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Simulation and Its Discontents (Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life)

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Simulation and Its Discontents (Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Over the past twenty years, the technologies of simulation and visualization have changed our ways of looking at the world. In Simulation and Its Discontents, Sherry Turkle examines the now dominant medium of our working lives and finds that simulation has become its own sensibility. We hear it in Turkle's description of architecture students who no longer design with a pencil, of science and engineering students who admit that computer models seem more andquot;realandquot; than experiments in physical laboratories. Echoing architect Louis Kahn's famous question, andquot;What does a brick want?andquot;, Turkle asks, andquot;What does simulation want?andquot; Simulations want, even demand, immersion, and the benefits are clear. Architects create buildings unimaginable before virtual design; scientists determine the structure of molecules by manipulating them in virtual space; physicians practice anatomy on digitized humans. But immersed in simulation, we are vulnerable. There are losses as well as gains. Older scientists describe a younger generation as andquot;drunk with code.andquot; Young scientists, engineers, and designers, full citizens of the virtual, scramble to capture their mentors' tacit knowledge of buildings and bodies. From both sides of a generational divide, there is anxiety that in simulation, something important is slipping away. Turkle's examination of simulation over the past twenty years is followed by four in-depth investigations of contemporary simulation culture: space exploration, oceanography, architecture, and biology.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

How the simulation and visualization technologies so pervasive in science, engineering, and design have changed our way of seeing the world.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;How the simulation and visualization technologies so pervasive in science, engineering, and design have changed our way of seeing the world.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Over the past twenty years, the technologies of simulation and visualization have changed our ways of looking at the world. In

Synopsis:

Over the past twenty years, the technologies of simulation and visualization have changed our ways of looking at the world. In Simulation and Its Discontents, Sherry Turkle examines the now dominant medium of our working lives and finds that simulation has become its own sensibility. We hear it in Turkle's description of architecture students who no longer design with a pencil, of science and engineering students who admit that computer models seem more "real" than experiments in physical laboratories. Echoing architect Louis Kahn's famous question, "What does a brick want?", Turkle asks, "What does simulation want?" Simulations want, even demand, immersion, and the benefits are clear. Architects create buildings unimaginable before virtual design; scientists determine the structure of molecules by manipulating them in virtual space; physicians practice anatomy on digitized humans. But immersed in simulation, we are vulnerable. There are losses as well as gains. Older scientists describe a younger generation as "drunk with code." Young scientists, engineers, and designers, full citizens of the virtual, scramble to capture their mentors' tacit knowledge of buildings and bodies. From both sides of a generational divide, there is anxiety that in simulation, something important is slipping away. Turkle's examination of simulation over the past twenty years is followed by four in-depth investigations of contemporary simulation culture: space exploration, oceanography, architecture, and biology.

About the Author

Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT and Founder and Director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self. A psychoanalytically trained sociologist and psychologist, she is the author of The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit (Twentieth Anniversary Edition, MIT Press), Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet, and Psychoanalytic Politics: Jacques Lacan and Freud's French Revolution. She is the editor of Evocative Objects: Things We Think With, Falling for Science: Objects in Mind, and The Inner History of Devices, all three published by the MIT Press.William J. Clancey is Chief Scientist of Human-Centered Computing in the Intelligent Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center, and Senior Research Scientist at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262012706
Author:
Turkle, Sherry
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Essay by:
Helmreich, Stefan
Essay by:
Clancey, William J.
Essay:
Clancey, William J.
Essay:
Helmreich, Stefan
Author:
Myers, Natasha
Author:
Myers, Natash
Author:
Loukissas, Yanni A.
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Clancey, William J.
Author:
Helmreich, Stefan
Author:
A
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Simulation methods
Subject:
Visualization
Subject:
Computer simulation
Subject:
Social Aspects - Human-Computer Interaction
Subject:
History
Subject:
Technology
Subject:
Technology -- Social aspects.
Subject:
Technology -- History.
Subject:
Computers Reference-Simulation
Copyright:
Series:
Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life Simulation and Its Discontents
Publication Date:
20090417
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 figures
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
8 x 5.375 x 0.625 in

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Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Computer Simulation
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » Human and Computer Interaction
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » Technology

Simulation and Its Discontents (Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life) New Hardcover
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$24.95 In Stock
Product details 232 pages Mit Press - English 9780262012706 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How the simulation and visualization technologies so pervasive in science, engineering, and design have changed our way of seeing the world.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;How the simulation and visualization technologies so pervasive in science, engineering, and design have changed our way of seeing the world.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , Over the past twenty years, the technologies of simulation and visualization have changed our ways of looking at the world. In
"Synopsis" by , Over the past twenty years, the technologies of simulation and visualization have changed our ways of looking at the world. In Simulation and Its Discontents, Sherry Turkle examines the now dominant medium of our working lives and finds that simulation has become its own sensibility. We hear it in Turkle's description of architecture students who no longer design with a pencil, of science and engineering students who admit that computer models seem more "real" than experiments in physical laboratories. Echoing architect Louis Kahn's famous question, "What does a brick want?", Turkle asks, "What does simulation want?" Simulations want, even demand, immersion, and the benefits are clear. Architects create buildings unimaginable before virtual design; scientists determine the structure of molecules by manipulating them in virtual space; physicians practice anatomy on digitized humans. But immersed in simulation, we are vulnerable. There are losses as well as gains. Older scientists describe a younger generation as "drunk with code." Young scientists, engineers, and designers, full citizens of the virtual, scramble to capture their mentors' tacit knowledge of buildings and bodies. From both sides of a generational divide, there is anxiety that in simulation, something important is slipping away. Turkle's examination of simulation over the past twenty years is followed by four in-depth investigations of contemporary simulation culture: space exploration, oceanography, architecture, and biology.
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