Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Q&A | February 27, 2014

Rene Denfeld: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Rene Denfeld



Describe your latest book. The Enchanted is a story narrated by a man on death row. The novel was inspired by my work as a death penalty... Continue »
  1. $18.19 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Enchanted

    Rene Denfeld 9780062285508

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.95
List price: $25.00
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Beaverton Self Help- Anxiety and Phobias
2 Hawthorne Psychology- Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety

by

Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety Cover

ISBN13: 9781439177303
ISBN10: 1439177309
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An uplifting and insightful memoir of living with anxiety — the most common psychiatric complaint in the United States — and one man's unswerving quest to overcome it.

• The first of its kind: More than 40 million American adults suffer from anxiety, yet there has never been a memoir about it. Daniel Smith candidly recounts his own hilarious and heart-wrenching story: his first severe episode of anxiety at the age of sixteen; his first job, as a fact-checker at The Atlantic Monthly, which nearly drove him to distraction; and his romantic struggles to keep the love of his life. Through drugs, through psychoanalysis, through self-imposed isolation and cognitive therapy and Zen meditation, he finally learns to make peace with the workings of his restless mind and becomes the husband and father that he wants to be.

• Hope at last: Though Smith is unflinching in his description of anxiety's toll — insomnia, headaches, nausea, constant emotional turmoil — this is far from a sob story. After all, he says, anxiety is first and foremost a disease of absurdity, the human mind's wild imaginings of implausible ways things might go wrong. Through knowing humor and personal anecdotes delivered with a biting insight that calls to mind David Sedaris and Augusten Burroughs, Monkey Mind empowers readers to "declaw the experience" so they can learn to live with — and laugh at — their anxiety.

• Out in the open: What Darkness Visible did for depression and The Year of Magical Thinking did for grief, Monkey Mind will do for anxiety, giving readers a way to talk about, confront, and ultimately quell their demons.

Review:

"Anxiety is no laughing matter, yet afflicted journalist and editor Smith uses humor (such as his use of maxi pads to stem his profuse armpit sweat) as he explains the excess of thought and emotion also known as 'Monkey Mind' in Buddhism. He traces its roots to his psychotherapist mother, a woman whose life is riddled with attacks she actively works to overcome in her 40s. Smith's attacks are exacerbated by the loss of his virginity in a menage a  trois with two predatory older women whose advances he's too angst-ridden to rebuff. Smith also reflects on college, where the abundance of freedom and absence of personal space induces frequent tear-choked calls home. After graduation, he embarks on his first romance and lands a fact-checking job at the Atlantic. There, he writes his first article, which results in a libel lawsuit. When his two-year relationship falls apart, he steps out of his stress-addled head long enough to heed the advice of his therapist. Reading the harsh comments posted online about his article and tracking his thoughts and behavior for triggers helps him reroute his psychological circuitry and win his ex back. Smith does a skillful job of dissecting the mechanics of anxiety as well as placing the reader in his fitful shoes. Agent, Melanie Jackson. (July)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Monkey Mind does for anxiety what William Styron's Darkness Visible did for depression." Aaron T. Beck, father of cognitive therapy

Review:

"I don't know Daniel Smith, but I do want to give him a hug. His book is so bracingly honest, so hilarious, so sharp, it's clear there's one thing he doesn't have to be anxious about: Whether or not he's a great writer." A.J. Jacobs, author of Drop Dead Healthy and The Year of Living Biblically

Review:

"Daniel Smith has a written a wise, funny book, a great mix of startling memoir and fascinating medical and literary history, all of it delivered with humor and a true generosity of spirit. I only got anxious in the last part, when I worried the book would end." Sam Lipsyte, author of Home Land and The Ask

Review:

"You don't need a Jewish mother, or a profound sweating problem, to feel Daniel Smith's pain in Monkey Mind. His memoir treats what must be the essential ailment of our time — chronic anxiety — and it does so with wisdom, honesty, and the kind of belly laughs that can only come from troubles transformed." Chad Harbach, author of The Art of Fielding

Review:

"Daniel Smith maps the jagged contours of anxiety with such insight, humor and compassion that the result is, oddly, calming. There are countless gems in these pages, including a fresh take on the psycho-pathology of chronic nail biting, an ill-fated menage a trois — and the funniest perspiration scene since Albert Brooks' sweaty performance in Broadcast News. Read this book. You have nothing to lose but your heart palpitations, and your Xanax habit." Eric Weiner, author of The Geography of Bliss

Review:

"I read Monkey Mind with admiration for its bravery and clarity. Daniel Smith's anxiety is matched by a wonderful sense of the comic, and it is this which makes Monkey Mind not only a dark, pain-filled book but a hilariously funny one, too. I broke out into explosive laughter again and again." Oliver Sacks, bestselling author of The Mind's Eye and Musicophilia

Review:

"A true treasure-trove of insight laced with humor and polished prose." Kirkus Reviews (starred)

Review:

"You'll laugh out loud many times during Daniel Smith's Monkey Mind....In the time-honored tradition of leavening pathos with humor, Smith has managed to create a memoir that doesn't entirely let him off the hook for bad behavior...but promotes understanding of the similarly afflicted." O magazine

Review:

"For fellow anxiety-sufferers, it's like finding an Anne of Green Gables-style kindred spirit." New York magazine's Vulture.com

Review:

"The book is one man's story, but at its core it's about all of us." Booklist

Synopsis:

In the insightful narrative tradition of Oliver Sacks, Monkey Mind is an uplifting, smart, and very funny memoir of life with anxiety — America's most common psychological complaint.

