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1 Beaverton Sociology- American Studies

Wartime Shipyard: A Study in Social Disunity

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Wartime Shipyard: A Study in Social Disunity Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An eye-opening first-hand account of life in a WWII shipyard from a woman's perspective

In 1942, Katherine Archibald, a graduate student at Berkeley, left the halls of academe to spend two years working in a nearby Oakland shipyard. She arrived with a host of preconceptions about the American working class, race relations and the prospect for their improvement, and wartime unity. Her experience working in a shipyard where women were seen as intruders, where Okies and black migrants from the South were regarded with barely-disguised hatred, and where trade unions preferred protecting their turf to defending workers' rights, threw much of her liberal faith into doubt.

Archibald's 1947 book about her experiences, Wartime Shipyard: A Study in Social Disunity, remains a classic account of life and labor on the home front. This new edition includes an introduction written by historians Eric Arnesen and Alex Lichtenstein, who explore Archibald's work in light of recent scholarship on women and African Americans in the wartime workplace.

Book News Annotation:

When Archibald left graduate school at Berkeley to work in the nearby Oakland shipyard as part of the war effort in 1942, she encountered a society very different from anything she had experienced before. Her sociological account originally published that year focuses on the various racial, gender, and other hierarchies within the workplace. Alex Lichtenstein (history, Rice U.) and Eric Arnesen (history and Africa-American studies, U. of Illinois-Chicago) contribute a substantial introduction putting the work in context.
Annotation 2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

When Archibald left graduate school at Berkeley to work in the nearby Oakland shipyard as part of the war effort in 1942, she encountered a society very different from anything she had experienced before. Her sociological account originally published that year focuses on the various racial, gender, and other hierarchies within the workplace. Alex Lichtenstein (history, Rice U.) and Eric Arnesen (history and Africa-American studies, U. of Illinois-Chicago) contribute a substantial introduction putting the work in context. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

An eye-opening first-hand account of life in a WWII shipyard from a woman's perspective 

In 1942, Katherine Archibald, a graduate student at Berkeley, left the halls of academe to spend two years working in a nearby Oakland shipyard. She arrived with a host of preconceptions about the American working class, race relations and the prospect for their improvement, and wartime unity. Her experience working in a shipyard where women were seen as intruders, where "Okies" and black migrants from the South were regarded with barely-disguised hatred, and where trade unions preferred protecting their turf to defending workers' rights, threw much of her liberal faith into doubt.  

Archibald's 1947 book about her experiences, Wartime Shipyard: A Study in Social Disunity, remains a classic account of life and labor on the home front. This new edition includes an introduction written by historians Eric Arnesen and Alex Lichtenstein, who explore Archibald's work in light of recent scholarship on women and African Americans in the wartime workplace. 

About the Author

Katherine Archibald taught at Stanford University, Pomona College, and the University of Manitoba.

Alex Lichtenstein is associate professor of history at Rice University, and the author of Twice the Work of Free Labor: The Political Economy of Convict Labor in the New South.

Eric Arnesen is professor of history and African-American studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is the author of Brotherhoods of Color: Black Railroad Workers and the Struggle for Equality.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780252073861
Author:
Archibald, Katherine
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
Introduction by:
Lichtenstein, Alex
Introduction by:
Arnesen, Eric
Introduction:
Arnesen, Eric
Introduction:
Lichtenstein, Alex
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Employees
Subject:
Shipyards.
Subject:
Careers - Job Almanacs
Subject:
Shipbuilding industry -- United States.
Subject:
Shipyards -- United States.
Subject:
Business-Careers
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Publication Date:
20060931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
4 photographs
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in

Related Subjects

Business » Careers
History and Social Science » American Studies » 20s to 40s
History and Social Science » Sociology » American Studies
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Wartime Shipyard: A Study in Social Disunity Used Trade Paper
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Product details 336 pages University of Illinois Press - English 9780252073861 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

An eye-opening first-hand account of life in a WWII shipyard from a woman's perspective 

In 1942, Katherine Archibald, a graduate student at Berkeley, left the halls of academe to spend two years working in a nearby Oakland shipyard. She arrived with a host of preconceptions about the American working class, race relations and the prospect for their improvement, and wartime unity. Her experience working in a shipyard where women were seen as intruders, where "Okies" and black migrants from the South were regarded with barely-disguised hatred, and where trade unions preferred protecting their turf to defending workers' rights, threw much of her liberal faith into doubt.  

Archibald's 1947 book about her experiences, Wartime Shipyard: A Study in Social Disunity, remains a classic account of life and labor on the home front. This new edition includes an introduction written by historians Eric Arnesen and Alex Lichtenstein, who explore Archibald's work in light of recent scholarship on women and African Americans in the wartime workplace. 

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