Nonficionado Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Q&A | May 11, 2015

    Heidi Pitlor: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Heidi Pitlor



    Describe your latest book. My novel, The Daylight Marriage, is about a wife and mother who goes missing one day. The narrative alternates between... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse US History- 1800 to Civil War

More copies of this ISBN

Waking Giant: America in the Age of Jackson

by

Waking Giant: America in the Age of Jackson Cover

ISBN13: 9780060826567
ISBN10: 0060826568
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $9.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

America experienced unprecedented expansion and turmoil in the years between 1815 and 1848. In Waking Giant, Bancroft Prize-winning historian and literary critic David S. Reynolds illuminates the period's exciting political story as well as the fascinating social and cultural movements that influenced it. He casts fresh light on Andrew Jackson, who redefined the presidency, along with John Quincy Adams and James K. Polk, who expanded the nation's territory and strengthened its position internationally.

Waking Giant captures the turbulence of a democracy caught in the throes of the controversy over slavery, the rise of capitalism, and the birth of urbanization. Reynolds reveals unknown dimensions of the Second Great Awakening with its sects, cults, and self-styled prophets. He brings to life the reformers, abolitionists, and temperance advocates who struggled to correct America's worst social ills. He uncovers the political roots of some of America's greatest authors and artists, from Ralph Waldo Emerson and Edgar Allan Poe to Thomas Cole and Asher B. Durand, and he reveals the shocking phenomena that marked the age: bloody duels and violent mobs, P. T. Barnum's freaks and all-seeing mesmerists, polygamous prophets and wealthy prostitutes, table-lifting spiritualists and rabble-rousing feminists. All were crucial to the political and social ferment that led to the Civil War.

Meticulously researched and masterfully written, Waking Giant is a brilliant chronicle of America's vibrant and tumultuous rise.

Review:

"Bancroft Prize — winning historian Reynolds (Walt Whitman's America) offers a fine addition to the literature on pre — Civil War American history in this account of the years 1815 — 1848. Exhilarated after defying Britain in the War of 1812, Americans redirected their energy into moving west, making money and wiping out every trace of elitism in their leaders. This resulted, after four aristocratic Virginians and two scholarly Adamses as president, in the election in 1828 of the uneducated frontiersman Andrew Jackson, who launched the unique American tradition of leaders who boast that they are no smarter than the electorate. While the politics of the era are familiar to many, even knowledgeable readers will relish the chapters on social history, in which Reynolds explains how a rapidly growing economy spurred both 'prudishness and prostitution,' and the enormous consumption of alcohol that spawned the temperance movement. Most, according to Reynolds, took for granted that anyone not like them (blacks, Indians, perhaps even Canadians) belonged to subhuman races. Although less opinionated than Sean Wilentz and Daniel Walker Howe on this period, Reynolds delivers a straightforward, insightful history of America during its bumptious adolescence. 44 b&w illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

It was the summer of 1832, and President Andrew Jackson was fleeing the notorious Foggy Bottom humidity for his home in Nashville, Tenn. Somehow he misplaced an important cache of papers along Washington's Post Road; they either dropped from his saddlebag, were stolen by the livery hand or were left behind in a tavern. Writing to his private secretary, Jackson lamented that the missing papers were... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Book News Annotation:

Reynolds, who has written several books on aspects of nineteenth-century American history, tackles the society as a whole in the period between the end of the War of 1812 and the Mexican-American War in 1848. While the figure of Andrew Jackson is used as a symbol of the age and the rapid changes in the American character, politics are only a part of the story. Reynolds examines the totality of American life: religion, immigration, entertainments, industry, literature, education and inventions. In the best tradition of social history, he demonstrates how nothing happens in a vacuum. Thoreau was appalled by the concept of Manifest Destiny and he also helped create the legend of John Brown as martyr. The battles Jackson had with the National Bank reflected the distrust of the frontiersman for the Establishment. By treating lesser known characters and events along with the major events of the period, Reynolds demonstrates how the nation found its unique voice, that of a somewhat discordant chorus, all singing at the top of their lungs. And beneath the reforms, exploration and creativity, Reynolds uncovers for the reader the roots of the coming War Between the States. This is a compelling book accessible to general readers. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Waking Giant is a brilliant, definitive history of Americas vibrant and tumultuous rise during the Jacksonian era from David S. Reynolds, the Bancroft Prize-winning author of Walt Whitmans America. Casting fresh light on Andrew Jackson, who redefined the presidency, along with John Quincy Adams and James K. Polk, who expanded the nations territory and strengthened its position internationally, Reynolds captures the turbulence of a democracy caught in the throes of the controversy over slavery, the rise of capitalism, and the birth of urbanization.

About the Author

David S. Reynolds is Distinguished Professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His books include John Brown, Abolitionist, winner of the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award; Walt Whitman's America, winner of the Bancroft Prize and the Ambassador Book Award and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and Beneath the American Renaissance, winner of the Christian Gauss Award from the Phi Beta Kappa Society. He lives in Old Westbury, New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

OneMansView, January 11, 2009 (view all comments by OneMansView)
Nice overview emphasizing culture (3.75*s)

The author claims that “the years from 1815 through 1848 were arguably the richest in American life,” in terms of “society, politics, and culture.” Perhaps, but that notion is not especially defended, as the book is a sweeping overview of the era covering both politics and culture. It makes sense to choose those endpoints for an era. The War of 1812 finally extricated the US from the always looming presence of England and 1848 marks the culmination of the incessant drive to obtain all land to the west coast from CA to Oregon (now Washington).

