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An Aquarium: Poems

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ISBN13: 9781555975135
ISBN10: 1555975135
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From “Abalone” to “Zooxanthellae,” Jeffrey Yangs debut poetry collection is full of the exhilarating colors and ominous forms of aquatic life. But deeper under the surface are his observations on war, environmental degradation, language, and history, as a fathertroubled by violence and human mismanagement of the worldoffers advice to a newborn son.
Jeffrey Yang is a poet, translator, and editor at New Directions Publishing Corp. He is the translator of East Slope by Su Shi, and his poetry has appeared in The Nation, Tin House, and elsewhere. He lives in Beacon, New York.
From "Abalone" to "Zooxanthellae," Jeffrey Yang's debut poetry collection is full of the exhilarating colors and ominous forms of aquatic life. But deeper under the surface are his observations on war, environmental degradation, language, and history, as a fathertroubled by violence and human mismanagement of the worldoffers advice to a newborn son.
"Here is a first book written from a very high floor of the Tower of Babel, and the view is exhilarating. Not since D. H. Lawrence's Birds, Beasts and Flowers! or the bestiary written by Kenneth Rexroth for his daughters has a poet wrung so much human meaning from the natural world. But whereas Lawrence is discursively tender, and Rexroth wry and epigrammatically clever, Jeffrey Yang speaks in tongues as if touched with a Pentecostal flame. He leads the reader through a net of allusions in poems barnacled with hard words. A typical Yang poem begins with the title 'Oarfish'; traces it to the abode of humans called Midgard in Norse myth; invokes the ourobouros, the serpent devouring its own tail in a symbol of infinity; quotes the 19th-century American artist Elihu Vedder, the Baroque religious scholar Sor Juana and Lawrence's poem 'Fish'; glances at the Homeric word 'oarismos' (roughly, 'pillow talk'); and ends with guanine, a chemical that codes genetic information and also a substance found in fish scales . . . Compounding his ingenuities, Yang has also arranged the poems in this book as an abecedary, proceeding from A ('Abalone') through to Z ('Zooxanthellae'). What might feel like a gimmick instead leaves the reader dazzled at Yang's polymathic knowledge: dazzled, but not threatened, since the advent of Google means that allusiveness in poetry is no longer the challenge it used to be. In any case, as one ancient master tell us, 'What people / know is inferior to what they do not know.' Yang writes with a keen ear for the sound of language; indeed, his poems' openings sometimes seem like verbal spasms, before they smooth into grammar: 'Abalone Rumsen aulón / Aristotle auriform Costanoans / cultivated, Brueghel painted, / awabi Osahi dove for / on September 12, 435 A.D.' Subject, verb, and object resolve only gradually out of such music. These poems are concerned with translation and with metaphor, both of which involve a 'carrying across' from the natural into the human world; from the past into the present; from one language or civilization into another. Often they use the mousetrap form of the epigram, sudden and pleasing: 'The barnacle has the longest penis / of any animal in proportion; / never be ashamed of evolution.' Modesty figures among the lessons to be learned from nature, too; and honesty; and patience. And the poetic vehicle for these lessons is capable of great delicacy. A poem describing a kind of tetra, the familiar aquarium fish, reads in its entirety: 'You can see straight thru / an X-ray fish to its heart. / We are just as transparent / so be true, gentle, honest, just . . .' Accordingly, politicians are at one end of the moral spectrum for Yang, and our genetic near-neighbors the dolphin and the manatee are at the other. For in addition to its other strengthsso considerable that they may distract the reader from its most important accomplishmentthis is a moral book, in the best sense of the word. 'Philosophy's shadow: poetry. Poetry's / shadow: philosophy,' Yang writes. And chief among nature's lessons, it seems, is that of symbiosis or 'mutualism,' exemplified by the type of algae that gives its name to the book's final poem. Zooxanthellae live in tropical seas, dependent upon coral but also benefiting it. In this poem, the lines of which change progressively into prose as if under the torque of outrage, the peacefulness of such a coexistence is juxtaposed with the cold-bloodedness of those American scientists and soldiers who first uprooted certain Pacific islanders, then destroyed nuclear tests and finally returned to their desolation to sample the extent of nuclear poisoning. 'Mutalism' thus becomes a foil for the absolute corruption of natural instinct, which is more characteristically human. In fact the lesson is more complicated than this: the algae described are dinoflagellates; their presence in high concentrations in the flesh of fish causes sickness in the humans who eat it. The partners in symbiosis are not neutral, as Yang notes in an earlier poem: Some causes / are invisible to the naked eye. / Strive for equilibrium / rather than neutrality.' This poet is obsessive, as was the 17th-century English writer and physician Sir Thomas Browne, who tried to reconcile science and religion, and who believed he read numbers and lessons in nature that were of significance to humans. Browne has the last word in this book, in a concluding epigraph that reads in part: 'Thus there is something in us that can be without us and will be after us.' he could have been describing an isotope of uraniumor just good poetry, which is what Jeffrey Yang has delivered in this book."Karl Kirchwey, The New York Times Book Review

