The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | July 22, 2014

Nick Harkaway: IMG The Florist-Assassins



The three men lit up in my mind's eye, with footnotes. They were converging on me — and on the object I was carrying — in a way that had... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Tigerman

    Nick Harkaway 9780385352413

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$3.50
List price: $25.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Child Care and Parenting- General

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

by

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother Cover

ISBN13: 9781594202841
ISBN10: 1594202842
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $3.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An awe-inspiring, often hilarious, and unerringly honest story of one mother's exercise in extreme parenting, revealing the rewards-and the costs-of raising her children the Chinese way.

All decent parents want to do what's best for their children. What Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother reveals is that the Chinese just have a totally different idea of how to do that. Western parents try to respect their children's individuality, encouraging them to pursue their true passions and providing a nurturing environment. The Chinese believe that the best way to protect your children is by preparing them for the future and arming them with skills, strong work habits, and inner confidence. Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother chronicles Chua's iron-willed decision to raise her daughters, Sophia and Lulu, her way-the Chinese way-and the remarkable results her choice inspires.

Here are some things Amy Chua would never allow her daughters to do:

-have a playdate
-be in a school play
-complain about not being in a school play
-not be the #1 student in every subject except gym and drama
-play any instrument other than the piano or violin
-not play the piano or violin

The truth is Lulu and Sophia would never have had time for a playdate. They were too busy practicing their instruments (two to three hours a day and double sessions on the weekend) and perfecting their Mandarin.

Of course no one is perfect, including Chua herself. According to Sophia, here are three things I actually said to her at the piano as I supervised her practicing:
1. Oh my God, you're just getting worse and worse.
2. I'm going to count to three, then I want musicality.
3. If the next time's not PERFECT, I'm going to take all your stuffed animals and burn them

But Chua demands as much of herself as she does of her daughters. And in her sacrifices-the exacting attention spent studying her daughters' performances, the office hours lost shuttling the girls to lessons-the depth of her love for her children becomes clear. Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is an eye-opening exploration of the differences in Eastern and Western parenting- and the lessons parents and children everywhere teach one another.

Review:

"Chua (Day of Empire) imparts the secret behind the stereotypical Asian child's phenomenal success: the Chinese mother. Chua promotes what has traditionally worked very well in raising children: strict, Old World, uncompromising values — and the parents don't have to be Chinese. What they are, however, are different from what she sees as indulgent and permissive Western parents: stressing academic performance above all, never accepting a mediocre grade, insisting on drilling and practice, and instilling respect for authority. Chua and her Jewish husband (both are professors at Yale Law) raised two girls, and her account of their formative years achieving amazing success in school and music performance proves both a model and a cautionary tale. Sophia, the eldest, was dutiful and diligent, leapfrogging over her peers in academics and as a Suzuki piano student; Lulu was also gifted, but defiant, who excelled at the violin but eventually balked at her mother's pushing. Chua's efforts 'not to raise a soft, entitled child' will strike American readers as a little scary — removing her children from school for extra practice, public shaming and insults, equating Western parenting with failure--but the results, she claims somewhat glibly in this frank, unapologetic report card, 'were hard to quarrel with.' (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is an awe-inspiring, often hilarious, and unerringly honest story of one mother's exercise in extreme parenting, revealing the rewards — and the costs — of raising her daughters the Chinese way.

Synopsis:

The New York Times Book Review

“[E]ntertaining, bracingly honest and, yes, thought-provoking.”

At once provocative and laugh-out-loud funny, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother ignited a global parenting debate with its story of one mothers journey in strict parenting.  Amy Chua argues that Western parenting tries to respect and nurture childrens individuality, while Chinese parents typically believe that arming children with skills, strong work habits, and inner confidence prepares them best for the future.   Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother chronicles Chuas iron-willed decision to raise her daughters, Sophia and Lulu, the Chinese way – and the remarkable, sometimes heartbreaking  results her choice inspires.  Achingly honest and profoundly challenging, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is one of the most talked-about books of our times.

