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Hope Was Here

by

Hope Was Here Cover

ISBN13: 9780142404249
ISBN10: 0142404241
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Joan Bauer's beloved Newbery Honor book--now with a great new look for middle grade readers!

When Hope and her aunt move to small-town Wisconsin to take over the local diner, Hope's not sure what to expect. But what they find is that the owner, G.T., isn't quite ready to give up yet--in fact, he's decided to run for mayor against a corrupt candidate. And as Hope starts to make her place at the diner, she also finds herself caught up in G.T.'s campaign--particularly his visions for the future. After all, as G.T. points out, everyone can use a little hope to help get through the tough times . . . even Hope herself.

Filled with heart, charm, and good old-fashioned fun, this is Joan Bauer at her best.

Synopsis:

When sixteen-year-old Hope and the aunt who has raised her move from Brooklyn to Mulhoney, Wisconsin, to work as waitress and cook in the Welcome Stairways diner, they become involved with the diner owner's political campaign to oust the town's corrupt mayor.

Synopsis:

With frostbitten fingers, sleepless nights and sore muscles, 14-year-old Jackson Jones and his posse of cousins discover the lost art of winging it when they take over an orchard of 300 wild apple trees. After Jackson makes an unfair contract with his neighbor, Mrs. Nelson, the kids must learn about pruning, irrigation and pest control if they are to avoid losing $8,000.  

    With spot illustrations for mechanical-loving readersthe gears of a tractor, a plow with disksand with mathematical calculations of the great amount of money to be earned, this novel has the sort of can-do spirt and sense of earned independence not often found in today's fiction.    

About the Author

"Set in New Mexico in the early 1980s, Hawkins's children's book debut is rich with details that feel drawn from memory (an engineering professor who worked on his family's orchard as a child, Hawkins also contributes schematic line drawings), and Jackson's narration sparkles. His hard work, setbacks, and motivations make this a highly relatable adventure in entrepreneurship."--Publishers Weekly 

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Home School Book Review, July 5, 2013 (view all comments by Home School Book Review)
Sixteen-year-old Hope Yancey has lived a very nomadic life. Her mother Deena, a waitress who originally named her Tulip, didn’t want the responsibility of raising a baby, left her with her Aunt Addie, Deena’s older sister and a cook, and went off to live on her own. Hope remembers seeing her mom only three times. Addie and Hope have worked in Atlanta, GA, where Hope was a girl scout for three months; St. Louis, MO, where she changed her name from Tulip to Hope; the Rainbow Diner in Pensacola, SC, where Hope moved from bus girl to waitress; the Ballyhoo Grill in South Carolina; and the Blue Box in Brooklyn, NY, where Addie was a partner with owner Gleason Beal. In fact, Hope has lived in five different states and gone to six different schools. However, Gleason has run off with Addie’s money, along with the night waitress, for parts unknown, forcing the restaurant in Brooklyn to be closed down.

So now, Addie and Hope are headed to Mulhoney, WI, on the outskirts of Milwaukee, to work at the Welcome Stairways diner, owned by Gabriel Thomas (G. T.) Stoop, a 54-year-old man whose wife Gracie had died a few years before and who himself is being treated for leukemia. Addie and Hope have their hands full when G. T. decides to run for mayor against the unscrupulous incumbent Eli Millstone. A romantic interest develops between Hope and the eighteen-year-old Eddie Braverman who also cooks at the diner, as well as one between Addie and G. T. But will G. T. recover from his illness? Who will win the election? And what will happen to Addie and Hope? The possible objectionable elements in this book are not too many. Aside from a few common euphemisms (gee, kick butt), the terms Lord. God, and Jesus are frequently used as interjections, but there is no actual cursing. In one scene, Hope is accosted by the Carbinger brothers, but nothing really happens as she is rescued by Deputy Sheriff Babcock.

My major concern with the overall theme of the book is the picture of family. Hope has never met her father and doesn’t even know his name. In fact, her mother says that she doesn’t know who he is either. Addie’s no-good husband Malcolm left her for a thin-lipped dental hygienist. Braverman’s daddy walked out on the family. One of the other waitresses, Lou Ellen, has a baby Anastasia, who “doesn’t have a daddy either.” I know that these kinds of situations do occur, but reading modern children’s and youth literature, you might get the impression that they are the norm. Why do today’s writers feel that they must present nearly every family as dysfunctional? Thankfully, everything turns out nicely in the end, but there’s a lot of baggage to deal with along the way to get there. If one is willing to wade through all that, there is actually a good story in Hope Was Here, and I think that I can understand why it was a Newbery Honor Book in 2001 with its messages of needing “hope,” the importance of character, and having vision for the future, but it is definitely a story for teens and not for younger children.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780142404249
Author:
Bauer, Joan
Publisher:
Speak
Author:
Hawkins, Aaron
Subject:
Girls & Women
Subject:
Family - General
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - General
Subject:
Social Situations - General
Subject:
Cancer
Subject:
Social Situations - New Experience
Subject:
Politics, practical
Subject:
Children s All Ages - Fiction - General
Subject:
Social Issues - General
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Situations / Self-Esteem & Self-Reliance
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20050631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
5
Language:
English
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
7.63 x 5.13 in 1 lb
Age Level:
10

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Related Subjects

Children's » Awards » Newbery Award Winners
Children's » Featured Titles
Children's » Middle Readers » Newbery Award Winners
Children's » Sale Books
Children's » Situations » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Newbery Award Winners
Young Adult » General

Hope Was Here Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.95 In Stock
Product details 192 pages Puffin Books - English 9780142404249 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

When sixteen-year-old Hope and the aunt who has raised her move from Brooklyn to Mulhoney, Wisconsin, to work as waitress and cook in the Welcome Stairways diner, they become involved with the diner owner's political campaign to oust the town's corrupt mayor.

"Synopsis" by , With frostbitten fingers, sleepless nights and sore muscles, 14-year-old Jackson Jones and his posse of cousins discover the lost art of winging it when they take over an orchard of 300 wild apple trees. After Jackson makes an unfair contract with his neighbor, Mrs. Nelson, the kids must learn about pruning, irrigation and pest control if they are to avoid losing $8,000.  

    With spot illustrations for mechanical-loving readersthe gears of a tractor, a plow with disksand with mathematical calculations of the great amount of money to be earned, this novel has the sort of can-do spirt and sense of earned independence not often found in today's fiction.    

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