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Little Stalker: A Novel

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Little Stalker: A Novel Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An offbeat and hilarious story of voyeurism, obsession, and relationships — both real and imaginary — from the bestselling author of High Maintenance and Going Down.

Since she was thirteen, one of the few things New York novelist Rebekah Kettle has been able to count on is the thrill of seeing a new movie by world-renowned filmmaker Arthur Weeman every fall. Now thirty-three, the humor and poignancy of Weeman's singular movies have inextricably merged with her own memories — to the point that she has begun writing him letters under the guise of her thirteen-year-old self — and her teenage admiration has become fullblown obsession. So when Rebekah steps back and takes stock of her own life, she isn't happy with what she finds: She's unlucky in love, hopelessly stalled in her work, and unable to get over the past.

It's time for Rebekah to take action. She starts a relationship with Isaac Myman, a quirky paparazzo with whom she's suspiciously compatible. And she befriends Mrs. Williams, an eccentric older woman who needs her companionship. It seems things are looking up. But, just as unexpectedly, Rebekah discovers that Mrs. Williams's apartment has the most coveted view on the Upper East Side — straight into Arthur Weeman's town house — where she can watch the object of her obsession's life displayed like a silent movie. Weeman has always been a fixture on the rumor mill, but Rebekah has been his staunchest defender — until she sees the evidence for herself, and has to ask herself some questions. Does she give her new love a chance at the scoop of a lifetime — a photo of the compromised Weeman — or does she remain loyal to the man whose films have defined her life?

Riotously funny and astonishingly moving, Little Stalker is a bold, daring, twisted, and lovable novel that could have come only from a literary voice as sharp and original as Jennifer Belle.

Review:

"At age 33, in search of a man, a second novel and a life, Manhattan writer Rebekah Kettle occupies the singleton's circle of hell. Having defaulted on her book contract, she's reduced to working as a physician's assistant for her eccentric dad, her only meaningful relationship with a senile old woman with whom she wallows in Little House on the Prairie reruns. And she's plagued by a bitchy, big-breasted gossip columnist who wants her to blurb her book. One bright spot: her brain tumor isn't fatal. The unlikely catalyst for Rebekah's recovery is her obsession with Woody Allenesque director Arthur Weeman. She begins dating a sympatico young Weeman look-alike and rekindles her creative spark by writing the filmmaker flirty letters in the voice of a 12-year-old girl. When she spies Weeman in a compromising position, she reexamines her own romantic history with much older men, beginning with her middle-school defloration and subsequent abortion. Belle (High Maintenance; Going Down) sometimes loses the story amid a swirl of wisecracking, madcap moments, and the tone she uses on her more intense psychosexual material doesn't always work. Still, she's in fine form, and her sensibility sparkles with offbeat humor. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"At age 33, in search of a man, a second novel and a life, Manhattan writer Rebekah Kettle occupies the singleton's circle of hell. Having defaulted on her book contract, she's reduced to working as a physician's assistant for her eccentric dad, her only meaningful relationship with a senile old woman with whom she wallows in Little House on the Prairie reruns. And she's plagued by a bitchy, big-breasted gossip columnist who wants her to blurb her book. One bright spot: her brain tumor isn't fatal. The unlikely catalyst for Rebekah's recovery is her obsession with Woody Allenesque director Arthur Weeman. She begins dating a sympatico young Weeman look-alike and rekindles her creative spark by writing the filmmaker flirty letters in the voice of a 12-year-old girl. When she spies Weeman in a compromising position, she reexamines her own romantic history with much older men, beginning with her middle-school defloration and subsequent abortion. Belle (High Maintenance; Going Down) sometimes loses the story amid a swirl of wisecracking, madcap moments, and the tone she uses on her more intense psychosexual material doesn't always work. Still, she's in fine form, and her sensibility sparkles with offbeat humor. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"In eccentric Rebekah, Belle has created another unforgettable narrator — funny, self-absorbed, a little damaged — and never predictable. Darkly comic journey touching on love, art and the nature of obsession." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Belle has moments of comic inspiration...but they aren't enough to sustain this predictable addition to a chick-lit field already well populated with comely heroines and clever quips. Still, for those addicted to the genre, it will provide the necessary fix." Booklist

Review:

"Using a pedophilia plot in fluffy chick lit is brave, though several of Little Stalker's characters (a testy gossip columnist) and scenarios (Rebekah's doctor dad is hiding an office affair) are so clichéd they barely register. (Grade: B)" Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"You have to admire a writer who can create a character who is monumentally neurotic, yet oddly appealing nevertheless." Hartford Courant

Synopsis:

In the tradition of Tom Perrotta, an offbeat and hilarious story of voyeurism, obsession, and relationships-both real and imaginary-from the bestselling author of High Maintenance and Going Down.

