Tournament of Books 2015
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | January 14, 2015

    Marie Mutsuki Mockett: IMG On Trimming Roses



    Gardens do not wait. Weeds grow and flowers wilt. In the days and weeks following my father's death, my parents' garden continued to flourish and... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$3.97
Sale Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Middle East- Iraq
30 Local Warehouse Middle East- Iraq

Unintended Consequences: How War in Iraq Strengthened America's Enemies

by

Unintended Consequences: How War in Iraq Strengthened America's Enemies Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Called by New York Times columnist David Brooks the "smartest and most devastating" critic of President George W. Bush's Iraq policies, Peter Galbraith was the earliest expert to describe Iraq's breakup into religious and ethnic entities, a reality now commonly accepted.

The Iraq war was intended to make the United States more secure, bring democracy to the Middle East, intimidate Iran and Syria, help win the war on terror, consolidate American world leadership, and entrench the Republican Party for decades. Instead,

  • Bush handed Iran its greatest strategic triumph in four centuries
  • U.S. troops now fight to support an Iraqi government led by religious parties intent on creating an Iranian-style Islamic republic
  • As part of the surge, the United States created a Sunni militia led by the same Baathists the U.S. invaded Iraq to overthrow administration gave Iran and North Korea a free pass to advance their nuclear programs
  • Obsessed with Iraq's nonexistent WMD, the Bush administration gave Iran and North Korea a free pass to advance their nuclear programs
  • Turkey, a key NANATO ally long considered a model pro-Western Muslim democracy, became one of the most anti-American countries in the world
  • U.S. prestige around the world reached an all-time low

Iraq: Galbraith challenges the assertion that the surge will lead to victory. By creating a Sunni army, the surge has, in fact, contributed to Iraq's breakup and set the stage for an intensified civil war between Sunnis and Shiites. If the United States wishes to escape the Iraq quagmire, it must face up to the reality that the country has broken up and cannot be put back together.

Iran: Having helped Iran's allies take control in Baghdad, the Bush administration no longer has a viable military option to stop Iran's nuclear program. Galbraith discusses how a president more pragmatic than Bush might get Iran to freeze its nuclear program as part of a package deal to upgrade relations between two countries equally threatened by Sunni extremism.

Turkey, Syria, and Israel: A war intended to make Israel more secure, undermine Syria's Assad regime, and strengthen ties with Turkey has had the opposite result.

Nationalism: In the coming decades, other countries may follow Iraq's example in fragmenting along ethnic and religious lines. Galbraith draws on his considerable experience in Iraq and the former Yugoslavia to predict where and what the United States might do about it.

The United States: George W. Bush substituted wishful thinking for strategy and as a result made America weaker. Galbraith provides some rules for a national strategy that will appeal equally to conservatives and liberals — indeed, to anyone who believes the United States needs an effective national security strategy.

Review:

"Galbraith (The End of Iraq) surveys the occupation in its fifthyear with a withering eye and strong words for optimists who regard the 'surge' as a road to victory ('Less violence is not the same as winning'). The author efficiently retraces the strategic failures and what he views as the perilous arrogance of the Bush administration, arguing that the war has achieved the opposite of many of its stated objectives: Israel is not safer and Middle Eastern regimes seem still to be moving in an antidemocratic direction. Galbraith admits that his mind has been changed on one or two tactical points — he previously advocated for the immediate withdrawal of U.S. troops; now, given the change in circumstances on the ground, 'Baghdad is one of the last places from which the U.S. should withdraw.' The author flexes his intellectual muscle in a provocative discussion of a possible Iraqi 'three-state-solution,' whereby the country would be divided by ethnic group — an extreme measure that he believes might stabilize the region." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

About the Author

Peter W. Galbraith served as the first U.S. Ambassador to Croatia. He is currently the Senior Diplomatic Fellow at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. He lives in Townshend, Vermont.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781416562252
Subtitle:
How War in Iraq Strengthened America's Enemies
Author:
Galbraith, Peter W
Author:
Galbraith, Peter W.
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Subject:
United States - 21st Century
Subject:
History
Subject:
Ethnic relations
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - International Secur
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Military - Iraq War (2003-)
Subject:
Iraq War, 2003
Subject:
Iraq - History - 1991-2003
Copyright:
Publication Date:
September 2008
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.74x6.64x.85 in. .74 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. In search of the Dark Ages Used Hardcover $6.95
  2. Shakespeare: The World as Stage...
    Used Trade Paper $5.50

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Middle East » Iraq
History and Social Science » Military » Iraq War (2003-)
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » World History » General

Unintended Consequences: How War in Iraq Strengthened America's Enemies Sale Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.97 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781416562252 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Galbraith (The End of Iraq) surveys the occupation in its fifthyear with a withering eye and strong words for optimists who regard the 'surge' as a road to victory ('Less violence is not the same as winning'). The author efficiently retraces the strategic failures and what he views as the perilous arrogance of the Bush administration, arguing that the war has achieved the opposite of many of its stated objectives: Israel is not safer and Middle Eastern regimes seem still to be moving in an antidemocratic direction. Galbraith admits that his mind has been changed on one or two tactical points — he previously advocated for the immediate withdrawal of U.S. troops; now, given the change in circumstances on the ground, 'Baghdad is one of the last places from which the U.S. should withdraw.' The author flexes his intellectual muscle in a provocative discussion of a possible Iraqi 'three-state-solution,' whereby the country would be divided by ethnic group — an extreme measure that he believes might stabilize the region." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.