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The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower (Dark Tower #07)

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The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower (Dark Tower #07) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

All good things must come to an end, Constant Reader, and not even Stephen King can make a story that goes on forever. The tale of Roland Deschain's relentless quest for the Dark Tower has, the author fears, sorely tried the patience of those who have followed it from its earliest chapters. But attend to it a while longer, if it pleases you, for this volume is the last, and often the last things are best.

Roland's ka-tet remains intact, though scattered over wheres and whens. Susannah-Mia has been carried from the Dixie Pig (in the summer of 1999) to a birthing room — really a chamber of horrors — in Thunderclap's Fedic; Jake and Father Callahan, with Oy between them, have entered the restaurant on Lex and Sixty-first with weapons drawn, little knowing how numerous and noxious are their foes. Roland and Eddie are with John Cullum in Maine, in 1977, looking for the site on Turtleback Lane where "walk-ins" have been often seen. They want desperately to get back to the others, to Susannah especially, and yet they have come to realize that the world they need to escape is the only one that matters.

Thus the book opens, like a door to the uttermost reaches of Stephen King's imagination. You've come this far. Come a little farther. Come all the way. The sound you hear may be the slamming of the door behind you. Welcome to The Dark Tower.

Review:

"A pilgrimage that began with one lone man's quest to save multiple worlds from chaos and destruction unfolds into a tale of epic proportions. While King saw some criticism for the slow pace of 1982's The Gunslinger, the book that launched this series, The Drawing of the Three (Book II, 1987), reeled in readers with its fantastical allure. And those who have faithfully journeyed alongside Roland, Eddie, Susannah, Jake and Oy ever since will find their loyalty toward the series' creator richly rewarded. The tangled web of the tower's multiple worlds has manifested itself in many of King's other works — The Stand (1978), Insomnia (1994) and Hearts in Atlantis (1999), to name a few. As one character explains here, 'From the spring of 1970, when he typed the line The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed...very few of the things Stephen King wrote were "just stories." He may not believe that; we do.' King, in fact, intertwines his own life story deeper and deeper into the tale of Roland and his surrogate family of gunslingers, and, in this final installment, playfully and seductively suggests that it might not be the author who drives the story, but rather the fictional characters that control the author. This philosophical exploration of free will and destiny may surprise those who have viewed King as a prolific pop-fiction dispenser. But a closer look at the brilliant complexity of his Dark Tower world should explain why this bestselling author has finally been recognized for his contribution to the contemporary literary canon. With the conclusion of this tale, ostensibly the last published work of his career, King has certainly reached the top of his game. And as for who or what resides at the top of the tower...The many readers dying to know will have to start at the beginning and work their way up. 12 color illus. by Michael Whelan. Agent, Arthur Greene. (Sept. 21)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The Dark Tower stands as an imposing example of pure storytelling....An absorbing, constantly surprising novel filled with true narrative magic....The Dark Tower is a humane, visionary epic and a true magnum opus. It will be around for a very long time." Bill Sheehan, The Washington Post

Review:

"In the last two books of his Dark Tower saga, King pulled out all the stops....The Dark Tower is no different....As with the last three books in this series, King's writing is powerful and often graphic." Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Review:

"Despite plenty of action and quite a few unforeseen bombshells, this massive conclusion may strike some as drawn out....But what the...tale is all about is more teasingly evident than ever before: it's a fable, possibly theological, of creativity..." Booklist

Review:

"Multidimensional fantasy-leaps and grisly horror balance long ho-hum stretches....[W]hat can you say when your lead character is less expressive than Audie Murphy...and far less compelling than Frodo or Harry Potter?" Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"King does a good job of bringing it all home in The Dark Tower....King is a master of the final stand. His climaxes are so stunning and so vivid, because like any good ambush, such care is taken in setting them up." The Oregonian (Portland, OR)

Review:

"I have reviewed all seven of these books in the News along with hundreds of other fantasy and science fiction novels in the last three decades. Both as entertainment and as literature, the Dark Tower series is as good as it gets." Rocky Mountain News