We all think we know what being anxious feels like: It is the instinct that made us run from wolves in the prehistoric age and pushes us to perform in the modern one. But for 40 million American adults, anxiety is an insidious condition that defines daily life. Yet no popular memoir has been written about that experience until now. Aaron Beck, the most influential doctor in modern psychotherapy, says that "Monkey Mind does for anxiety what William Styron's Darkness Visible did for depression."

In Monkey Mind, Daniel Smith brilliantly articulates what it is like to live with anxiety, defanging the disease with humor, traveling through its demonic layers, evocatively expressing both its painful internal coherence and its absurdities. He also draws on its most storied sufferers to trace anxiety's intellectual history and its influence on our time. Here, finally, comes relief and recognition to millions of people who want someone to put what they feel, or what their loved ones feel, into words.

Synopsis:

Anxiety once paralyzed Daniel Smith over a roast beef sandwich, convincing him that a choice between ketchup and barbeque sauce was as dire as that between life and death. It has caused him to chew his cuticles until they bled, wear sweat pads in his armpits, and confess his sexual problems to his psychotherapist mother. It has dogged his days, threatened his sanity, and ruined his relationships.

In Monkey Mind, Smith articulates what it is like to live with anxiety, defanging the disease with humor, traveling through its demonic layers, and evocatively expressing its self-destructive absurdities and painful internal coherence. With honesty and wit, he exposes anxiety as a pudgy, weak-willed wizard behind a curtain of dread and tames what has always seemed to him, and to the tens of millions of others who suffer from anxiety, a terrible affliction.

Here, finally, comes relief and recognition to all those who want someone to put what they feel, or what their loved ones feel, into words.

About the Author

Daniel B. Smith is the author of Muses, Madmen, and Prophets: Hearing Voices and the Borders of Sanity and the associate editor of The American Idea: The Best of The Atlantic Monthly. A former staff editor at the Atlantic, he is a contributor to numerous publications, including the American Scholar, the Atlantic, Granta, n+1, New York, the New York Times magazine, and Slate. He has appeared as a guest on The Brian Lehrer Show, On Point With Tom Ashbrook, and The Colbert Report, among other radio and television outlets.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 5 comments:

writermala, September 12, 2013 (view all comments by writermala)
Monkey Mind,subtitled "A memoir of anxiety," is just that it talks in depth about anxiety and is suitable for all readers. For readers like me who have at times been victims of anxiety here is a book which we can relate to and take comfort from. For those who do not suffer at all from anxiety - come on is there really someone like that - it is a peep into the lives, trials and tribulations of the rest of the world. This is an account in lay-persons terms and strikes at the core of the problem and how the author deals with it. A serious subject which has been told in a self-deprecating way which makes the account very readable.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Carolyn Jolly, November 18, 2012 (view all comments by Carolyn Jolly)
A shockingly honest and sometimes humorous account of one man’s anxiety. Smith meets his anxiety head-on as he considers the causes, continuation, and the farce that ensues. At once poignant and light-hearted, Smith’s memoir will make the reader cringe with embarrassment and laugh-out-loud at the absurdity of anxiety’s hold on the mind and body.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
Edward, September 11, 2012 (view all comments by Edward)
You can listen to a interview with the author podcast of this book in this week's New York Times Book Review.
The book itself is reassuring, that I am not alone. I frequently suffer from anxiety and sometimes support for this comes from the help of a good listener, a loving family member or friend, or in this case a good book. Oliver Sacks endorses this book. A much needed read in an age of anxiety. Being an introvert, I also frequently do not want to be around people, but would rather be with myself, alone and quiet. Oh, by the way, another good read about introversion and anxiety is Quiet; it just may be the ideal companion guide for this book. Thank you Mr.Smith, you have made a connection and you have made me smile. All I can hope one gains from reading taking my advise and reading it too, is that it will make them smile too.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 5 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781439177303
Author:
Smith, Daniel
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Author:
Smith, Daniel B.
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Medical - General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20120731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in

Other books you might like

  1. Why We Get Fat: And What to Do about...
    New Trade Paper $15.00
  2. Blind Eye: The Terrifying True Story... Used Trade Paper $5.95

