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1 Beaverton Ethnic Studies- General

This title in other editions

The Invisible Line: A Secret History of Race in America

by

The Invisible Line: A Secret History of Race in America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Invisible Line shines light on one of the most important, but too often hidden, aspects of American history and culture. Sharfstein's narrative of three families negotiating America's punishing racial terrain is a must read for all who are interested in the construction of race in the United States.

--Annette Gordon-Reed, Pulitzer Prize winning author of The Hemingses of Monticello

In America, race is a riddle. The stories we tell about our past have calcified into the fiction that we are neatly divided into black or white. It is only with the widespread availability of DNA testing and the boom in genealogical research that the frequency with which individuals and entire families crossed the color line has become clear.

In this sweeping history, Daniel J. Sharfstein unravels the stories of three families who represent the complexity of race in America and force us to rethink our basic assumptions about who we are. The Gibsons were wealthy landowners in the South Carolina backcountry who became white in the 1760s, ascending to the heights of the Southern elite and ultimately to the U.S. Senate. The Spencers were hardscrabble farmers in the hills of Eastern Kentucky, joining an isolated Appalachian community in the 1840s and for the better part of a century hovering on the line between white and black. The Walls were fixtures of the rising black middle class in post-Civil War Washington, D.C., only to give up everything they had fought for to become white at the dawn of the twentieth century. Together, their interwoven and intersecting stories uncover a forgotten America in which the rules of race were something to be believed but not necessarily obeyed.

Defining their identities first as people of color and later as whites, these families provide a lens for understanding how people thought about and experienced race and how these ideas and experiences evolved-how the very meaning of black and white changed-over time. Cutting through centuries of myth, amnesia, and poisonous racial politics, The Invisible Line will change the way we talk about race, racism, and civil rights.

Synopsis:

andquot;An astonishingly detailed rendering of the variety and complexity of racial experience in an evolving national culture.andquot;

-The New York Times Book Review

In the Obama era, as Americans confront the enduring significance of race and heritage, this multigenerational account of family secrets promises to spark debate across the country. Daniel J. Sharfstein's sweeping history moves from eighteenth-century South Carolina to twentieth-century Washington, D.C., unraveling the stories of three families who represent the complexity of race in America. Identifying first as people of color and later as whites, the families provide a lens through which to examine how people thought about and experienced race and how, for them and America, the very meanings of black and white changed. The Invisible Line cuts through centuries of myth to transform the way we see ourselves.

Synopsis:

"An astonishingly detailed rendering of the variety and complexity of racial experience in an evolving national culture."

-The New York Times Book Review

In the Obama era, as Americans confront the enduring significance of race and heritage, this multigenerational account of family secrets promises to spark debate across the country. Daniel J. Sharfstein's sweeping history moves from eighteenth-century South Carolina to twentieth-century Washington, D.C., unraveling the stories of three families who represent the complexity of race in America. Identifying first as people of color and later as whites, the families provide a lens through which to examine how people thought about and experienced race and how, for them and America, the very meanings of black and white changed. The Invisible Line cuts through centuries of myth to transform the way we see ourselves.

About the Author

Daniel J. Sharfstein is an associate professor of law at Vanderbilt University. He has written for The Yale Law Journal, The New York Times, The Economist, Slate, The Washington Post, and other publications. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780143120636
Author:
Sharfstein, Daniel J
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Author:
Sharfstein, Daniel J.
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - General
Edition Description:
Mass Market
Publication Date:
20120131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 pp. b/w photos (on insert stock?)
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
8.48 x 5.56 x 1 in 0.8 lb
Age Level:
from 18

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Racism and Ethnic Conflict
History and Social Science » US History » General

The Invisible Line: A Secret History of Race in America Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Penguin Books - English 9780143120636 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

andquot;An astonishingly detailed rendering of the variety and complexity of racial experience in an evolving national culture.andquot;

-The New York Times Book Review

In the Obama era, as Americans confront the enduring significance of race and heritage, this multigenerational account of family secrets promises to spark debate across the country. Daniel J. Sharfstein's sweeping history moves from eighteenth-century South Carolina to twentieth-century Washington, D.C., unraveling the stories of three families who represent the complexity of race in America. Identifying first as people of color and later as whites, the families provide a lens through which to examine how people thought about and experienced race and how, for them and America, the very meanings of black and white changed. The Invisible Line cuts through centuries of myth to transform the way we see ourselves.

"Synopsis" by ,

"An astonishingly detailed rendering of the variety and complexity of racial experience in an evolving national culture."

-The New York Times Book Review

In the Obama era, as Americans confront the enduring significance of race and heritage, this multigenerational account of family secrets promises to spark debate across the country. Daniel J. Sharfstein's sweeping history moves from eighteenth-century South Carolina to twentieth-century Washington, D.C., unraveling the stories of three families who represent the complexity of race in America. Identifying first as people of color and later as whites, the families provide a lens through which to examine how people thought about and experienced race and how, for them and America, the very meanings of black and white changed. The Invisible Line cuts through centuries of myth to transform the way we see ourselves.

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