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A Pint of Plain: Tradition, Change, and the Fate of the Irish Pub

by

A Pint of Plain: Tradition, Change, and the Fate of the Irish Pub Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Seamlessly blending history and reportage, Bill Barich offers a heartfelt homage to the traditional Irish pub, and to the central piece of Irish culture disappearing along with it.

After meeting an I rishwoman in London and moving to Dublin, Bill Barich—a “blow-in,” or stranger, in Irish parlance—found himself looking for a traditional I rish pub to be his local. There are nearly twelve thousand pubs in Ireland, so he appeared to have plenty of choices. He wanted a pub like the one in John Fords classic movie, The Quiet Man, offering talk and drink with no distractions, but such pubs are now scare as publicans increasingly rely on flat-screen televisions, rock music, even Texas Hold Em to attract a dwindling clientele. For Barich, this signaled that something deeper was at play—an erosion of the essence of Ireland, perhaps without the Irish even being aware.

A Pint of Plain is Barichs witty, deeply observant portrait of an Ireland vanishing before our eyes. Drawing on the wit and wisdom of Flann OBrien (the title comes from one of his poems), James Joyce, Brendan Behan, and J. M. Synge, Barich explores how I rish culture has become a commodity for exports for such firms as the I rish Pub Company, which has built some five hundred “authentic” Irish pubs in forty-five countries, where “authenticity is in the eye of the beholder.” The tale of Arthur Guinness and the famous brewery he founded in the mid-eighteenth century reveals the astonishing fact that more stout is sold in Nigeria than in Ireland itself. While 85 percent of the I rish still stop by a pub at least once a month, strict drunk-driving laws have helped to kill business in rural areas. Even traditional I rish music, whose rich roots “connect the past to the present and close a circle,” is much less prominent in pub life. I ronically, while I rish pubs in the countryside are closing at the alarming rate of one per day, plastic I PC-type pubs are being born in foreign countries at the exact same rate.

From the famed watering holes of Dublin to tiny village pubs, Barich introduces a colorful array of characters, and, ever pursuing craic, the ineffable Irish word for a good time, engages in an unvarnished yet affectionate discussion about what it means to be Irish today.

Review:

"All that the author, a California transplant, wanted was to find the perfect pub in his Dublin neighborhood, an easy task since Barich had 'been in training for the job most of my life.' What should be a breeze morphs into a countrywide pub crawl and journalistic investigation, as the author discovers that the romanticized Irish pub of The Quiet Man has become commercialized, while stricter drunk driving laws and Ireland's changing social dynamics don't bode well for the future of the places beloved by everyone from Joyce to the working class. Barich (Laughing in the Hills) also talks about the various aspects of Irish pub culture, from its music to its literary denizens. Barich crams in a lot of intriguing elements — history, sociology, autobiography, travelogue, character study — without deciding on a focus. Consequently, his effort feels less like a book than a collection of loosely connected facts and observations, which gradually languish as the author strays from the revelatory and informative (e.g., the nutritional qualities of Guinness; Ireland's attempts at temperance) for the quaint." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Seamlessly blending history and reportage, Barich offers a heartfelt homage to the traditional Irish pub, and to the central piece of Irish culture disappearing along with it.

Synopsis:

“Shhhhhh…Dont tell, but this is really a book about globalization, not about ‘yer only man (i.e., the well-pulled pint of porter). With ‘Oirish pubs cropping up in every burg and burb, what has happened to the originals?…An excellent, however sneaky, addition to the literature of globalization.”—Booklist

A Pint of Plain is Bill Barichs witty, deeply observant portrait of an Ireland vanishing before our eyes. Drawing on the wit and wisdom of OBrien, Joyce, Behan, and Synge, Barich explores how Irish culture has become a commodity for export. While Irish pubs in the countryside are closing at the alarming rate of one per day, replicas are being born in foreign countries at the same rate. From the famed watering holes of Dublin to tiny village pubs, Barich introduces a colorful array of characters, and engages in an unvarnished yet affectionate discussion about what it means to be Irish today.

About the Author

Bill Barich has written for the New Yorker and other publications for many years. He is the author of the classic Laughing in the Hills, as well as Crazy for Rivers, Carson Valley, and most recently A Fine Place to Daydream: Racehorses, Romance, and the Irish. He lives in Dublin, Ireland.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802717016
Subtitle:
Tradition, Change, and the Fate of the Irish Pub
Author:
Barich, Bill
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Subject:
History
Subject:
Bars (Drinking establishments)
Subject:
Industries - Hospitality, Travel & Tourism
Subject:
General
Subject:
Europe - Ireland
Subject:
General Travel
Subject:
Beverages - Wine & Spirits
Subject:
Ireland
Subject:
Bars (Drinking establishments) - Ireland -
Subject:
Beverages/Wine
Subject:
Spirits
Subject:
Business Writing
Subject:
Beverages - Beer
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20100202
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
bandw illustrations throughout
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.54 x 5.75 x 0.965 in

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Related Subjects


Business » General
Business » Management
Business » Writing
Cooking and Food » Beverages » Bartending and Liquor
Cooking and Food » Beverages » Wine » General
Cooking and Food » Beverages » Wine » Wines of the World
Cooking and Food » Beverages » Wines and Beer
Travel » Europe » Ireland
Travel » Travel Writing » Europe
Travel » Travel Writing » General

A Pint of Plain: Tradition, Change, and the Fate of the Irish Pub Sale Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.98 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Walker & Company - English 9780802717016 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "All that the author, a California transplant, wanted was to find the perfect pub in his Dublin neighborhood, an easy task since Barich had 'been in training for the job most of my life.' What should be a breeze morphs into a countrywide pub crawl and journalistic investigation, as the author discovers that the romanticized Irish pub of The Quiet Man has become commercialized, while stricter drunk driving laws and Ireland's changing social dynamics don't bode well for the future of the places beloved by everyone from Joyce to the working class. Barich (Laughing in the Hills) also talks about the various aspects of Irish pub culture, from its music to its literary denizens. Barich crams in a lot of intriguing elements — history, sociology, autobiography, travelogue, character study — without deciding on a focus. Consequently, his effort feels less like a book than a collection of loosely connected facts and observations, which gradually languish as the author strays from the revelatory and informative (e.g., the nutritional qualities of Guinness; Ireland's attempts at temperance) for the quaint." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Seamlessly blending history and reportage, Barich offers a heartfelt homage to the traditional Irish pub, and to the central piece of Irish culture disappearing along with it.
"Synopsis" by ,
“Shhhhhh…Dont tell, but this is really a book about globalization, not about ‘yer only man (i.e., the well-pulled pint of porter). With ‘Oirish pubs cropping up in every burg and burb, what has happened to the originals?…An excellent, however sneaky, addition to the literature of globalization.”—Booklist

A Pint of Plain is Bill Barichs witty, deeply observant portrait of an Ireland vanishing before our eyes. Drawing on the wit and wisdom of OBrien, Joyce, Behan, and Synge, Barich explores how Irish culture has become a commodity for export. While Irish pubs in the countryside are closing at the alarming rate of one per day, replicas are being born in foreign countries at the same rate. From the famed watering holes of Dublin to tiny village pubs, Barich introduces a colorful array of characters, and engages in an unvarnished yet affectionate discussion about what it means to be Irish today.

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