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Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



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    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

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What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry

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What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

While there have been several histories of the personal computer, well-known technology writer John Markoff has created the first ever to spotlight the unique political and cultural forces that gave rise to this revolutionary technology. Focusing on the period of 1962 through 1975 in the San Francisco Bay Area, where a heady mix of tech industries, radicalism, and readily available drugs flourished, What the Dormouse Said tells the story of the birth of the personal computer through the people, politics, and protest that defined its unique era. Based on interviews with all the major surviving players, Markoff vividly captures the lives and times of those who laid the groundwork for the PC revolution, introducing the reader to such colorful characters as Fred Moore, a teenage antiwar protester who went on to ignite the computer industry, and Cap'n Crunch, who wrote the first word processing software for the IBM PC (EZ Writer) in prison, became a millionaire, and ended up homeless. Both immensely informative and entertaining, What the Dormouse Said promises to appeal to all readers of technology, especially the bestselling The Soul of a New Machine.

Synopsis:

Most histories of the personal computer industry focus on technology or business. John Markoff’s landmark book is about the culture and consciousness behind the first PCs—the culture being counter– and the consciousness expanded, sometimes chemically. It’s a brilliant evocation of Stanford, California, in the 1960s and ’70s, where a group of visionaries set out to turn computers into a means for freeing minds and information. In these pages one encounters Ken Kesey and the phone hacker Cap’n Crunch, est and LSD, The Whole Earth Catalog and the Homebrew Computer Lab. What the Dormouse Said is a poignant, funny, and inspiring book by one of the smartest technology writers around.

Synopsis:

While there have been several written histories of the personal computer, a well-known technology writer has created the first ever to spotlight the unique political and cultural forces of the 1960s that gave rise to this revolutionary technology.

About the Author

John Markoff is a senior writer for The New York Times who has coauthored Cyberpunk: Outlaws and Hackers on the Computer Frontier and the bestselling Takedown: The Pursuit and Capture of Kevin Mitnick, America’s Most Wanted Computer Outlaw.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780143036760
Author:
Markoff, John
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
History
Subject:
Economic Conditions
Subject:
Microcomputers
Subject:
Industries - Computer Industry
Subject:
Corporate & Business History - General
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Nineteen sixties
Subject:
Computers and civilization
Subject:
Business Writing
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass Market
Publication Date:
20060231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16-page b/w insert
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.04x5.42x.74 in. .65 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Business » General
Business » History and Biographies
Business » Writing
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » History and Society
History and Social Science » Economics » General
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » Computers

What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry Used Trade Paper
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$8.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Penguin Books - English 9780143036760 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Most histories of the personal computer industry focus on technology or business. John Markoff’s landmark book is about the culture and consciousness behind the first PCs—the culture being counter– and the consciousness expanded, sometimes chemically. It’s a brilliant evocation of Stanford, California, in the 1960s and ’70s, where a group of visionaries set out to turn computers into a means for freeing minds and information. In these pages one encounters Ken Kesey and the phone hacker Cap’n Crunch, est and LSD, The Whole Earth Catalog and the Homebrew Computer Lab. What the Dormouse Said is a poignant, funny, and inspiring book by one of the smartest technology writers around.

"Synopsis" by , While there have been several written histories of the personal computer, a well-known technology writer has created the first ever to spotlight the unique political and cultural forces of the 1960s that gave rise to this revolutionary technology.

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