Moscow, when it comes to infidelity the statistics tell the story. People cheat on their spouses-in fact, they cheat with astonishing frequency. But even illicit love has rules, and these rules change radically from country to country. Acclaimed journalist Pamela Druckerman decided to investigate extramarital affairs all around the world to discover how different cultures deal with adultery-and her research leads her to believe that both the concept and the consequences of infidelity are far less rigid outside the United States. Americans, she decides, are the least adept at having affairs, have the most trouble enjoying them, and, in the end, suffer the most as a result of them. The rules of fidelity aren't as strict in many other parts of the world because some cultures have found ways to acknowledge that adultery is an expected, if not acceptable, part of the marriage contract. The French, contrary to popular belief, have affairs at about the same rate as Americans do, and they're just as titillated by sex scandals. Although the subject of infidelity is still very taboo there, unlike Americans, they refuse to moralize about it. In Russia, staying faithful to one's spouse is merely optional; one poll stated 50 percent of men and 25 percent of women have cheated on their current spouse, to say nothing of previous marriages. In Japan, Druckerman discovers that two-person futons and mattresses aren't even for sale in most stores, and the saying among businessmen is If you pay, it's not cheating. SomeJapanese marriage counselors hire prostitutes to teach women how to lure their husbands home. Pamela Druckerman, formerly a foreign correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, has done her homework. She's interviewed people from all over the world, from retirees in south Florida to polygamist Muslims in Indonesia, from ultra-orthodox Jews in Brooklyn to residents of a concubine village outside Hong Kong. She takes us on a journey all around the world, talking with sexologists, psychologists, marriage counselors, and most of all, cheaters and the people they've cheated on, only to discover that America is still a place with surprisingly outdated ideals. Meanwhile, elsewhere in the world, many cultures are more accepting of the fact that a monogamous marriage is an incredibly difficult contract to keep.

Review:

"Former foreign correspondent for the Wall Street Journal now living in Paris, Druckerman offers an anecdotal rather than a scholarly exploration of the international etiquette of adultery. From American prudishness about the subject to French discretion, and from Russian vehemence about the obligatory affair to Japanese adherence to the single marital futon, one factor rings true in all cases: people lie about sex. Druckerman interviews numerous adulterers, starting with the conflicted Americans who 'gain status by radiating an aura of monogamy' while sneaking around on the side; guilt more often than not brings them to confession and absolution by therapy. Druckerman is at pains to uncover reliable statistics about infidelity where such research is suppressed, such as in Islamic countries or those formerly Communist; in contrast, Finland demonstrates the best sex research, e.g., clearly half of men there enjoy 'parallel relationships.' Druckerman concludes from one study that people in warmer climes cheat more (Scandinavia is the exception), while people in wealthy countries tend to cheat less than those in poor countries (exception: Kazakhstan). Druckerman found that the rules of sexual cultures differ widely: adultery is the least dangerous social evil in Russia, while in Japan, buying sex doesn't count as cheating. Druckerman's work is quirky, digressive and media quotable." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"In America, we have someone 'on the side.' The Irish 'play offsides'; the English 'play away.' Swedes and Russians 'sneak to the left,' the Japanese 'go off the path' and the Dutch 'go strange' or 'pinch the cat in the dark,' whatever that means. The Indonesians, more romantically, have a 'wonderful interval.' Few activities in life have such delightful euphemisms as those describing infidelity. No... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

Compared to the citizens of just about every other nation, Americans are the least adept at having affairs, have the most trouble enjoying them, and suffer the most in their aftermath and Pamela Druckerman has the facts to prove it. The journalist's surprising findings include:
  • Russian spouses don't count beach resort flings as infidelity
  • South Africans consider drunkenness an adequate excuse for extramarital sex
  • Japanese businessmen believe, "If you pay, it's not cheating."
Voyeuristic and packed with eyebrow-raising statistics and interviews, Lust in Translation is her funny and fact-filled world tour of infidelity that will give new meaning to the phrase "practicing monogamy."

Synopsis:

Acclaimed journalist Druckerman decided to investigate extramarital affairs around the world to learn how different cultures deal with adultery. The result of her journey reveals some surprising results.

About the Author

Pamela Druckerman is a former staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal. She has a Master's in International Affairs from Columbia University, and has reported from S‹o Paulo, Buenos Aires, Jerusalem, Paris and New York. She lives in Paris.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594201141
Subtitle:
Infidelity from Tokyo to Tennessee
Author:
Druckerman, Pamela
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
Marriage
Subject:
Sociology - Marriage & Family
Subject:
Sexuality
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Sex
Subject:
Adultery
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20080325
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.3 x 6.26 x 1.14 in 1.1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Lust in Translation: The Rules of Infidelity from Tokyo to Tennessee Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$13.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Penguin Press - English 9781594201141 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Former foreign correspondent for the Wall Street Journal now living in Paris, Druckerman offers an anecdotal rather than a scholarly exploration of the international etiquette of adultery. From American prudishness about the subject to French discretion, and from Russian vehemence about the obligatory affair to Japanese adherence to the single marital futon, one factor rings true in all cases: people lie about sex. Druckerman interviews numerous adulterers, starting with the conflicted Americans who 'gain status by radiating an aura of monogamy' while sneaking around on the side; guilt more often than not brings them to confession and absolution by therapy. Druckerman is at pains to uncover reliable statistics about infidelity where such research is suppressed, such as in Islamic countries or those formerly Communist; in contrast, Finland demonstrates the best sex research, e.g., clearly half of men there enjoy 'parallel relationships.' Druckerman concludes from one study that people in warmer climes cheat more (Scandinavia is the exception), while people in wealthy countries tend to cheat less than those in poor countries (exception: Kazakhstan). Druckerman found that the rules of sexual cultures differ widely: adultery is the least dangerous social evil in Russia, while in Japan, buying sex doesn't count as cheating. Druckerman's work is quirky, digressive and media quotable." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
Compared to the citizens of just about every other nation, Americans are the least adept at having affairs, have the most trouble enjoying them, and suffer the most in their aftermath and Pamela Druckerman has the facts to prove it. The journalist's surprising findings include:
  • Russian spouses don't count beach resort flings as infidelity
  • South Africans consider drunkenness an adequate excuse for extramarital sex
  • Japanese businessmen believe, "If you pay, it's not cheating."
Voyeuristic and packed with eyebrow-raising statistics and interviews, Lust in Translation is her funny and fact-filled world tour of infidelity that will give new meaning to the phrase "practicing monogamy."
"Synopsis" by , Acclaimed journalist Druckerman decided to investigate extramarital affairs around the world to learn how different cultures deal with adultery. The result of her journey reveals some surprising results.
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