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1 Burnside International Studies- Oil Politics

Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil

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Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil Cover

ISBN13: 9781781681169
ISBN10: 1781681163
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Does oil wealth lead to political poverty? It often looks that way, but Carbon Democracy tells a more complex story. In this magisterial study, Timothy Mitchell rethinks the history of energy, bringing into his grasp as he does so environmental politics, the struggle for democracy, and the place of the Middle East in the modern world. 

With the rise of coal power, the producers who oversaw its production acquired the ability to shut down energy systems, a threat they used to build the first mass democracies. Oil offered the West an alternative, and with it came a new form of politics. Oil created a denatured political life whose central object – the economy – appeared capable of infinite growth. What followed was a Western democracy dependent on an undemocratic Middle East. We now live with the consequences: an impoverished political practice, incapable of addressing the crises that threaten to end the age of carbon democracy – namely, the disappearance of cheap energy and the carbon-fueled collapse of the ecological order.

Synopsis:

How oil undermines democracy, and our ability to address the environmental crisis

Synopsis:

In the global north the commoditization of creativity and knowledge under the banner of a creative economy is being posed as the post-industrial answer to dependency on labour and natural resources. Not only does it promise a more stable and sustainable future, but an economy focused on intellectual property is more environmentally friendly, so it is suggested.

Resource Sovereigns argues that the fixes being offered by this model, popularised by market economics since the end of World War II, are bluffs; that development in the global south continues to be hindered by a global division of labour and nature that puts the capacity for technological advancement in private hands. The authors call for a multilayered understanding of sovereignty (an ostensibly outdated political concept in the world of global capital) arguing that it holds the key to undermining rigid accounts of the relationship between carbon and democracy, energy and development, and energy and political expression. Furthermore, a critical focus on energy politics is crucial to wider debates on development and sustainability.

Essential reading for those wondering how energy resources are converted into political power and why we still value the energy we take from our surroundings more than the means of its extraction.

Synopsis:

Contested Powers looks specifically at the role of fossil fuels and renewable energy in the economic development of countries in Latin America. The contributors to this volume argue that the two currently dominant approaches to energy policyandmdash;either a focus on energy conservation or a focus on creating renewable energy resourcesandmdash;are actually two sides of the same coin. Both approaches are hindered by an underlying division of labor and capital that puts the means for ecologically sound technological advancement in the hands of a minority. The essays in Contested Powers go beyond Latin America to demonstrate that the key to addressing climate change and sustainable development around the globe is to first address the relationship between political and financial power and energy use and resources.

Synopsis:

Carbon Democracy provides a unique examination of the relationship between oil and democracy. Interweaving the history of energy, political analysis, and economic theory, Mitchell targets conventional wisdom regarding energy and governance. Emphasizing how oil and democracy have intermixed, he argues that while coal provided the impetus for mass democracy, the shift to oil drastically limited democratic possibility; above all, the ability to confront contemporary ecological crises.

About the Author

Timothy Mitchell teaches at Columbia University. His books include Colonising Egypt, Rule of Experts, and Carbon Democracy.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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vautrin, October 22, 2014 (view all comments by vautrin)
The is one of the best books about politics in the Middle East I have ever read. Mitchell's exploration of the relationship between fossil fuels and political/economic structures is endlessly fascinating and pulls together so many aspects of Middle Eastern politics and US foreign relations in a coherent yet endlessly complex synthesis that will blow your mind.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781781681169
Author:
Mitchell, Timothy
Publisher:
Verso
Author:
Borchgrevnik, Axel
Author:
Logan , Owen
Author:
McNeish, John-Andrew
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20130631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 halftones
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Business » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Political Science
History and Social Science » Politics » Politics of Oil
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » US History » Social and Economic History
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Energy
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General

Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$13.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Verso - English 9781781681169 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How oil undermines democracy, and our ability to address the environmental crisis
"Synopsis" by ,

In the global north the commoditization of creativity and knowledge under the banner of a creative economy is being posed as the post-industrial answer to dependency on labour and natural resources. Not only does it promise a more stable and sustainable future, but an economy focused on intellectual property is more environmentally friendly, so it is suggested.

Resource Sovereigns argues that the fixes being offered by this model, popularised by market economics since the end of World War II, are bluffs; that development in the global south continues to be hindered by a global division of labour and nature that puts the capacity for technological advancement in private hands. The authors call for a multilayered understanding of sovereignty (an ostensibly outdated political concept in the world of global capital) arguing that it holds the key to undermining rigid accounts of the relationship between carbon and democracy, energy and development, and energy and political expression. Furthermore, a critical focus on energy politics is crucial to wider debates on development and sustainability.

Essential reading for those wondering how energy resources are converted into political power and why we still value the energy we take from our surroundings more than the means of its extraction.

"Synopsis" by ,
Contested Powers looks specifically at the role of fossil fuels and renewable energy in the economic development of countries in Latin America. The contributors to this volume argue that the two currently dominant approaches to energy policyandmdash;either a focus on energy conservation or a focus on creating renewable energy resourcesandmdash;are actually two sides of the same coin. Both approaches are hindered by an underlying division of labor and capital that puts the means for ecologically sound technological advancement in the hands of a minority. The essays in Contested Powers go beyond Latin America to demonstrate that the key to addressing climate change and sustainable development around the globe is to first address the relationship between political and financial power and energy use and resources.
"Synopsis" by , Carbon Democracy provides a unique examination of the relationship between oil and democracy. Interweaving the history of energy, political analysis, and economic theory, Mitchell targets conventional wisdom regarding energy and governance. Emphasizing how oil and democracy have intermixed, he argues that while coal provided the impetus for mass democracy, the shift to oil drastically limited democratic possibility; above all, the ability to confront contemporary ecological crises.
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