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The Panopticon

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The Panopticon Cover

ISBN13: 9780385347952
ISBN10: 0385347952
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Named one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists

Anais Hendricks, fifteen, is in the back of a police car. She is headed for the Panopticon, a home for chronic young offenders. She can't remember what’s happened, but across town a policewoman lies in a coma and Anais is covered in blood. Raised in foster care from birth and moved through twenty-three placements before she even turned seven, Anais has been let down by just about every adult she has ever met. Now a counterculture outlaw, she knows that she can only rely on herself. And yet despite the parade of horrors visited upon her early life, she greets the world with the witty, fierce insight of a survivor.

Anais finds a sense of belonging among the residents of the Panopticon — they form intense bonds, and she soon becomes part of an ad-hoc family. Together, they struggle against the adults that keep them confined. But when she looks up at the watchtower that looms over the residents, Anais realizes her fate: She is an anonymous part of an experiment, and she always was. Now it seems that the experiment is closing in.

Now with Extra Libris material, including a reader’s guide and bonus content

Shortlisted for The Desmond Elliott Award

Shortlisted for The James Tait Black Prize

Shortlisted for the Dundee International Book Prize

Review:

“Anais's ongoing internal dialog, her periodic reimagining of her life and situation, is entralling....James Kelman's How Late It Was, How Late meets Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cukoo's Nest. Not to be missed.”  Library Journal (starred review)

Review:

“Dark and disturbing but also exciting and moving, thanks to a memorable heroine and vividly atmospheric prose….Fagan [paints] her battered characters’ fierce loyalty to each other with such conviction and surprising tenderness.” Kirkus Reviews

Review:

“Told in Anais’ raw voice, Fagan’s novel peers into the world inhabited by forgotten children, and, in Anais, gives us a heartbreakingly intelligent and sensitive heroine wrapped in an impossibly impenetrable exterior. Readers won’t be able to tear themselves away from this transcendent debut.” Booklist (starred review)

Review:

“Anais’s story is one of abandonment, loss, and redemption, well suited for a paranoid age in which society finds itself constantly under the microscope.” Publishers Weekly

Review:

“Fagan has created a feisty, brass-knuckled yet deeply vulnerable heroine, who feels like sort of a cross between Lisbeth Salander, Stieg Larsson’s Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and one of Irvine Welsh’s drug-taking Scottish miscreants from Trainspotting or Skagboys. Her novel is by turns gritty, unnerving, exhausting, [and] ferocious....A deeply felt and genuinely affecting novel.” Michiko Kakutani, New York Times

Review:

“Fagan has given us one of the most spirited heroines to cuss, kiss, bite and generally break the nose of the English novel in many a moon...there is no resisting the tidal rollout of Fagan’s imagery. Her prose beats behind your eyelids, the flow of images widening to a glittering delta whenever Anais approaches the vexed issue of her origins...vive Jenni Fagan...whose next book just moved into my ‘eagerly anticipated’ pile.” Tom Shone, New York Times Book Review

Review:

“[Fagan] grew up in what’s euphemistically called ‘the care system,’ and she writes about these young people with a deep sympathy for their violently disordered lives and an equally deep appreciation of their humor and resiliency....[Fagan has a] rousing voice, with its roundly rendered Scottish accent.” Ron Charles, Washington Post

Review:

The Panopticon [is] a terrifically gritty and vivid debut.” Cleveland Plain Dealer

Review:

“[A] terrific portrait of a young criminal....Fagan makes this ugly life somehow beautiful.” Alan Cheuse, NPR

About the Author

Jenni Fagan was born in Livingston, Scotland. She graduated from Greenwich University and won a scholarship to the Royal Holloway MFA. A published poet, she has won awards from Arts Council England, Dewar Arts and Scottish Screen among others. She has twice been nominated for the Pushcart Prize, was shortlisted for the Dundee International Book Prize, and was named one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists in 2013. The Panopticon is her first novel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Ellen Etc, June 9, 2014 (view all comments by Ellen Etc)
Anais has been under state care in her home country (Scotland) for her entire life. She’s incorrigible and is charged with putting a Police Constable into a coma -- and given her bad attitude and street skills, she could have done it. Now 15, for the duration of the investigation Anais has been transferred to a state home for teenagers, the Panopticon, a facility built as a prison with open cells around a central watchtower. Who is watching these clients? Where did Anais come from, really?
Reminding me of nothing so much as "The Death of Bunny Munro" by Nick Cave in its randomness, inevitability, and impact, "The Panopticon" is a novel of a wayward soul, self-medicating and resourceful, one with gritty determination to survive against hopeless odds.

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(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
lukas, May 13, 2014 (view all comments by lukas)
The panopticon was a type of prison created by English writer/thinker Jeremy Bentham, who described it as “a new mode of obtaining power of mind over mind, in a quantity hitherto without example." Later, controversial philosopher Michel Foucault used it as a metaphor for control. This book is not as interesting as these guys and squanders a good premise. Oh, hope you're comfortable with the c-word.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780385347952
Author:
Fagan, Jenni
Publisher:
Hogarth
Subject:
Literature-Coming of Age
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20140431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.69 x 0.89 in 0.74 lb
Age Level:
Literature-Coming of Age

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Coming of Age

The Panopticon Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Hogarth - English 9780385347952 Reviews:
"Review" by , “Anais's ongoing internal dialog, her periodic reimagining of her life and situation, is entralling....James Kelman's How Late It Was, How Late meets Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cukoo's Nest. Not to be missed.” 
"Review" by , “Dark and disturbing but also exciting and moving, thanks to a memorable heroine and vividly atmospheric prose….Fagan [paints] her battered characters’ fierce loyalty to each other with such conviction and surprising tenderness.”
"Review" by , “Told in Anais’ raw voice, Fagan’s novel peers into the world inhabited by forgotten children, and, in Anais, gives us a heartbreakingly intelligent and sensitive heroine wrapped in an impossibly impenetrable exterior. Readers won’t be able to tear themselves away from this transcendent debut.”
"Review" by , “Anais’s story is one of abandonment, loss, and redemption, well suited for a paranoid age in which society finds itself constantly under the microscope.”
"Review" by , “Fagan has created a feisty, brass-knuckled yet deeply vulnerable heroine, who feels like sort of a cross between Lisbeth Salander, Stieg Larsson’s Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and one of Irvine Welsh’s drug-taking Scottish miscreants from Trainspotting or Skagboys. Her novel is by turns gritty, unnerving, exhausting, [and] ferocious....A deeply felt and genuinely affecting novel.”
"Review" by , “Fagan has given us one of the most spirited heroines to cuss, kiss, bite and generally break the nose of the English novel in many a moon...there is no resisting the tidal rollout of Fagan’s imagery. Her prose beats behind your eyelids, the flow of images widening to a glittering delta whenever Anais approaches the vexed issue of her origins...vive Jenni Fagan...whose next book just moved into my ‘eagerly anticipated’ pile.”
"Review" by , “[Fagan] grew up in what’s euphemistically called ‘the care system,’ and she writes about these young people with a deep sympathy for their violently disordered lives and an equally deep appreciation of their humor and resiliency....[Fagan has a] rousing voice, with its roundly rendered Scottish accent.”
"Review" by , The Panopticon [is] a terrifically gritty and vivid debut.”
"Review" by , “[A] terrific portrait of a young criminal....Fagan makes this ugly life somehow beautiful.”
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