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Dairy Queen

by

Dairy Queen Cover

ISBN13: 9780618863358
ISBN10: 0618863354
Condition:
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When you don't talk, there's a lot of stuff that ends up not getting said. Harsh words indeed, from Brian Nelson of all people. But, D. J. can't help admitting, maybe he's right.

When you don't talk, there's a lot of stuff that ends up not getting said. Stuff like why her best friend, Amber, isn't so friendly anymore. Or why her little brother, Curtis, never opens his mouth. Why her mom has two jobs and a big secret. Why her college-football-star brothers won't even call home. Why her dad would go ballistic if she tried out for the high school football team herself. And why Brian is so, so out of her league.

When you don't talk, there's a lot of stuff that ends up not getting said. Welcome to the summer that fifteen-year-old D. J. Schwenk of Red Bend, Wisconsin, learns to talk, and ends up having an awful lot of stuff to say.

Review:

"If you ask 15-year-old tomboy D.J. Schwenk, summer is off to a lousy start. But, since she's not real big on talking and neither is anyone in her family no one's likely to hear or understand her complaints. D.J. is saddled with all the chores at the Schwenk dairy farm while her father recuperates from an injury, her mother takes on extra work at the local school and her older, football-legend brothers stay away from home due to a family rift. Then Brian Nelson, the conceited quarterback from D.J.'s rival high school, is assigned by his coach (and Schwenk family friend) to help out on the farm. Sparks of all kinds, and cow pies, fly as D.J. and Brian eventually bond over work and football, and D.J. tries out for her own school's varsity team. Moore does an excellent job of mastering a natural, Midwestern accent that whisks listeners right to Wisconsin. She's wholly believable as a teenager struggling with attitudes about first love, friendship, gender and sexuality, self-confidence and sports. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Readers will learn a lot about sports and farming but more about taking charge of oneself." VOYA

Review:

"This is a highly readable novel with interesting characters and a valuable theme of learning to express emotions and reach out to others." KLIATT

Review:

"[As] enjoyable as any treat from the real DQ." School Library Journal

Synopsis:

Maddie lives in a world where everything is done on the computer. Whether its to go to school or on a date, people dont venture out of their home. Theres really no need. For the most part, Maddies okay with the solitary, digital lifeuntil she meets Justin. Justin likes being with people. He enjoys the physical closeness of face-to-face interactions. People arent meant to be alone, he tells her. Suddenly, Maddie feels something awakening inside hera feeling that maybe there is a different, better way to live. But with society and her parents telling her otherwise, Maddie is going to have to learn to stand up for herself if she wants to change the path her life is taking. In this not-so-brave new world, two young people struggle to carve out their own space.

Synopsis:

In the year 2060, everything is done digitally. Kids no longer go to schools. They stay home and take classes online. Adults work from home, too. Even dating is no longer done in person. Why walk on a real beach when you can stroll down a digitally remastered one instead? No bad weather, no seagulls, nothing real to ruin a perfectly fine time.
 
Though she's grown up in this digital world, something about being cut off from everyone doesn't sit right with seventeen-year-old Madeline. Her favorite activity--the only one she does off line--is soccer. She likes the physicality of it and the comradery with the other girls.
 
Then she meets Justin. He, too, prefers life off line. It's all he talks about. He even takes her out to a real coffee shop and an underground club. Maybe it's his attentiveness, or the physical closeness of actually being with someone, or just that he's very good looking, Madie is definitely drawn to him. But there's also something very aloof about him, like perhaps he's hiding something.
 
When Madie uncovers the truth, she's faced with the question: What's more important, fighting for what you believe in or love?

About the Author

Though she never played high school football or milked cows, Catherine Gilbert Murdock is a big fan of family farms and Wisconsin. She herself grew up on a tiny farm (two goats and honeybees) in Connecticut, and attended Bryn Mawr College and the University of Pennsylvania. She now lives in suburban Philadelphia with her husband, two children, and Sparky the cat. Dairy Queen is her first novel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

heath bar, May 16, 2011 (view all comments by heath bar)
Nothing is going right for D.J. Schwenk. Her dad messed up his hip working on their farm, her best friend, Amber, is not very nice any more, her older brothers have moved out, she has to work with Brian Nelson, and she feels like a cow. Now, D.J. has to run her family’s farm all by herself and put up with Brian, the quarter back of Hawley‘s football team, her town’s archrival. Over the summer, D.J. and Brian work on Schwenk Farm and D.J. starts training Brian for football tryouts. D.J. begins to really enjoy football.