Review:

"The Dark Tower is now a completed story, huge and obviously imperfect. There's a terrific ending here, followed by two epilogues. The first is easy and pat. The second is surprising and, in the context of the whole tale, far more satisfying." Kansas City Star

Review:

"[T]he end of The Dark Tower VII is, in this reviewer's opinion, the best ending King has written in his prolific career." Philadelphia Inquirer

Review:

"King practically bludgeons his readers with clues, but we're so caught up in the story that it's little more than background noise. The final hammer blow is also a bit diffuse and confusing; it may take some contemplation and rereading." San Jose Mercury News

Review:

"[A] telephone directory of a novel (800 pages) that will keep you up all night for a couple of nights....It has been enthralling and at times frustrating, but this final novel is the ultimate reward. Sai King, we say thank ya." BookReporter.com

Synopsis:

The most anticipated book in Stephen King's legendary career, The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower is the final installment to the bestselling author's epic series — a story that began thirty-three years ago with The Gunslinger and has gathered millions of ardent fans since Donald M. Grant published a limited edition of that first volume in 1981.

This volume completes the quest of Roland Deschain, the last gunslinger in a world which has "moved on." Like the first book in the series, the last is beautifully illustrated by famed fantasy artist Michael Whelan. And with the same mix of triumph and loss that made Wolves of the Calla a runaway bestseller, The Dark Tower tracks Roland towards his ultimate goal, the tower itself — the center of all time, all place. But this time, as Roland's ka-tet moves through The Dixie Pig in New York City to Algul Siento in End-World, the losses come from within his circle of companions. His antagonists, from Mia's chap Mordred to the force of evil known as the Crimson King, grow more desperate. In the final stage of his search, Roland needs one more ally, a last key to gain entry to the tower. What awaits him there, at the tower's very top, is a mystery sure to awe King's legions of devoted fans.

With Stephen King's unparalleled storytelling power, and with interest in fantasy at an all-time high, the release of The Dark Tower will be the most exciting publishing event of the year.

Synopsis:

The final volume of Stephen King's masterful multi-volume epic — hailed as a "hypnotic blend of suspense and sentimentality...a sprawling, eventful tale of demons, monsters, narrow escapes, and magic portals" (The New York Times Book Review).

About the Author

Stephen King lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, Tabitha. They have three grown children: Naomi Rachel, Joe Hill and Owen Phillip.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781880418628
Subtitle:
The Dark Tower
Author:
King, Stephen
Illustrator:
Whelan, Michael
Illustrated by:
Whelan, Michael
Author:
Whelan, Michael
Publisher:
Donald M. Grant/Scribner
Subject:
Maine
Subject:
New york (n.y.)
Subject:
Fantasy - Series
Subject:
Fantasy - Epic
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Fantasy fiction
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Dark Tower
Series Volume:
07
Publication Date:
September 2004
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
864
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 48.265 oz

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Horror » General
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Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » Fantasy » Epic

