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This title in other editions

Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch Trials

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Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch Trials Cover

ISBN13: 9780061853289
ISBN10: 0061853283
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

What started out as girls' games became a witch hunt. Wicked Girls is a fictionalized account of the Salem witch trials told from the perspectives of three of the real young women living in Salem in 1692.

Ann Putnam Jr. plays the queen bee. When her father suggests that a spate of illnesses within the village is the result of witchcraft, Ann grasps her opportunity. She puts in motion a chain of events that will change the lives of the people around her forever.

Mercy Lewis, the beautiful servant in Ann's house, inspires adulation in some and envy in others. With a troubled past, she seizes her only chance at safety.

Margaret Walcott, Ann's cousin, is desperately in love and consumed with fiery jealousy. She is torn between staying loyal to her friends and pursuing the life she dreams of with her betrothed.

With new accusations mounting daily against the men and women of the community, the girls will have to decide: Is it too late to tell the truth?

A Printz Honor winner for Your Own, sylvia, Stephanie Hemphill uses evocative verse to weave a nuanced portrait of one of the most chilling and fascinating times in our nation's history.

Review:

"Hemphill (Your Own, Sylvia) plumbs the psychological underpinnings of the Salem witch trials in blank verse monologues from three of the main accusers. Two girls, eight and 12, fall violently ill, having seizures and singling out neighbors as witches. Seeing the weight the girls' accusations are given ('All that Betty and Abigail say in fit/ is listened to like it comes from the town council'), Ann, Mercy, and Margaret snatch the opportunity to join in and move to positions of influence as well, targeting those who have harmed them or their families. Neighbors are jailed and even executed based on the girls' testimony, and even as wiser heads question their credibility, the girls turn on each other, fueled by jealousy, peer pressure, blackmail, and the desire to dominate the group. Even those familiar with the historical events will savor the exploration of the underlying motivations, as Hemphill breathes life into those long dead and holds a mirror up to contemporary society. The expressive writing, masterful tension, and parallels to modern group dynamics create a powerful and relevant page-turner. Ages 12 — up. (July)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

Newbery Honor-winner Margarita Engle tells the story of Cuban folk hero, abolitionist, and women's rights pioneer Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda in this powerful new YA historical novel in verse.

Synopsis:

“I find it so easy to forget / that Im just a girl who is expected / to live / without thoughts.” Opposing slavery in Cuba in the nineteenth century was dangerous. The most daring abolitionists were poets who veiled their work in metaphor. Of these, the boldest was Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, nicknamed Tula. In passionate, accessible verses of her own, Engle evokes the voice of this book-loving feminist and abolitionist who bravely resisted an arranged marriage at the age of fourteen, and was ultimately courageous enough to fight against injustice. Historical notes, excerpts, and source notes round out this exceptional tribute.

About the Author

Stephanie Hemphill is also the award-winning author of Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch Trials, a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist; Your Own, Sylvia: A Verse Portrait of Sylvia Plath, a Michael L. Printz Honor Book; Sisters of Glass; and Things Left Unsaid: A Novel in Poems. She lives in Chicago, Illinois.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Klickitat, January 28, 2011 (view all comments by Klickitat)
Although there are many theories, no one knows for certain why, in 1692, young Puritan girls accused their neighbors of practicing witchcraft during the infamous Salem Witch Trials. In Wicked Girls, Hemphill, winner of a Printz Honor for Your Own, Sylvia: A Verse Portrait of Sylvia Plath, proposes that the girls faked their fits to gain attention and enact revenge against those who had wronged them. The story is told in verse and the perspective alternates between three of the young female "seers": an upper class girl named Ann, Mercy, Ann's servant, and Margaret, Ann's cousin. Each brief, free verse poem is titled and the speaker is identified in italics beneath the title. The resulting narrative reads like Mean Girls set in Puritanical times. Although the setting is historical, teens will recognize the forces that compel the girls to bear witness against their fellow villagers. Hemphill intends to represent the entire year of witch hunt hysteria and, as a result, the book drags considerably in the middle when little changes apart from more squabbling between the girls. Unfortunately, although Hemphill is a talented poet, the verse format often distracts from the story being told. The girls' narrative voices are not dissimilar enough to register, forcing the reader to rely on the identifications at the beginning of each poem and halting the flow of the story. The cover doesn't have much shelf appeal but teens are likely to enjoy the book once they are encouraged to read it. Further biographies on the main characters and a bibliography of recommended sources is included after the novel's conclusion. Hemphill also provides an author's note explaining her research process, her intentions, and some of the liberties she took to serve the story she wanted to tell.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780061853289
Author:
Hemphill, Stephanie
Publisher:
Balzer & Bray/Harperteen
Author:
Engle, Margarita
Subject:
General
Subject:
Girls & Women
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Witchcraft
Subject:
Novels in verse
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Children s-Historical Fiction-U.S. Colonial and Revolutionary Periods
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20100631
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
8 x 5.5 in 0.67 lb
Age Level:
from 12

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction
Children's » Historical Fiction » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » Colonial and Revolutionary Periods
Young Adult » General

Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch Trials New Hardcover
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$17.99 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Balzer & Bray/Harperteen - English 9780061853289 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Hemphill (Your Own, Sylvia) plumbs the psychological underpinnings of the Salem witch trials in blank verse monologues from three of the main accusers. Two girls, eight and 12, fall violently ill, having seizures and singling out neighbors as witches. Seeing the weight the girls' accusations are given ('All that Betty and Abigail say in fit/ is listened to like it comes from the town council'), Ann, Mercy, and Margaret snatch the opportunity to join in and move to positions of influence as well, targeting those who have harmed them or their families. Neighbors are jailed and even executed based on the girls' testimony, and even as wiser heads question their credibility, the girls turn on each other, fueled by jealousy, peer pressure, blackmail, and the desire to dominate the group. Even those familiar with the historical events will savor the exploration of the underlying motivations, as Hemphill breathes life into those long dead and holds a mirror up to contemporary society. The expressive writing, masterful tension, and parallels to modern group dynamics create a powerful and relevant page-turner. Ages 12 — up. (July)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by ,

Newbery Honor-winner Margarita Engle tells the story of Cuban folk hero, abolitionist, and women's rights pioneer Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda in this powerful new YA historical novel in verse.

"Synopsis" by ,
“I find it so easy to forget / that Im just a girl who is expected / to live / without thoughts.” Opposing slavery in Cuba in the nineteenth century was dangerous. The most daring abolitionists were poets who veiled their work in metaphor. Of these, the boldest was Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, nicknamed Tula. In passionate, accessible verses of her own, Engle evokes the voice of this book-loving feminist and abolitionist who bravely resisted an arranged marriage at the age of fourteen, and was ultimately courageous enough to fight against injustice. Historical notes, excerpts, and source notes round out this exceptional tribute.
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