During the summer, she realizes that everyone is making decisions for her; just like she does for her cows. She says, “Then I started thinking that maybe everyone in the whole world was just like a cow, and we all go along doing what we’re supposed to without complaining or even really noticing, until we die.” D.J. really wants to make her own decisions. So, she tries out for the football team. After this, D.J. says, “The feeling of freedom this gave me ��" I can’t even describe it. It was my decision. I chose it. I am not a cow.” In Dairy Queen, D.J. learns that no one and nothing can hold her back from her dreams if she sets her mind to it. Readers will walk away from this book looking up to D.J., inspired to make their own decisions, and will immediately begin reading the sequel. I would recommend this book to any reader that needs some inspiration, a boost in self-confidence, or a good laugh.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
cr_harvey94, July 7, 2007 (view all comments by cr_harvey94)
Okay, i loved this book, i just hated the ending, i hated how the ending left you not knowing what happends. The book was great the characters beliveable, but i was just so disspointed about the ending. If your all about good endings this book is not for you.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780618863358
Author:
Murdock, Catherine Gilbert
Publisher:
Graphia Books
Author:
Murdock, Catherine
Author:
Kacvinsky, Katie
Location:
Boston
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Football
Subject:
Farm life
Subject:
Social Issues - General
Subject:
Family - General
Subject:
Love & Romance
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
Girls & Women
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
June 2007
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 7 up to 12
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
12-17

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Related Subjects

Children's » Featured Titles
Children's » Oregon Battle of the Books
Children's » Sale Books
Children's » Situations » General
Children's » Sports and Outdoors » Sports Fiction » Football
Children's » Sports and Outdoors » Sports Fiction » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Emotions and Feelings
Young Adult » General

Dairy Queen Sale Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.98 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Graphia Books - English 9780618863358 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "If you ask 15-year-old tomboy D.J. Schwenk, summer is off to a lousy start. But, since she's not real big on talking and neither is anyone in her family no one's likely to hear or understand her complaints. D.J. is saddled with all the chores at the Schwenk dairy farm while her father recuperates from an injury, her mother takes on extra work at the local school and her older, football-legend brothers stay away from home due to a family rift. Then Brian Nelson, the conceited quarterback from D.J.'s rival high school, is assigned by his coach (and Schwenk family friend) to help out on the farm. Sparks of all kinds, and cow pies, fly as D.J. and Brian eventually bond over work and football, and D.J. tries out for her own school's varsity team. Moore does an excellent job of mastering a natural, Midwestern accent that whisks listeners right to Wisconsin. She's wholly believable as a teenager struggling with attitudes about first love, friendship, gender and sexuality, self-confidence and sports. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Readers will learn a lot about sports and farming but more about taking charge of oneself."
"Review" by , "This is a highly readable novel with interesting characters and a valuable theme of learning to express emotions and reach out to others."
"Review" by , "[As] enjoyable as any treat from the real DQ."
"Synopsis" by ,
Maddie lives in a world where everything is done on the computer. Whether its to go to school or on a date, people dont venture out of their home. Theres really no need. For the most part, Maddies okay with the solitary, digital lifeuntil she meets Justin. Justin likes being with people. He enjoys the physical closeness of face-to-face interactions. People arent meant to be alone, he tells her. Suddenly, Maddie feels something awakening inside hera feeling that maybe there is a different, better way to live. But with society and her parents telling her otherwise, Maddie is going to have to learn to stand up for herself if she wants to change the path her life is taking. In this not-so-brave new world, two young people struggle to carve out their own space.
"Synopsis" by ,
In the year 2060, everything is done digitally. Kids no longer go to schools. They stay home and take classes online. Adults work from home, too. Even dating is no longer done in person. Why walk on a real beach when you can stroll down a digitally remastered one instead? No bad weather, no seagulls, nothing real to ruin a perfectly fine time.
 
Though she's grown up in this digital world, something about being cut off from everyone doesn't sit right with seventeen-year-old Madeline. Her favorite activity--the only one she does off line--is soccer. She likes the physicality of it and the comradery with the other girls.
 
Then she meets Justin. He, too, prefers life off line. It's all he talks about. He even takes her out to a real coffee shop and an underground club. Maybe it's his attentiveness, or the physical closeness of actually being with someone, or just that he's very good looking, Madie is definitely drawn to him. But there's also something very aloof about him, like perhaps he's hiding something.
 
When Madie uncovers the truth, she's faced with the question: What's more important, fighting for what you believe in or love?
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