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Other titles in the Between Men~between Women: Lesbian and Gay Studies series:

Recognizing Ourselves : Ceremonies of Lesbian and Gay Commitment (98 Edition)

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Recognizing Ourselves : Ceremonies of Lesbian and Gay Commitment (98 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Lewin explores the intersections of kinship, community, morality, and love bound up in same-sex marriage through the experiences of lesbian and gay couples who have sanctified their relationships in commitment ceremonies. Through detailed profiles, Lewin provides the first comprehensive account of lesbian and gay weddings in America.

Synopsis:

The issue of same-sex marriage has recently come to the publics attention as the federal government and many state legislatures have debated the rights of lesbians and gay men to obtain the legal status or benefits associated with married life. In" Recognizing Ourselves, " Ellen Lewin explores the intersections of kinship, community, morality, and love bound up in same-sex marriage through the experiences of lesbian and gay couples who have sanctified their relationships in commitment ceremonies. Through detailed profiles, Lewin provides the first comprehensive account of lesbian and gay weddings in America. Along the way, she reveals how these ceremonies offer by turns reflections of and challenges to dominant American values.

Synopsis:

In April 1993, as part of the March on Washington for Lesbian, Gay, and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, hundreds of couples participated in the Wedding, a symbolic commitment ceremony held in front of the Internal Revenue Service building. Part protest and part affirmation of devotion, the event was a reminder that marriage rights have become a major issue among lesbians and gay men, who cannot marry legally and can only claim domestic partner rights in a few locations in the United States. Yet despite official lack of recognition, same-sex wedding ceremonies have been increasing in frequency over the past decade.

Ellen Lewin, who has consecrated her own lesbian relationship with a commitment ceremony, decided to explore the myriad ways in which lesbians and gay men create meaningful ceremonies for themselves. She offers the first comprehensive account of lesbian and gay weddings in modern America. A series of richly detailed profiles — the result of extensive interviews and participation in the planning and realization of many of these commitment rituals — is woven together to show how new traditions, and ultimately new families, are emerging within contemporary America.

Just as the book is a moving portrait of same-sex couples today, it is also a significant political document on a new arena in the struggle for lesbian and gay rights. In a larger sense, Lewin's work is about the politics surrounding same-sex marriages and the ramifications for central dimensions of American culture such as kinship, community, morality, and love.

Lewin explores the ceremonies themselves, which range from traditional church weddings to Wicca rituals in the countryside, with portraits of the planning, the joys, and the anxieties that led up to the weddings. She introduces Bob and Mark, a leather fetishist couple who sanctified their love by legally changing their last names and exchanging vows in tuxedos, leather bow ties, and knee-high police boots. In an equally absorbing profile, Lewin describes Khadija, from a working-class black family deeply suspicious of whites (and especially Jews) and Shulamith, raised in a Zionist household. She tells of how the two women struggled to reconcile their widely disparate upbringings and how they ultimately combined elements of African and Jewish traditions in their wedding. These, among many other stories, make Recognizing Ourselves a vivid tapestry of lesbian and gay life in post-Stonewall United States.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780231103930
Author:
Lewin, Ellen
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Subject:
Sociology - Marriage & Family
Subject:
Gay Studies
Subject:
Lesbian Studies
Subject:
Gay
Subject:
Marriage customs and rites
Subject:
Gay couples
Subject:
Gay and Lesbian-General
Publication Date:
19991131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.84x5.61x.88 in. .89 lbs.

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Related Subjects


Gay and Lesbian » Fiction and Poetry » General
History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family

Recognizing Ourselves : Ceremonies of Lesbian and Gay Commitment (98 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.00 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Columbia University Press - English 9780231103930 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The issue of same-sex marriage has recently come to the publics attention as the federal government and many state legislatures have debated the rights of lesbians and gay men to obtain the legal status or benefits associated with married life. In" Recognizing Ourselves, " Ellen Lewin explores the intersections of kinship, community, morality, and love bound up in same-sex marriage through the experiences of lesbian and gay couples who have sanctified their relationships in commitment ceremonies. Through detailed profiles, Lewin provides the first comprehensive account of lesbian and gay weddings in America. Along the way, she reveals how these ceremonies offer by turns reflections of and challenges to dominant American values.
"Synopsis" by , In April 1993, as part of the March on Washington for Lesbian, Gay, and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, hundreds of couples participated in the Wedding, a symbolic commitment ceremony held in front of the Internal Revenue Service building. Part protest and part affirmation of devotion, the event was a reminder that marriage rights have become a major issue among lesbians and gay men, who cannot marry legally and can only claim domestic partner rights in a few locations in the United States. Yet despite official lack of recognition, same-sex wedding ceremonies have been increasing in frequency over the past decade.

Ellen Lewin, who has consecrated her own lesbian relationship with a commitment ceremony, decided to explore the myriad ways in which lesbians and gay men create meaningful ceremonies for themselves. She offers the first comprehensive account of lesbian and gay weddings in modern America. A series of richly detailed profiles — the result of extensive interviews and participation in the planning and realization of many of these commitment rituals — is woven together to show how new traditions, and ultimately new families, are emerging within contemporary America.

Just as the book is a moving portrait of same-sex couples today, it is also a significant political document on a new arena in the struggle for lesbian and gay rights. In a larger sense, Lewin's work is about the politics surrounding same-sex marriages and the ramifications for central dimensions of American culture such as kinship, community, morality, and love.

Lewin explores the ceremonies themselves, which range from traditional church weddings to Wicca rituals in the countryside, with portraits of the planning, the joys, and the anxieties that led up to the weddings. She introduces Bob and Mark, a leather fetishist couple who sanctified their love by legally changing their last names and exchanging vows in tuxedos, leather bow ties, and knee-high police boots. In an equally absorbing profile, Lewin describes Khadija, from a working-class black family deeply suspicious of whites (and especially Jews) and Shulamith, raised in a Zionist household. She tells of how the two women struggled to reconcile their widely disparate upbringings and how they ultimately combined elements of African and Jewish traditions in their wedding. These, among many other stories, make Recognizing Ourselves a vivid tapestry of lesbian and gay life in post-Stonewall United States.

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