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Cockeyed

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Cockeyed Cover

ISBN13: 9781586483296
ISBN10: 1586483293
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This irreverent, tragicomic, astoundingly articulate memoir about going blind — and growing up — illuminates both the author's reality and our own.

On his 18th birthday, Ryan Knighton was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa, a congenital, progressive disease marked by night-blindness, tunnel vision and, eventually, total blindness. In this penetrating, nervy memoir, which ricochets between meditation and black comedy, Knighton tells the story of his fifteen-year descent into blindness while incidentally revealing the world of the sighted in all its phenomenal peculiarity.

Knighton learns to drive while unseeing; has his first significant relationship — with a deaf woman; navigates the punk rock scene and men's washrooms; learns to use a cane; and tries to pass for seeing while teaching English to children in Korea. Stumbling literally and emotionally into darkness, into love, into couch-shopping at Ikea, into adulthood, and into truce if not acceptance of his identity as a blind man, his writerly self uses his disability to provide a window onto the human condition. His experience of blindness offers unexpected insights into sight and the other senses, culture, identity, language, our fears and fantasies.

Cockeyed is not a conventional confessional. Knighton is powerful and irreverent in words and thought and impatient with the preciousness we've come to expect from books on disability. Readers will find it hard to put down this wild ride around their everyday world with a wicked, smart, blind guide at the wheel.

Review:

"Knighton, who teaches at Capilano College in Vancouver, started going blind in his teens, and in this hilarious and unsentimental yet moving memoir, he tells what it was like to lose his eyesight. He was born in the early 1970s, grew up in British Columbia and by 1987 was showing signs of poor vision. He began losing his sight early enough that the time frames of his coming-of-age and his coming-of-blindness overlap. Milestones such as his first driving experiences and his first relationships with girls, which would have been ordinary for other teenagers, were anything but for him. As he moved into adulthood, he also moved further into sightlessness, yet he turns the story into something so bracing that it reads like a travelogue — you can't wait to know where he's going next, whether it's to attend college in Vancouver, teach English in South Korea or get married. Wit can be a weapon, but can also be a kind of walking stick; being so gifted clearly guided Knighton long before anything began to happen to his eyes. Luckily for his readers, he was also gifted with a different kind of care and clear-sightedness, never stumbling into the maudlin. His book is an invitation to take a journey that no reader should refuse, to see life through another lens. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Sometimes, as a reviewer, I wonder why I'm assigned certain books. I get women's novels, I suppose, because I'm a woman, and Hollywood books because I write from Los Angeles. Crazy-seeming volumes sometimes come my way: I can only surmise that I have a few screws loose myself. But this particular book filled me with a sense of familiar doom. Ryan Knighton learned on his 18th birthday that he had retinitis... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Cockeyed provides an unexpectedly wry view of a life that twisted into the extraordinary." Boston Globe

Review:

"Engaging and insightful, literally shedding light on a dark and misunderstood condition." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Knighton's talent shines on every page of this feisty, bittersweet memoir....[A] compelling, sturdy read." Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"Knighton sees the world in tiny circles. He writes his memoir in this way, too. The whole becomes a powerful read." Cleveland Plain Dealer

Review:

"Blindness isn't normally something to laugh about. But Ryan Knighton's memoir...is one of those rare exceptions where it's OK. The author encourages it." Dallas Morning News

Synopsis:

Oliver Sacks meets David Sedaris — this irreverent, tragicomic, politically incorrect, astoundingly articulate memoir about going blind and growing up illuminates not just the author's reality, but the reader's own.

Synopsis:

This irreverent, tragicomic, politically incorrect, astoundingly articulate memoir about going blind–and growing up—illuminates not just the author's reality, but the reader's.

About the Author

Ryan Knighton was born in Langley, BC, but lives in East Vancouver without regrets. His first full-length collection of poetry and photography, Swing in the Hollow, was published by Anvil Press in 2001. Knighton teaches literature in the Department of English at Capilano College. Oh, and he's blind.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Neo Englander, October 7, 2006 (view all comments by Neo Englander)
I quite enjoyed Ryan Knighton's cockeyed account of his evolution into a man of blindness. You will laugh with guilty pleasure and relief as he he recounts cringeworthy moments of painful slapstick--and you will want to weep as he shares moments of raw pain and vulnerability. He isn't pitiful or noble but he is very honest as he taps his way through his teens (drivers ed!), adulthood (relationships! summer camp!), Korea, and IKEA. I love the way he writes and his insights about being/going blind in a sighted world.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781586483296
Subtitle:
A Memoir of Blindness
Author:
Knighton, Ryan
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Subject:
Handicapped
Subject:
Specific Groups - Special Needs
Subject:
Patients
Subject:
Blind
Subject:
General Biography
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20060529
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 14.4 oz

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Languages » Deaf Studies » Being Blind and Deaf

Cockeyed Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages PublicAffairs - English 9781586483296 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Knighton, who teaches at Capilano College in Vancouver, started going blind in his teens, and in this hilarious and unsentimental yet moving memoir, he tells what it was like to lose his eyesight. He was born in the early 1970s, grew up in British Columbia and by 1987 was showing signs of poor vision. He began losing his sight early enough that the time frames of his coming-of-age and his coming-of-blindness overlap. Milestones such as his first driving experiences and his first relationships with girls, which would have been ordinary for other teenagers, were anything but for him. As he moved into adulthood, he also moved further into sightlessness, yet he turns the story into something so bracing that it reads like a travelogue — you can't wait to know where he's going next, whether it's to attend college in Vancouver, teach English in South Korea or get married. Wit can be a weapon, but can also be a kind of walking stick; being so gifted clearly guided Knighton long before anything began to happen to his eyes. Luckily for his readers, he was also gifted with a different kind of care and clear-sightedness, never stumbling into the maudlin. His book is an invitation to take a journey that no reader should refuse, to see life through another lens. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Cockeyed provides an unexpectedly wry view of a life that twisted into the extraordinary."
"Review" by , "Engaging and insightful, literally shedding light on a dark and misunderstood condition."
"Review" by , "Knighton's talent shines on every page of this feisty, bittersweet memoir....[A] compelling, sturdy read."
"Review" by , "Knighton sees the world in tiny circles. He writes his memoir in this way, too. The whole becomes a powerful read."
"Review" by , "Blindness isn't normally something to laugh about. But Ryan Knighton's memoir...is one of those rare exceptions where it's OK. The author encourages it."
"Synopsis" by , Oliver Sacks meets David Sedaris — this irreverent, tragicomic, politically incorrect, astoundingly articulate memoir about going blind and growing up illuminates not just the author's reality, but the reader's own.
"Synopsis" by ,
This irreverent, tragicomic, politically incorrect, astoundingly articulate memoir about going blind–and growing up—illuminates not just the author's reality, but the reader's.

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