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1 Beaverton Gender Studies- Sex Industry

Chicken: Self-Portrait of a Young Man for Rent

by

Chicken: Self-Portrait of a Young Man for Rent Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Here is a story like no other: The unforgettable chronicle of a season spent walking the razor-sharp line between painful innocence and the allure of the abyss. David Sterry was a wide-eyed son of 1970s suburbia, but within his first week looking for off-campus housing on Sunset Boulevard he was lured into a much darker world — servicing the lonely women of Hollywood by night.

Chicken — the word is slang for a young male prostitute — revisits this year of living dangerously, in a narrative of dazzling inventiveness and searing candor. Shifting back and forth from tales of Sterry's youth — spent in the awkward bosom of a disintegrating dysfunctional family — to his fascinating account of the Neverland of post-sixties sexual excess, Chicken teems with Felliniesque characters and set pieces worthy of Dionysus. And when the life finally overwhelms Sterry, his retreat from the profession will leave an indelible mark on readers' minds and hearts.

Review:

"Mr. Sterry writes with comic brio... he's honed a vibrant outrageous writing style and turned out this studiously wild souvenir of a checkered past." Janet Maslin, New York Times

Review:

"Alternately sexy and terrifying, hysterical and weird, David Henry Sterry's Chicken is a hot walk on the wild side of Hollywood's fleshy underbelly. With lush prose and a flawless ear for the rhythms of the street, Sterry lays out a life lived on the edge in a coming-of-age classic that's colorful, riveting, and strangely beautiful. David Henry Sterry is the real thing." Jerry Stahl

Review:

"The book's climactic, Midnight Cowboy-esque scene, in which Sterry gets violent with one of his few male clients and finally quits the life, may feel good for the wrong reasons. Sterry's book is an easy but not an insightful read." Publishers Weekly

Synopsis:

David Sterry was a wide-eyed son of 1970's suburbia, but he was lured into a dark world--servicing the lonely women of Hollywood by night. "Chicken"--the word is slang for a young male prostitute--revisits this year of living dangerously in a narrative of dazzling inventiveness and searing candor.

Synopsis:

I walk all the way up Hollywood Boulevard to Grauman's Chinese Theatre: past turistas snapping shots; wannabe starlets sparkling by in miniskirts with head shots in their hands and moondust in their eyes; rowdy cowboys drinking with drunken Indians; black businessmen bustling by briskly in crisp suits; ladies who do not lunch with nylons rolled up below the knee pushing shopping carts full of everything they own; Mustangs rubbing up against muscular Mercedes and Hell's Angels hogs.

It's a sick twisted Wonderland, and I'm Alice.

Here is a story like no other: The unforgettable chronicle of a season spent walking the razor-sharp line between painful innocence and the allure of the abyss. David Sterry was a wide-eyed son of 1970s suburbia, but within his first week looking for off-campus housing on Sunset Boulevard he was lured into a much darker world — servicing the lonely women of Hollywood by night.

Chicken — the word is slang for a young male prostitute — revisits this year of living dangerously, in a narrative of dazzling inventiveness and searing candor. Shifting back and forth from tales of Sterry's youth — spent in the awkward bosom of a disintegrating dysfunctional family — to his fascinating account of the Neverland of post-sixties sexual excess, Chicken teems with Felliniesque characters and set pieces worthy of Dionysus. And when the life finally overwhelms Sterry, his retreat from the profession will leave an indelible mark on readers' minds and hearts.

Synopsis:

When David Sterry arrived in Hollywood in the early 1970s as a freshman at a local Catholic college, he was "seventeen-year-old freshmeat," at once a wide-eyed naif and a young man who'd seen his share of trauma at the hands of gently dysfunctional family.

But nothing prepared him for the next step he took — into the world of teenage prostitution. On his first night in Hollywood he is brutally raped by a street hustler who'd offered to help him; a few weeks later he is offered a job as a chicken — a prostitute to the lonely, rich, bored housewives of Hollywood. At first he's intrigued by the job: sexually precocious, conditioned by his mother to understand and want to please women, he's more than happy to make a few extra hundred bucks a week servicing them. But the longer he is exposed to the underbelly of 70s Hollywood — the drugs, the blank-eyed women, the decadent orgies — the more disoriented and disaffected he feels...until a series of events gradually persuades him to give up the life forever.

Chicken is a book like no other. Bleak and sexy, starkly honest and surprisingly funny, it alternates between flashbacks to Sterry's uncomfortable suburban childhood and his time as a chicken — nights spent as a hired stud in "nuthugging elephantbell" pants and Hendrix t-shirts, days spent masquerading as a perfectly normal freshman going to classes and falling in love. Through its unforgettably playful narrative voice, and the very strangeness of the story itself, Chicken conveys something fresh, and unexpectedly uplifting, about what it means to suffer through the American Dream and make it out alive.