“Few have the guts to parent in public. Amy [Chua]'s memoir is brutally honest, and her willingness to share her struggles is a gift. Whether or not you agree with her priorities and approach, she should be applauded for raising these issues with a thoughtful, humorous and authentic voice.” –Time Magazine

“[A] riveting read… Chua's story is far more complicated and interesting than what you've heard to date — and well worth picking up… I guarantee that if you read the book, there'll undoubtedly be places where you'll cringe in recognition, and others where you'll tear up in empathy.” –San Francisco Chronicle

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother hit the parenting hot button, but also a lot more, including people's complicated feelings about ambition, intellectualism, high culture, the Ivy League, strong women and America's standing in a world where China is ascendant. Chua's conviction that hard work leads to inner confidence is a resonant one.” –Chicago Tribune

“Readers will alternately gasp at and empathize with Chua's struggles and aspirations, all the while enjoying her writing, which, like her kid-rearing philosophy, is brisk, lively and no-holds-barred. This memoir raises intriguing, sometimes uncomfortable questions about love, pride, ambition, achievement and self-worth that will resonate among success-obsessed parents… Readers of all stripes will respond to [Battle Hymn of the] Tiger Mother.” –The Washington Post

Synopsis:

Unabridged, 5 CDs, 6 hours

Read by TBA

An awe-inspiring, often hilarious, and unerringly honest story of one mother's exercise in extreme parenting, revealing the rewards-and the costs-of raising her children the Chinese way.

About the Author

Amy Chua is the John M. Duff Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Her first book, World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability, a New York Times bestseller, was selected by The Economist as one of the best books of 2003. Her second book, Day of Empire: How Hyperpowers Rise to Global Dominance and Why They Fall, was a critically acclaimed Foreign Affairs bestseller. She lives with her husband, two daughters, and two Samoyeds in New Haven, Connecticut.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

writermala, April 24, 2011 (view all comments by writermala)
Judging by the article in the Wall Street Journal, and the early press and discussions I thought I would get a description of a "wicked witch" mother who drove her kids to desperation. Instead what I got was a moving, humorous account of one woman's fighting desire to see her daughters be the best they could be. Amy is both sensitive and truthful about her battles with Lulu and admits to her own failings. I can see many mothers whose children have left the nest, wishing they could do it all over, and many others saying, "move over Dr. Spock, Amy Chua is here!' A definite keeper
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
kauyyek, February 27, 2011 (view all comments by kauyyek)
This book infuriated me. I listened to the audio version so I did a lot talking back to Ms. Chua as I listened. I kept yelling "Moderation! Why don't you try moderation?" Her smugness made me want to scream, which I did sometimes. The sleepover story made me incredibly angry - if she had taken the time to get to know her daughter's classmates, then maybe she would have made a better choice about it. So, why did I give it a 4 our of 5? I listened to it with my kids (11 and 14) and it was great fodder for discussion. (Plus, I hope that it made them appreciate me a little bit more.)
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
TKS, February 7, 2011 (view all comments by TKS)
I noticed this filed in the "Children and Parenting" section at one store. I think that obscures the point of the book for many readers and reviewers. Battle Hymn is not a parenting manual, and it's not even entirely about raising kids. It's a memoir first: about family, philosophy, and legacy, and yes, it's focused on the author's method of raising her children.

If it WAS a parenting manual, I'd have to say it makes some good points but I disagree with the larger premise, and I'd move on. (Then again, I might have skipped it entirely -- my own parents taught me how to raise kids, and my husband's parents taught him how not to. Books on the subject are entirely overrated in comparison. But back to the book at hand...) Battle Hymn is much more complex than the Chinese Parenting Manual" it's been made out to be. Whatever you think of Amy Chua's "extreme" "Chinese" parenting style, her memoir on the subject is very much worth a read, for several reasons.

1) It asks you to think about a big-picture plan of how you were raised and how you will raise/are raising children. This is something plenty of us don't often consider beyond the basic "do I want kids or not?" Amy Chua doesn't just react to her children. She has a PLAN. She is raising her kids to a purpose. Are you? WHY were you raised? How did you feel about it? How do you feel about it now?

2)It takes #1 and asks you to think about parenting and growing up in the context of different cultures' family values, the idea of legacy, the definition and value of "achievement," world politics, American "superiority," and ethnic identity. How about those for the topics of your next PTA meeting?

3) It has started a HUGE conversation about #s 1 and 2. I think that's a good thing.

4) It's well-written. You don't have to "work" through it, but you'll find yourself working with the ideas that spring from it in many different contexts. Not just for parents, ideas about the continuity of family, the unavoidable (?) differences between generations, and divergent cultural expectations are absolutely relevant to our entire world.

