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1 Burnside Music- Hip Hop and Rap

Other People's Property: A Shadow History of Hip-Hop in White America

by

Other People's Property: A Shadow History of Hip-Hop in White America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Over the last quarter-century hip-hop has grown from an esoteric form of African-American expression to become the dominant form of American popular culture. Today, Snoop Dogg shills for Chrysler and white kids wear Fubu, the black-owned label whose name stands for "For Us, By Us." This is not the first time that black music has been appreciated, adopted, and adapted by white audiences — think jazz, blues, and rock — but Jason Tanz, a white boy who grew up in the suburban Northwest, says that hip-hop's journey through white America provides a unique window to examine the racial dissonance that has become a fact of our national life. In such culture-sharing Tanz sees white Americans struggling with their identity, and wrestling (often unsuccessfully) with the legacy of race.

To support his anecdotally driven history of hip-hop's cross-over to white America, Tanz conducts dozens of interviews with fans, artists, producers, and promoters, including some of hip-hop's most legendary figures — such as Public Enemy's Chuck D; white rapper MC Serch; and former Yo! MTV Raps host Fab 5 Freddy. He travels across the country, visiting "nerdcore" rappers in Seattle, who rhyme about Star Wars conventions; a group of would-be gangstas in a suburb so insulated it's called "the bubble"; a break-dancing class at the upper-crusty New Canaan Tap Academy; and many more. Drawing on the author's personal experience as a white fan as well as his in-depth knowledge of hip-hop's history, Other People's Property provides a hard-edged, thought-provoking, and humorous snapshot of the particularly American intersection of race, commerce, culture, and identity.

Review:

"Suburban white kids' increasingly ubiquitous fascination with hip-hop culture is the subject of this thoughtful and often insightful work of long-form journalism. Tanz, a young white man himself and an editor at Fortune Small Business, is an apt chronicler of the racial and cultural obstacles that stand between the producers and consumers of rap. He has an obvious passion for the music at hand, and he demonstrates his connoisseurship through brilliant evocations of the power of the band N.W.A. and the often painful history of white rappers. Tanz is most successful when he lets himself get tangled up in the complicated tendons of mass culture: his chapter about hip-hop marketing and commercialization displays a keen understanding of the advertising forces at work without ever devolving into simplistic damnation. Other aspects of the book are less satisfying, most notably the framing devices for each chapter in which Tanz chooses seemingly arbitrary instances of white appropriations of hip-hop culture — such as a hipster dance party in Williamsburg — to illustrate larger points. Nevertheless, Tanz solidly displays his strong grasp of the broad cultural significance of the rise of hip-hop." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Hip-hop is dead. That's what rap legend Nas claims in the title of his latest album. He just might be right. According to Nielsen Soundscan, album sales in all genres declined by nearly 5 percent in 2006, largely attributable to the increasing popularity of digital downloads. Rap sales, however, plummeted by more than 20 percent, the most of any genre. Ironically, this downturn comes at a time when... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Readers looking for an inclusive study of the ways white fans have incorporated the art form into their lives will be disappointed and unenlightened. Honest and self-effacing, but too thin to make a lasting impression." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Tanz makes what sense can be made of such aspirations and affords an ironic, insightful look at how rap and hip-hop have permeated the media landscape even while large segments of society maintain a baffled disconnection from the music." Booklist

Review:

"Personal without being self-indulgent and well-researched but never stiff, Other People's Property is a thoughtful, clear-eyed look at a hot-button topic — it's a real contribution to the study of hip-hop." Alan Light, former editor in chief, Vibe magazine, and author of Vibe: History of Hip Hop and The Skills to Pay the Bills: The Story of the Beastie Boys

Synopsis:

Drawing on his personal experience as a white fan as well as his in-depth knowledge of hip-hop's history, Tanz provides a hard-edged, thought-provoking, and humorous snapshot of the particularly American intersection of race, commerce, culture, and identity.

About the Author

Jason Tanz is a senior editor at Fortune Small Business. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Fortune, Spin, and Time Out New York, among other publications. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781596912731
Subtitle:
A Shadow History of Hip-Hop in White America
Author:
Tanz, Jason
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Youth
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - General
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Rap & Hip Hop
Subject:
United States Description and travel.
Subject:
Rap (music)
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20070206
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rap and Hip-Hop
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Other People's Property: A Shadow History of Hip-Hop in White America Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Bloomsbury Publishing PLC - English 9781596912731 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Suburban white kids' increasingly ubiquitous fascination with hip-hop culture is the subject of this thoughtful and often insightful work of long-form journalism. Tanz, a young white man himself and an editor at Fortune Small Business, is an apt chronicler of the racial and cultural obstacles that stand between the producers and consumers of rap. He has an obvious passion for the music at hand, and he demonstrates his connoisseurship through brilliant evocations of the power of the band N.W.A. and the often painful history of white rappers. Tanz is most successful when he lets himself get tangled up in the complicated tendons of mass culture: his chapter about hip-hop marketing and commercialization displays a keen understanding of the advertising forces at work without ever devolving into simplistic damnation. Other aspects of the book are less satisfying, most notably the framing devices for each chapter in which Tanz chooses seemingly arbitrary instances of white appropriations of hip-hop culture — such as a hipster dance party in Williamsburg — to illustrate larger points. Nevertheless, Tanz solidly displays his strong grasp of the broad cultural significance of the rise of hip-hop." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Readers looking for an inclusive study of the ways white fans have incorporated the art form into their lives will be disappointed and unenlightened. Honest and self-effacing, but too thin to make a lasting impression."
"Review" by , "Tanz makes what sense can be made of such aspirations and affords an ironic, insightful look at how rap and hip-hop have permeated the media landscape even while large segments of society maintain a baffled disconnection from the music."
"Review" by , "Personal without being self-indulgent and well-researched but never stiff, Other People's Property is a thoughtful, clear-eyed look at a hot-button topic — it's a real contribution to the study of hip-hop." Alan Light, former editor in chief, Vibe magazine, and author of Vibe: History of Hip Hop and The Skills to Pay the Bills: The Story of the Beastie Boys
"Synopsis" by , Drawing on his personal experience as a white fan as well as his in-depth knowledge of hip-hop's history, Tanz provides a hard-edged, thought-provoking, and humorous snapshot of the particularly American intersection of race, commerce, culture, and identity.
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