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101 Things I Learned in Architecture School

by

101 Things I Learned in Architecture School Cover

 

Staff Pick

This small, pocket-size book, 101 Things I Learned in Architectural School, is a surprise smash hit — over 100,00 copies have been sold since it was published in September 2007. As a working architect and urban planner, Matthew Frederick distills both complicated and simple architectural themes into short paragraphs and line drawings. Even if you're not an architecture student, the philosophy, advice, and engaging lessons will charm and delight you.
Recommended by Carole R., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


This is a book that students of architecture will want to keep in the studio and in their backpacks. It is also a book they may want to keep out of view of their professors, for it expresses in clear and simple language things that tend to be murky and abstruse in the classroom. These 101 concise lessons in design, drawing, the creative process, and presentation (from the basics of "How to Draw a Line" to the complexities of color theory) provide a much-needed primer in architectural literacy, making concrete what too often is left nebulous or open-ended in the architecture curriculum. Each lesson utilizes a two-page format, with a brief explanation and an illustration that can range from diagrammatic to whimsical. The lesson on "How to Draw a Line" is illustrated by examples of good and bad lines; a lesson on the dangers of awkward floor level changes shows the television actor Dick Van Dyke in the midst of a pratfall; a discussion of the proportional differences between traditional and modern buildings features a drawing of a building split neatly in half between the two.

Written by an architect and instructor who remembers well the fog of his own student days, 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School provides valuable guideposts for navigating the design studio and other classes in the architecture curriculum. Architecture graduates, from young designers to experienced practitioners, will turn to the book as well, for inspiration and a guide back to basics when solving a complex design problem.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;Concise lessons in design, drawing, the creative process, and presentation, from the basics of andquot;How to Draw a Lineandquot; to the complexities of color theory.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;This is a book that students of architecture will want to keep in the studio and in their backpacks. It is also a book they may want to keep out of view of their professors, for it expresses in clear and simple language things that tend to be murky and abstruse in the classroom. These 101 concise lessons in design, drawing, the creative process, and presentation--from the basics of andquot;How to Draw a Lineandquot; to the complexities of color theory--provide a much-needed primer in architectural literacy, making concrete what too often is left nebulous or open-ended in the architecture curriculum. Each lesson utilizes a two-page format, with a brief explanation and an illustration that can range from diagrammatic to whimsical. The lesson on andquot;How to Draw a Lineandquot; is illustrated by examples of good and bad lines; a lesson on the dangers of awkward floor level changes shows the television actor Dick Van Dyke in the midst of a pratfall; a discussion of the proportional differences between traditional and modern buildings features a drawing of a building split neatly in half between the two. Written by an architect and instructor who remembers well the fog of his own student days, 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School provides valuable guideposts for navigating the design studio and other classes in the architecture curriculum. Architecture graduates--from young designers to experienced practitioners--will turn to the book as well, for inspiration and a guide back to basics when solving a complex design problem.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

This is a book that students of architecture will want to keep in the studio and in their backpacks. It is also a book they may want to keep out of view of their professors, for it expresses in clear and simple language things that tend to be murky and abstruse in the classroom. These 101 concise lessons in design, drawing, the creative process, and presentation--from the basics of "How to Draw a Line" to the complexities of color theory--provide a much-needed primer in architectural literacy, making concrete what too often is left nebulous or open-ended in the architecture curriculum. Each lesson utilizes a two-page format, with a brief explanation and an illustration that can range from diagrammatic to whimsical. The lesson on "How to Draw a Line" is illustrated by examples of good and bad lines; a lesson on the dangers of awkward floor level changes shows the television actor Dick Van Dyke in the midst of a pratfall; a discussion of the proportional differences between traditional and modern buildings features a drawing of a building split neatly in half between the two. Written by an architect and instructor who remembers well the fog of his own student days, 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School provides valuable guideposts for navigating the design studio and other classes in the architecture curriculum. Architecture graduates--from young designers to experienced practitioners--will turn to the book as well, for inspiration and a guide back to basics when solving a complex design problem.

About the Author

Matthew Frederick is an architect and urban designer in Cambridge,Massachusetts. He has taught at a number of colleges and universities,including Boston Architectural College and Wentworth Institute ofTechnology.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262062664
Author:
Frederick, Matthew
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Author:
Frederick, Matthew
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
Study & Teaching
Subject:
Architecture
Subject:
Architectural design
Subject:
Architecture -- Study and teaching.
Subject:
Architectural design -- Study and teaching.
Subject:
ARCHITECTURE / Reference
Copyright:
Series:
101 Things I Learned in Architecture School
Publication Date:
September 2007
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
101 band#38;w illus.
Pages:
216
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in

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101 Things I Learned in Architecture School Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.50 In Stock
Product details 216 pages Mit Press - English 9780262062664 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

This small, pocket-size book, 101 Things I Learned in Architectural School, is a surprise smash hit — over 100,00 copies have been sold since it was published in September 2007. As a working architect and urban planner, Matthew Frederick distills both complicated and simple architectural themes into short paragraphs and line drawings. Even if you're not an architecture student, the philosophy, advice, and engaging lessons will charm and delight you.

"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;Concise lessons in design, drawing, the creative process, and presentation, from the basics of andquot;How to Draw a Lineandquot; to the complexities of color theory.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;This is a book that students of architecture will want to keep in the studio and in their backpacks. It is also a book they may want to keep out of view of their professors, for it expresses in clear and simple language things that tend to be murky and abstruse in the classroom. These 101 concise lessons in design, drawing, the creative process, and presentation--from the basics of andquot;How to Draw a Lineandquot; to the complexities of color theory--provide a much-needed primer in architectural literacy, making concrete what too often is left nebulous or open-ended in the architecture curriculum. Each lesson utilizes a two-page format, with a brief explanation and an illustration that can range from diagrammatic to whimsical. The lesson on andquot;How to Draw a Lineandquot; is illustrated by examples of good and bad lines; a lesson on the dangers of awkward floor level changes shows the television actor Dick Van Dyke in the midst of a pratfall; a discussion of the proportional differences between traditional and modern buildings features a drawing of a building split neatly in half between the two. Written by an architect and instructor who remembers well the fog of his own student days, 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School provides valuable guideposts for navigating the design studio and other classes in the architecture curriculum. Architecture graduates--from young designers to experienced practitioners--will turn to the book as well, for inspiration and a guide back to basics when solving a complex design problem.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , This is a book that students of architecture will want to keep in the studio and in their backpacks. It is also a book they may want to keep out of view of their professors, for it expresses in clear and simple language things that tend to be murky and abstruse in the classroom. These 101 concise lessons in design, drawing, the creative process, and presentation--from the basics of "How to Draw a Line" to the complexities of color theory--provide a much-needed primer in architectural literacy, making concrete what too often is left nebulous or open-ended in the architecture curriculum. Each lesson utilizes a two-page format, with a brief explanation and an illustration that can range from diagrammatic to whimsical. The lesson on "How to Draw a Line" is illustrated by examples of good and bad lines; a lesson on the dangers of awkward floor level changes shows the television actor Dick Van Dyke in the midst of a pratfall; a discussion of the proportional differences between traditional and modern buildings features a drawing of a building split neatly in half between the two. Written by an architect and instructor who remembers well the fog of his own student days, 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School provides valuable guideposts for navigating the design studio and other classes in the architecture curriculum. Architecture graduates--from young designers to experienced practitioners--will turn to the book as well, for inspiration and a guide back to basics when solving a complex design problem.
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