"Yang's witty, glitzy, erudite, and musical icthyographic extravaganza is the best bestiary since Lawrence and the snazziest first book in years. A starfish is born!"Eliot Weinberger

 
"If you ever need to remember that we live in outer space and all that it implies, go look into an aquarium. Or read this fabulous book that wraps eco-history into alphabet and weapon development and marine movement and actually proves that they are cooperating in the construction of the monster planet that we inhabit. Thrilling, scientific, mystical, clear, hilarious, horriblean 'aquarium' in all its complexity: this very book."Fanny Howe

Review:

"Yang's debut is as full of surprises as it is full of fish. Most of its 60-odd short poems, arranged alphabetically, take their names from aquatic creatures: 'Orca,' 'Parrotfish,' 'Nudibranch.' Though he does incorporate oceanology and fish biology ('Scientists exploit/ the mormyrid's unique electrical/ properties to test water'), Yang also brings in Chinese classical poetry, Hindu myth, 'intelligent design/ and think tanks' and political quips ('The U.S. is a small fish/ with a false head'). He is no less attentive to modern history and contemporary, Internet-based events: one poem praises the Italian revolutionary hero Garibaldi; the next explains, 'Google is a sea of consciousness.' Another thread has to do with East and West — and the oceans between. Yang's pithy free verse insists on entanglements among the literary arts and the natural sciences, as among East Asian, South Asian, European and American literatures: 'Triggerfish' includes Hawaiian proverbs, Catholic philosophy, comparative mythography and that inveterate comparer, the poet Ezra Pound, always 'testing the overtones.' Those who read the collection quickly may find it witty but gimmicky; those who bring more attention will take more away from this rare first book that combines a simple theme (poems as sea life, the book as their tank) with clear, sharp thought at the level of sentence and line." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

From “Abalone” to “Zooxanthellae,” Jeffrey Yangs debut poetry collection is full of the exhilarating colors and ominous forms of aquatic life. But deeper under the surface are his observations on war, environmental degradation, language, and history, as a father—troubled by violence and human mismanagement of the world—offers advice to a newborn son.

About the Author

Jeffrey Yang is a poet, translator, and editor at New Directions Publishing Corp. He is the translator of East Slope by Su Shi, and his poetry has appeared in The Nation, Tin House, and elsewhere. He lives in Beacon, New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

cganelin, January 18, 2009 (view all comments by cganelin)
Mr. Yang's An Aquarium is brilliant. The play of language and allusion, sound and fury, knowledge and whimsy, carries the reader easily from poem to poem. Some require a bit of work to understand fully how Mr. Yang brings these sea creatures (real and "pseudo") above the surface of the water to show how the world fits together at the same time to reveal how we are one symbiotic biomass. He renews and even reinvents in this collection both the traditional abecedary and the bestiary, infusing them with contemporary culture and history just as Aristotle, Herodotus and Saint Isidore of Seville had done over the centuries.
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Margaux O'Nolan, January 10, 2009 (view all comments by Margaux O'Nolan)
Reading Jeffrey Yang's first book, it's not hard to undersatnd why most readers flee from contemporary poetry. Like so many of today's poets who have grown up entirely in academia's hothouse, Mr. Yang evades contending directly with strong emotions by taking refuge in esoterica, "leading the reader through a net of allusions in poems barnacled with hard words," as a NY Times reviewer euphemized it.

Great poetry is always elegy, not etymology, entomology, or ichthyology.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781555975135
Author:
Yang, Jeffrey
Publisher:
Graywolf Press
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20081031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
80
Dimensions:
9.04 x 6.06 x 0.245 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

An Aquarium: Poems New Trade Paper
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Product details 80 pages Graywolf Press - English 9781555975135 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Yang's debut is as full of surprises as it is full of fish. Most of its 60-odd short poems, arranged alphabetically, take their names from aquatic creatures: 'Orca,' 'Parrotfish,' 'Nudibranch.' Though he does incorporate oceanology and fish biology ('Scientists exploit/ the mormyrid's unique electrical/ properties to test water'), Yang also brings in Chinese classical poetry, Hindu myth, 'intelligent design/ and think tanks' and political quips ('The U.S. is a small fish/ with a false head'). He is no less attentive to modern history and contemporary, Internet-based events: one poem praises the Italian revolutionary hero Garibaldi; the next explains, 'Google is a sea of consciousness.' Another thread has to do with East and West — and the oceans between. Yang's pithy free verse insists on entanglements among the literary arts and the natural sciences, as among East Asian, South Asian, European and American literatures: 'Triggerfish' includes Hawaiian proverbs, Catholic philosophy, comparative mythography and that inveterate comparer, the poet Ezra Pound, always 'testing the overtones.' Those who read the collection quickly may find it witty but gimmicky; those who bring more attention will take more away from this rare first book that combines a simple theme (poems as sea life, the book as their tank) with clear, sharp thought at the level of sentence and line." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
From “Abalone” to “Zooxanthellae,” Jeffrey Yangs debut poetry collection is full of the exhilarating colors and ominous forms of aquatic life. But deeper under the surface are his observations on war, environmental degradation, language, and history, as a father—troubled by violence and human mismanagement of the world—offers advice to a newborn son.
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