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Everything Here Is the Best Thing Ever: Stories (P.S.)

by

Everything Here Is the Best Thing Ever: Stories (P.S.) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Each story in this crystalline, spare, oddly moving collection cuts to the quick. Taylor's characters are guided by delusions and misapprehensions that quickly bring them to impasses with reality. Moving through this collection the reader will meet a young man who has reasoned away certain boundaries in relation to his budding, girl cousin; a high schooler whose desire to win back his crush leads him to experiment with goth magic; a man whose girlfriend is stolen by angels; and a Tetris player who, as the advancing white wall of the Apocalypse slowly churns up his driveway, decides that Death is a kindness.

Fearless and funny, Taylor imagines this and more, in a collection that paints a dark picture of his generation — one that is upwardly mobile yet adrift, fumbling for connection but hopelessly self-involved. And it's all held together by a thread of wounding humor and candid storytelling that marks Taylor as a distinct and emerging literary talent.

Review:

"Taylor flirts with poetic language, teasing us with lines so lusciously packed that even a tattoo's description can set the page on fire." Bookslut

Review:

"Justin Taylor does irony and snark and thwarted idealism uncommonly well." Huffington Post

Review:

"These short fictions by Justin Taylor give such a convincing account of the rough crossing of young adulthood that they practically induce seasickness. For his youthful protagonists, identity — emotional, intellectual, sexual — is unstable, constantly in motion." Boston Globe

Review:

"Justin Taylor is a master of the modern snapshot." Los Angeles Times

Synopsis:

For fans of Kevin Brockmeier or Justin Taylor, a poignant and inventive collection of coming-of-age stories by Tin House and Best New American Voices contributor Sean Ennis.

Synopsis:

In this beautifully imaginative collection, young people attempt to negotiate the often surreal terrain of childhood and adolescence where family, friends, clergy, and teachers often pose a threat instead of providing safe harbor. At the heart of the collection is the relationship between the meek narrator, his best friend alpha-male Clip, and the near-feral Rogerand#8212;but there are also agoraphobic mothers, gorgeous babysitters from New Zealand, paranoid stoned veterans, and deeply sad older sisters.

Ennis has crafted modern-day captivity narratives, set not at some remote fort, but in the neighborhoods of Philadelphia. Using cinematic imagery and deft characterization, Ennis explores how we often feel confined and yet find ourselves in places we least expect.

Synopsis:

A century after her birth, Tillie Olsens writing is as relevant as when it first appeared; indeed, the clarity and passion of her vision and style have, if anything, become even more striking over time. Collected here for the first time are several of Olsens nonfiction pieces about the 1930s, early journalism pieces, and short fiction, including the four beautifully crafted, highly celebrated stories originally published as Tell Me a Riddle: “I Stand Here Ironing,” “Hey Sailor, What Ship?,” “O Yes,” and “Tell Me a Riddle.” Also included, for the first time since it appeared in the 1971 Best American Short Stories, is “Requa I.”

In these stories, as in all of her work, Olsen set a new standard for the treatment of women and the poor and for the depiction of their lives and circumstances. In her hands, the hard truths about motherhood and marriage, domestic life, labor, and political conviction found expression in language of such poetic intensity and depth that its influence continues to be felt today.

An introduction by Olsens granddaughter, the poet Rebekah Edwards, and a foreword by her daughter Laurie Olsen provide a personal and generational context for the authors work.

About the Author

Justin Taylor's fiction and nonfiction have been widely published in journals, magazines, and Web sites, including The Believer, the Nation, the New York Tyrant, the Brooklyn Rail, Flaunt, and NPR. A coeditor of The Agriculture Reader and a contributor to HTMLGIANT, Taylor lives in Brooklyn and is at work on his first novel.

Table of Contents

1.and#160;Going After Lovelyand#8195;1

2.and#160;This Is Suicideand#8195;19

3.and#160;Saint Kevin of Fox Chaseand#8195;35

4.and#160;Darkflipsand#8195;4

5.and#160;This Is Pennypackand#8195;76

6.and#160;Chase Usand#8195;94

7.and#160;The Kidnapped and the Volunteersand#8195;107

8.and#160;This Is Amblerand#8195;123

9.and#160;This Is Recessionand#8195;152

10.and#160;Dependentsand#8195;169

11.and#160;This Is Tomorrowand#8195;180

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Acknowledgmentsand#8195;201

Product Details

ISBN:
9780061881817
Author:
Taylor, Justin
Publisher:
Harper Perennial
Author:
Edwards, Rebekah
Author:
Watkins, Yoko Kawashima
Author:
Ennis, Sean
Author:
Olsen, Tillie
Author:
Tayl
Author:
Olsen, Laurie
Author:
or, Justin
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Biographical - Other
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Stories (single author)
Subject:
Literary
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Series:
P.S.
Publication Date:
20100231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 5
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 b/w author photo
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in
Age Level:
from 10

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Everything Here Is the Best Thing Ever: Stories (P.S.) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$2.95 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Harper Perennial - English 9780061881817 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Taylor flirts with poetic language, teasing us with lines so lusciously packed that even a tattoo's description can set the page on fire."
"Review" by , "Justin Taylor does irony and snark and thwarted idealism uncommonly well."
"Review" by , "These short fictions by Justin Taylor give such a convincing account of the rough crossing of young adulthood that they practically induce seasickness. For his youthful protagonists, identity — emotional, intellectual, sexual — is unstable, constantly in motion."
"Review" by , "Justin Taylor is a master of the modern snapshot."
"Synopsis" by , For fans of Kevin Brockmeier or Justin Taylor, a poignant and inventive collection of coming-of-age stories by Tin House and Best New American Voices contributor Sean Ennis.
"Synopsis" by ,
In this beautifully imaginative collection, young people attempt to negotiate the often surreal terrain of childhood and adolescence where family, friends, clergy, and teachers often pose a threat instead of providing safe harbor. At the heart of the collection is the relationship between the meek narrator, his best friend alpha-male Clip, and the near-feral Rogerand#8212;but there are also agoraphobic mothers, gorgeous babysitters from New Zealand, paranoid stoned veterans, and deeply sad older sisters.

Ennis has crafted modern-day captivity narratives, set not at some remote fort, but in the neighborhoods of Philadelphia. Using cinematic imagery and deft characterization, Ennis explores how we often feel confined and yet find ourselves in places we least expect.

"Synopsis" by ,

A century after her birth, Tillie Olsens writing is as relevant as when it first appeared; indeed, the clarity and passion of her vision and style have, if anything, become even more striking over time. Collected here for the first time are several of Olsens nonfiction pieces about the 1930s, early journalism pieces, and short fiction, including the four beautifully crafted, highly celebrated stories originally published as Tell Me a Riddle: “I Stand Here Ironing,” “Hey Sailor, What Ship?,” “O Yes,” and “Tell Me a Riddle.” Also included, for the first time since it appeared in the 1971 Best American Short Stories, is “Requa I.”

In these stories, as in all of her work, Olsen set a new standard for the treatment of women and the poor and for the depiction of their lives and circumstances. In her hands, the hard truths about motherhood and marriage, domestic life, labor, and political conviction found expression in language of such poetic intensity and depth that its influence continues to be felt today.

An introduction by Olsens granddaughter, the poet Rebekah Edwards, and a foreword by her daughter Laurie Olsen provide a personal and generational context for the authors work.

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