Related Subjects


Biography » General
Biography » Medical
Featured Titles » Biography
Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » Staff Favorites
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Dictionaries and Encyclopedia
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Mind and Consciousness
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Psychopathology » Anxieties and Phobias
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Anxiety and Phobias
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » General
Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781439177303 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Anxiety is no laughing matter, yet afflicted journalist and editor Smith uses humor (such as his use of maxi pads to stem his profuse armpit sweat) as he explains the excess of thought and emotion also known as 'Monkey Mind' in Buddhism. He traces its roots to his psychotherapist mother, a woman whose life is riddled with attacks she actively works to overcome in her 40s. Smith's attacks are exacerbated by the loss of his virginity in a menage a  trois with two predatory older women whose advances he's too angst-ridden to rebuff. Smith also reflects on college, where the abundance of freedom and absence of personal space induces frequent tear-choked calls home. After graduation, he embarks on his first romance and lands a fact-checking job at the Atlantic. There, he writes his first article, which results in a libel lawsuit. When his two-year relationship falls apart, he steps out of his stress-addled head long enough to heed the advice of his therapist. Reading the harsh comments posted online about his article and tracking his thoughts and behavior for triggers helps him reroute his psychological circuitry and win his ex back. Smith does a skillful job of dissecting the mechanics of anxiety as well as placing the reader in his fitful shoes. Agent, Melanie Jackson. (July)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Monkey Mind does for anxiety what William Styron's Darkness Visible did for depression."
"Review" by , "I don't know Daniel Smith, but I do want to give him a hug. His book is so bracingly honest, so hilarious, so sharp, it's clear there's one thing he doesn't have to be anxious about: Whether or not he's a great writer."
"Review" by , "Daniel Smith has a written a wise, funny book, a great mix of startling memoir and fascinating medical and literary history, all of it delivered with humor and a true generosity of spirit. I only got anxious in the last part, when I worried the book would end."
"Review" by , "You don't need a Jewish mother, or a profound sweating problem, to feel Daniel Smith's pain in Monkey Mind. His memoir treats what must be the essential ailment of our time — chronic anxiety — and it does so with wisdom, honesty, and the kind of belly laughs that can only come from troubles transformed."
"Review" by , "Daniel Smith maps the jagged contours of anxiety with such insight, humor and compassion that the result is, oddly, calming. There are countless gems in these pages, including a fresh take on the psycho-pathology of chronic nail biting, an ill-fated menage a trois — and the funniest perspiration scene since Albert Brooks' sweaty performance in Broadcast News. Read this book. You have nothing to lose but your heart palpitations, and your Xanax habit."
"Review" by , "I read Monkey Mind with admiration for its bravery and clarity. Daniel Smith's anxiety is matched by a wonderful sense of the comic, and it is this which makes Monkey Mind not only a dark, pain-filled book but a hilariously funny one, too. I broke out into explosive laughter again and again."
"Review" by , "A true treasure-trove of insight laced with humor and polished prose."
"Review" by , "You'll laugh out loud many times during Daniel Smith's Monkey Mind....In the time-honored tradition of leavening pathos with humor, Smith has managed to create a memoir that doesn't entirely let him off the hook for bad behavior...but promotes understanding of the similarly afflicted."
"Review" by , "For fellow anxiety-sufferers, it's like finding an Anne of Green Gables-style kindred spirit."
"Review" by , "The book is one man's story, but at its core it's about all of us."
"Synopsis" by , In the insightful narrative tradition of Oliver Sacks, Monkey Mind is an uplifting, smart, and very funny memoir of life with anxiety — America's most common psychological complaint.

We all think we know what being anxious feels like: It is the instinct that made us run from wolves in the prehistoric age and pushes us to perform in the modern one. But for 40 million American adults, anxiety is an insidious condition that defines daily life. Yet no popular memoir has been written about that experience until now. Aaron Beck, the most influential doctor in modern psychotherapy, says that "Monkey Mind does for anxiety what William Styron's Darkness Visible did for depression."

In Monkey Mind, Daniel Smith brilliantly articulates what it is like to live with anxiety, defanging the disease with humor, traveling through its demonic layers, evocatively expressing both its painful internal coherence and its absurdities. He also draws on its most storied sufferers to trace anxiety's intellectual history and its influence on our time. Here, finally, comes relief and recognition to millions of people who want someone to put what they feel, or what their loved ones feel, into words.

"Synopsis" by , Anxiety once paralyzed Daniel Smith over a roast beef sandwich, convincing him that a choice between ketchup and barbeque sauce was as dire as that between life and death. It has caused him to chew his cuticles until they bled, wear sweat pads in his armpits, and confess his sexual problems to his psychotherapist mother. It has dogged his days, threatened his sanity, and ruined his relationships.

In Monkey Mind, Smith articulates what it is like to live with anxiety, defanging the disease with humor, traveling through its demonic layers, and evocatively expressing its self-destructive absurdities and painful internal coherence. With honesty and wit, he exposes anxiety as a pudgy, weak-willed wizard behind a curtain of dread and tames what has always seemed to him, and to the tens of millions of others who suffer from anxiety, a terrible affliction.

Here, finally, comes relief and recognition to all those who want someone to put what they feel, or what their loved ones feel, into words.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and eBooks — here at Powells.com.