About the Author

David Henry Sterry has worked as an actor, a marriage counselor, a screenwriter, a comedian, and an athlete. Also the author (with Arielle Eckstut) of Satchel Sez: The Wit, Wisdom, and World of Leroy "Satchel" Paige, he lives in San Rafael, California.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060394189
Subtitle:
Self-Portrait of a Young Man for Rent
Author:
Sterry, David Henry
Publisher:
ReganBooks
Location:
New York
Subject:
Specific Groups
Subject:
Sexuality
Subject:
Teenage prostitution
Subject:
Male prostitution
Subject:
Male prostitutes
Subject:
Specific Groups - General
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
121
Publication Date:
c2002
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.53x5.76x.95 in. .86 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » Sex Industry
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Pornography
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Sex Industry

Chicken: Self-Portrait of a Young Man for Rent Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages ReganBooks - English 9780060394189 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Mr. Sterry writes with comic brio... he's honed a vibrant outrageous writing style and turned out this studiously wild souvenir of a checkered past."
"Review" by , "Alternately sexy and terrifying, hysterical and weird, David Henry Sterry's Chicken is a hot walk on the wild side of Hollywood's fleshy underbelly. With lush prose and a flawless ear for the rhythms of the street, Sterry lays out a life lived on the edge in a coming-of-age classic that's colorful, riveting, and strangely beautiful. David Henry Sterry is the real thing."
"Review" by , "The book's climactic, Midnight Cowboy-esque scene, in which Sterry gets violent with one of his few male clients and finally quits the life, may feel good for the wrong reasons. Sterry's book is an easy but not an insightful read."
"Synopsis" by , David Sterry was a wide-eyed son of 1970's suburbia, but he was lured into a dark world--servicing the lonely women of Hollywood by night. "Chicken"--the word is slang for a young male prostitute--revisits this year of living dangerously in a narrative of dazzling inventiveness and searing candor.
"Synopsis" by ,

I walk all the way up Hollywood Boulevard to Grauman's Chinese Theatre: past turistas snapping shots; wannabe starlets sparkling by in miniskirts with head shots in their hands and moondust in their eyes; rowdy cowboys drinking with drunken Indians; black businessmen bustling by briskly in crisp suits; ladies who do not lunch with nylons rolled up below the knee pushing shopping carts full of everything they own; Mustangs rubbing up against muscular Mercedes and Hell's Angels hogs.

It's a sick twisted Wonderland, and I'm Alice.

Here is a story like no other: The unforgettable chronicle of a season spent walking the razor-sharp line between painful innocence and the allure of the abyss. David Sterry was a wide-eyed son of 1970s suburbia, but within his first week looking for off-campus housing on Sunset Boulevard he was lured into a much darker world — servicing the lonely women of Hollywood by night.

Chicken — the word is slang for a young male prostitute — revisits this year of living dangerously, in a narrative of dazzling inventiveness and searing candor. Shifting back and forth from tales of Sterry's youth — spent in the awkward bosom of a disintegrating dysfunctional family — to his fascinating account of the Neverland of post-sixties sexual excess, Chicken teems with Felliniesque characters and set pieces worthy of Dionysus. And when the life finally overwhelms Sterry, his retreat from the profession will leave an indelible mark on readers' minds and hearts.

"Synopsis" by , When David Sterry arrived in Hollywood in the early 1970s as a freshman at a local Catholic college, he was "seventeen-year-old freshmeat," at once a wide-eyed naif and a young man who'd seen his share of trauma at the hands of gently dysfunctional family.

But nothing prepared him for the next step he took — into the world of teenage prostitution. On his first night in Hollywood he is brutally raped by a street hustler who'd offered to help him; a few weeks later he is offered a job as a chicken — a prostitute to the lonely, rich, bored housewives of Hollywood. At first he's intrigued by the job: sexually precocious, conditioned by his mother to understand and want to please women, he's more than happy to make a few extra hundred bucks a week servicing them. But the longer he is exposed to the underbelly of 70s Hollywood — the drugs, the blank-eyed women, the decadent orgies — the more disoriented and disaffected he feels...until a series of events gradually persuades him to give up the life forever.

Chicken is a book like no other. Bleak and sexy, starkly honest and surprisingly funny, it alternates between flashbacks to Sterry's uncomfortable suburban childhood and his time as a chicken — nights spent as a hired stud in "nuthugging elephantbell" pants and Hendrix t-shirts, days spent masquerading as a perfectly normal freshman going to classes and falling in love. Through its unforgettably playful narrative voice, and the very strangeness of the story itself, Chicken conveys something fresh, and unexpectedly uplifting, about what it means to suffer through the American Dream and make it out alive.

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