The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower (Dark Tower #07) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.95 In Stock
Product details 864 pages Donald M. Grant/Scribner - English 9781880418628 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A pilgrimage that began with one lone man's quest to save multiple worlds from chaos and destruction unfolds into a tale of epic proportions. While King saw some criticism for the slow pace of 1982's The Gunslinger, the book that launched this series, The Drawing of the Three (Book II, 1987), reeled in readers with its fantastical allure. And those who have faithfully journeyed alongside Roland, Eddie, Susannah, Jake and Oy ever since will find their loyalty toward the series' creator richly rewarded. The tangled web of the tower's multiple worlds has manifested itself in many of King's other works — The Stand (1978), Insomnia (1994) and Hearts in Atlantis (1999), to name a few. As one character explains here, 'From the spring of 1970, when he typed the line The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed...very few of the things Stephen King wrote were "just stories." He may not believe that; we do.' King, in fact, intertwines his own life story deeper and deeper into the tale of Roland and his surrogate family of gunslingers, and, in this final installment, playfully and seductively suggests that it might not be the author who drives the story, but rather the fictional characters that control the author. This philosophical exploration of free will and destiny may surprise those who have viewed King as a prolific pop-fiction dispenser. But a closer look at the brilliant complexity of his Dark Tower world should explain why this bestselling author has finally been recognized for his contribution to the contemporary literary canon. With the conclusion of this tale, ostensibly the last published work of his career, King has certainly reached the top of his game. And as for who or what resides at the top of the tower...The many readers dying to know will have to start at the beginning and work their way up. 12 color illus. by Michael Whelan. Agent, Arthur Greene. (Sept. 21)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "The Dark Tower stands as an imposing example of pure storytelling....An absorbing, constantly surprising novel filled with true narrative magic....The Dark Tower is a humane, visionary epic and a true magnum opus. It will be around for a very long time."
"Review" by , "In the last two books of his Dark Tower saga, King pulled out all the stops....The Dark Tower is no different....As with the last three books in this series, King's writing is powerful and often graphic."
"Review" by , "Despite plenty of action and quite a few unforeseen bombshells, this massive conclusion may strike some as drawn out....But what the...tale is all about is more teasingly evident than ever before: it's a fable, possibly theological, of creativity..."
"Review" by , "Multidimensional fantasy-leaps and grisly horror balance long ho-hum stretches....[W]hat can you say when your lead character is less expressive than Audie Murphy...and far less compelling than Frodo or Harry Potter?"
"Review" by , "King does a good job of bringing it all home in The Dark Tower....King is a master of the final stand. His climaxes are so stunning and so vivid, because like any good ambush, such care is taken in setting them up."
"Review" by , "I have reviewed all seven of these books in the News along with hundreds of other fantasy and science fiction novels in the last three decades. Both as entertainment and as literature, the Dark Tower series is as good as it gets."
"Review" by , "The Dark Tower is now a completed story, huge and obviously imperfect. There's a terrific ending here, followed by two epilogues. The first is easy and pat. The second is surprising and, in the context of the whole tale, far more satisfying."
"Review" by , "[T]he end of The Dark Tower VII is, in this reviewer's opinion, the best ending King has written in his prolific career."
"Review" by , "King practically bludgeons his readers with clues, but we're so caught up in the story that it's little more than background noise. The final hammer blow is also a bit diffuse and confusing; it may take some contemplation and rereading."
"Review" by , "[A] telephone directory of a novel (800 pages) that will keep you up all night for a couple of nights....It has been enthralling and at times frustrating, but this final novel is the ultimate reward. Sai King, we say thank ya."
"Synopsis" by , The most anticipated book in Stephen King's legendary career, The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower is the final installment to the bestselling author's epic series — a story that began thirty-three years ago with The Gunslinger and has gathered millions of ardent fans since Donald M. Grant published a limited edition of that first volume in 1981.

This volume completes the quest of Roland Deschain, the last gunslinger in a world which has "moved on." Like the first book in the series, the last is beautifully illustrated by famed fantasy artist Michael Whelan. And with the same mix of triumph and loss that made Wolves of the Calla a runaway bestseller, The Dark Tower tracks Roland towards his ultimate goal, the tower itself — the center of all time, all place. But this time, as Roland's ka-tet moves through The Dixie Pig in New York City to Algul Siento in End-World, the losses come from within his circle of companions. His antagonists, from Mia's chap Mordred to the force of evil known as the Crimson King, grow more desperate. In the final stage of his search, Roland needs one more ally, a last key to gain entry to the tower. What awaits him there, at the tower's very top, is a mystery sure to awe King's legions of devoted fans.

With Stephen King's unparalleled storytelling power, and with interest in fantasy at an all-time high, the release of The Dark Tower will be the most exciting publishing event of the year.

"Synopsis" by , The final volume of Stephen King's masterful multi-volume epic — hailed as a "hypnotic blend of suspense and sentimentality...a sprawling, eventful tale of demons, monsters, narrow escapes, and magic portals" (The New York Times Book Review).
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