Andrew Jackson was certainly the most significant and polarizing individual of the era, certainly among politicians. Though a man of means, it was his democratizing instincts, most notably his battles against the US Bank and his inclination towards states’ rights, and his willingness to assert presidential powers, including no reluctance to issue vetoes, his Indian removal policies, and his terse put-down of South Carolina’s Nullification Act, that generated vigorous opposition. The Whigs formed the other part of what is called the Second Party System starting in 1832. Somewhat aristocratic, they appealed to high-minded types who had a nationalistic agenda of tariffs, internal improvements, and a centralized banking system. They eschewed labels as a political party and abhorred what they considered to be the dictatorial nature of Jackson. Politics became far more a mass participation event in these times. It’s doubtful whether the sloganeering of the 1840 presidential campaign involving Harrison versus Van Buren with the “Tippecanoe and Tyler too” theme has ever been surpassed.

Completely intertwined with the politics and culture of the era was the huge increase in the numbers of religious sects. They all emphasized the personally empowering nature of a one-to-one relationship with God in comparison with the older Calvinistic concept of predestination. It was a righteous empowerment that played out in politics, but even more so in reform movements concerned with slavery, women’s rights, alcohol usage and abuse, licentiousness, etc. It was also an era of invention, most notably the telegraph, as well as pseudo-scientific fads, often in the deficient fields of medicine. The art and literature of the era celebrated the common man and the US landscape, as well as seeing the darker sides of American life: urbanization, slavery, Indian removal, and the like. The rise of the “penny” press made accessible to vastly more readers than ever before both lowbrow and highbrow culture.

Because the book attempts to describe so much over several decades, it can only hint at the significance of events, positions espoused, and the turbulence engendered by reformers. The tone of the book is in no way critical of US culture and politics of the time, yet there is certainly room for that. It is in fact the singular failure of the people of the US, through political processes and social affairs, that they could not resolve the issue of slavery and prevent the bloodiest and most devastating event in our history. Perhaps not dealing with our nation-wide problems is a characteristic that we have. Our current era has numerous, serious problems that cannot seem to be addressed. The book is a nice overview of the era, especially culture. However, it is hard to see how this era surpasses the next thirty to forty years as being rich, consequential, transformative, etc.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060826567
Subtitle:
America in the Age of Jackson
Author:
Reynolds, David
Author:
Reynolds, David S.
Author:
by David S. Reynolds
Publisher:
Harper
Subject:
History
Subject:
United states
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
United States - Antebellum Era
Subject:
United States History 1815-1861.
Subject:
United States Social conditions To 1865.
Subject:
General History
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
American History
Publication Date:
20080930
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
480
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1.45 in 22.16 oz

Other books you might like

  1. John Adams
    Used Book Club Hardcover $4.48
  2. Truman
    Used Book Club Hardcover $5.50
  3. Murder at Madingly Grange Used Trade Paper $9.95
  4. Dream Children Used Hardcover $6.50
  5. The Hunter (Parker Novels) Used Trade Paper $9.95
  6. Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day:...
    Used Hardcover $14.50

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to 1945
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to Civil War

Waking Giant: America in the Age of Jackson Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.50 In Stock
Product details 480 pages Harper - English 9780060826567 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Bancroft Prize — winning historian Reynolds (Walt Whitman's America) offers a fine addition to the literature on pre — Civil War American history in this account of the years 1815 — 1848. Exhilarated after defying Britain in the War of 1812, Americans redirected their energy into moving west, making money and wiping out every trace of elitism in their leaders. This resulted, after four aristocratic Virginians and two scholarly Adamses as president, in the election in 1828 of the uneducated frontiersman Andrew Jackson, who launched the unique American tradition of leaders who boast that they are no smarter than the electorate. While the politics of the era are familiar to many, even knowledgeable readers will relish the chapters on social history, in which Reynolds explains how a rapidly growing economy spurred both 'prudishness and prostitution,' and the enormous consumption of alcohol that spawned the temperance movement. Most, according to Reynolds, took for granted that anyone not like them (blacks, Indians, perhaps even Canadians) belonged to subhuman races. Although less opinionated than Sean Wilentz and Daniel Walker Howe on this period, Reynolds delivers a straightforward, insightful history of America during its bumptious adolescence. 44 b&w illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Waking Giant is a brilliant, definitive history of Americas vibrant and tumultuous rise during the Jacksonian era from David S. Reynolds, the Bancroft Prize-winning author of Walt Whitmans America. Casting fresh light on Andrew Jackson, who redefined the presidency, along with John Quincy Adams and James K. Polk, who expanded the nations territory and strengthened its position internationally, Reynolds captures the turbulence of a democracy caught in the throes of the controversy over slavery, the rise of capitalism, and the birth of urbanization.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.