5) It's frankly, sometimes painfully honest, and you can hear Chua's voice so clearly. (Bonus: get the audiobook version and you can actually HEAR Chua's voice, and thus "read" it the way she does.)

6) It's hilarious.

The short version: don't buy the hype, but do read this book, and join the discussion. Even if it pisses you off, you'll enjoy it. (Some people like being pissed off.) You might even learn something from your own reactions.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594202841
Author:
Chua, Amy
Publisher:
Penguin Press
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Mothers and daughters -- United States.
Subject:
Chinese American women
Subject:
Parenting - Motherhood
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20110131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w photos throughout
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.36 x 6.08 x 0.94 in 0.94 lb
Age Level:
17-17

Other books you might like

  1. Silent Spring Used Mass Market $4.95
  2. Taking the Leap: Freeing Ourselves... Used Trade Paper $8.00

Related Subjects


Biography » General
Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Asian American

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.50 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Penguin Press - English 9781594202841 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Chua (Day of Empire) imparts the secret behind the stereotypical Asian child's phenomenal success: the Chinese mother. Chua promotes what has traditionally worked very well in raising children: strict, Old World, uncompromising values — and the parents don't have to be Chinese. What they are, however, are different from what she sees as indulgent and permissive Western parents: stressing academic performance above all, never accepting a mediocre grade, insisting on drilling and practice, and instilling respect for authority. Chua and her Jewish husband (both are professors at Yale Law) raised two girls, and her account of their formative years achieving amazing success in school and music performance proves both a model and a cautionary tale. Sophia, the eldest, was dutiful and diligent, leapfrogging over her peers in academics and as a Suzuki piano student; Lulu was also gifted, but defiant, who excelled at the violin but eventually balked at her mother's pushing. Chua's efforts 'not to raise a soft, entitled child' will strike American readers as a little scary — removing her children from school for extra practice, public shaming and insults, equating Western parenting with failure--but the results, she claims somewhat glibly in this frank, unapologetic report card, 'were hard to quarrel with.' (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is an awe-inspiring, often hilarious, and unerringly honest story of one mother's exercise in extreme parenting, revealing the rewards — and the costs — of raising her daughters the Chinese way.
"Synopsis" by ,
The New York Times Book Review

“[E]ntertaining, bracingly honest and, yes, thought-provoking.”

At once provocative and laugh-out-loud funny, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother ignited a global parenting debate with its story of one mothers journey in strict parenting.  Amy Chua argues that Western parenting tries to respect and nurture childrens individuality, while Chinese parents typically believe that arming children with skills, strong work habits, and inner confidence prepares them best for the future.   Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother chronicles Chuas iron-willed decision to raise her daughters, Sophia and Lulu, the Chinese way – and the remarkable, sometimes heartbreaking  results her choice inspires.  Achingly honest and profoundly challenging, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is one of the most talked-about books of our times.

“Few have the guts to parent in public. Amy [Chua]'s memoir is brutally honest, and her willingness to share her struggles is a gift. Whether or not you agree with her priorities and approach, she should be applauded for raising these issues with a thoughtful, humorous and authentic voice.” –Time Magazine

“[A] riveting read… Chua's story is far more complicated and interesting than what you've heard to date — and well worth picking up… I guarantee that if you read the book, there'll undoubtedly be places where you'll cringe in recognition, and others where you'll tear up in empathy.” –San Francisco Chronicle

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother hit the parenting hot button, but also a lot more, including people's complicated feelings about ambition, intellectualism, high culture, the Ivy League, strong women and America's standing in a world where China is ascendant. Chua's conviction that hard work leads to inner confidence is a resonant one.” –Chicago Tribune

“Readers will alternately gasp at and empathize with Chua's struggles and aspirations, all the while enjoying her writing, which, like her kid-rearing philosophy, is brisk, lively and no-holds-barred. This memoir raises intriguing, sometimes uncomfortable questions about love, pride, ambition, achievement and self-worth that will resonate among success-obsessed parents… Readers of all stripes will respond to [Battle Hymn of the] Tiger Mother.” –The Washington Post

"Synopsis" by ,
Unabridged, 5 CDs, 6 hours

Read by TBA

An awe-inspiring, often hilarious, and unerringly honest story of one mother's exercise in extreme parenting, revealing the rewards-and the costs-of raising her children the Chinese way.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.