Rebekah Kettle is obsessed. Not with her quirky, adoring paparazzo boyfriend or the gossip columnist who wants to be her new best friend, but with someone shes never even met—cult filmmaker Arthur Weeman. But when the window of an Upper East Side apartment provides her with a scandalous view into Weemans life, Rebekah has to decide: does she give her new love the scoop of a lifetime—a photo of the compromised Weeman—or does she remain loyal to the man whose films have defined her life? Bold, daring, and deliciously twisted, Little Stalker is a hilarious story of voyeurism, obsession, and relationships—both real and

About the Author

Jennifer Belle is the author of Going Down and High Maintenance. She lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594489464
Author:
Belle, Jennifer
Publisher:
Riverhead Hardcover
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Dating (social customs)
Subject:
Single women
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
May 17, 2007
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.26x6.64x1.15 in. 1.18 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Little Stalker: A Novel Used Hardcover
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$6.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Riverhead Hardcover - English 9781594489464 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "At age 33, in search of a man, a second novel and a life, Manhattan writer Rebekah Kettle occupies the singleton's circle of hell. Having defaulted on her book contract, she's reduced to working as a physician's assistant for her eccentric dad, her only meaningful relationship with a senile old woman with whom she wallows in Little House on the Prairie reruns. And she's plagued by a bitchy, big-breasted gossip columnist who wants her to blurb her book. One bright spot: her brain tumor isn't fatal. The unlikely catalyst for Rebekah's recovery is her obsession with Woody Allenesque director Arthur Weeman. She begins dating a sympatico young Weeman look-alike and rekindles her creative spark by writing the filmmaker flirty letters in the voice of a 12-year-old girl. When she spies Weeman in a compromising position, she reexamines her own romantic history with much older men, beginning with her middle-school defloration and subsequent abortion. Belle (High Maintenance; Going Down) sometimes loses the story amid a swirl of wisecracking, madcap moments, and the tone she uses on her more intense psychosexual material doesn't always work. Still, she's in fine form, and her sensibility sparkles with offbeat humor. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "At age 33, in search of a man, a second novel and a life, Manhattan writer Rebekah Kettle occupies the singleton's circle of hell. Having defaulted on her book contract, she's reduced to working as a physician's assistant for her eccentric dad, her only meaningful relationship with a senile old woman with whom she wallows in Little House on the Prairie reruns. And she's plagued by a bitchy, big-breasted gossip columnist who wants her to blurb her book. One bright spot: her brain tumor isn't fatal. The unlikely catalyst for Rebekah's recovery is her obsession with Woody Allenesque director Arthur Weeman. She begins dating a sympatico young Weeman look-alike and rekindles her creative spark by writing the filmmaker flirty letters in the voice of a 12-year-old girl. When she spies Weeman in a compromising position, she reexamines her own romantic history with much older men, beginning with her middle-school defloration and subsequent abortion. Belle (High Maintenance; Going Down) sometimes loses the story amid a swirl of wisecracking, madcap moments, and the tone she uses on her more intense psychosexual material doesn't always work. Still, she's in fine form, and her sensibility sparkles with offbeat humor. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "In eccentric Rebekah, Belle has created another unforgettable narrator — funny, self-absorbed, a little damaged — and never predictable. Darkly comic journey touching on love, art and the nature of obsession."
"Review" by , "Belle has moments of comic inspiration...but they aren't enough to sustain this predictable addition to a chick-lit field already well populated with comely heroines and clever quips. Still, for those addicted to the genre, it will provide the necessary fix."
"Review" by , "Using a pedophilia plot in fluffy chick lit is brave, though several of Little Stalker's characters (a testy gossip columnist) and scenarios (Rebekah's doctor dad is hiding an office affair) are so clichéd they barely register. (Grade: B)"
"Review" by , "You have to admire a writer who can create a character who is monumentally neurotic, yet oddly appealing nevertheless."
"Synopsis" by ,
In the tradition of Tom Perrotta, an offbeat and hilarious story of voyeurism, obsession, and relationships-both real and imaginary-from the bestselling author of High Maintenance and Going Down.

Rebekah Kettle is obsessed. Not with her quirky, adoring paparazzo boyfriend or the gossip columnist who wants to be her new best friend, but with someone shes never even met—cult filmmaker Arthur Weeman. But when the window of an Upper East Side apartment provides her with a scandalous view into Weemans life, Rebekah has to decide: does she give her new love the scoop of a lifetime—a photo of the compromised Weeman—or does she remain loyal to the man whose films have defined her life? Bold, daring, and deliciously twisted, Little Stalker is a hilarious story of voyeurism, obsession, and relationships—both real and

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