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Living with Complexity

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Living with Complexity Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;If only today's technology were simpler! It's the universal lament, but it's wrong. We don't want simplicity. Simple tools are not up to the task. The world is complex; our tools need to match that complexity. Simplicity turns out to be more complex than we thought. In this provocative and informative book, Don Norman writes that the complexity of our technology must mirror the complexity and richness of our lives. It's not complexity that's the problem, it's bad design. Bad design complicates things unnecessarily and confuses us. Good design can tame complexity.Norman gives us a crash course in the virtues of complexity. But even such simple things as salt and pepper shakers, doors, and light switches become complicated when we have to deal with many of them, each somewhat different. Managing complexity, says Norman, is a partnership. Designers have to produce things that tame complexity. But we too have to do our part: we have to take the time to learn the structure and practice the skills. This is how we mastered reading and writing, driving a car, and playing sports, and this is how we can master our complex tools. Complexity is good. Simplicity is misleading. The good life is complex, rich, and rewarding--but only if it is understandable, sensible, and meaningful.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Why we don't really want simplicity, and how we can learn to live with complexity.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;Why we don't really want simplicity, and how we can learn to live with complexity.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

If only today's technology were simpler It's the universal lament, but it's wrong. We don't want simplicity. Simple tools are not up to the task. The world is complex; our tools need to match that complexity.

Synopsis:

If only today's technology were simpler! It's the universal lament, but it's wrong. We don't want simplicity. Simple tools are not up to the task. The world is complex; our tools need to match that complexity. Simplicity turns out to be more complex than we thought. In this provocative and informative book, Don Norman writes that the complexity of our technology must mirror the complexity and richness of our lives. It's not complexity that's the problem, it's bad design. Bad design complicates things unnecessarily and confuses us. Good design can tame complexity.Norman gives us a crash course in the virtues of complexity. But even such simple things as salt and pepper shakers, doors, and light switches become complicated when we have to deal with many of them, each somewhat different. Managing complexity, says Norman, is a partnership. Designers have to produce things that tame complexity. But we too have to do our part: we have to take the time to learn the structure and practice the skills. This is how we mastered reading and writing, driving a car, and playing sports, and this is how we can master our complex tools. Complexity is good. Simplicity is misleading. The good life is complex, rich, and rewarding — but only if it is understandable, sensible, and meaningful.

About the Author

Business Week has named Don Norman as one of the world's most influential designers. He has been both a professor and an executive: he was Vice President of Advanced Technology at Apple; his company, the Nielsen Norman Group, helps companies produce human-centered products and services; he has been on the faculty at Harvard, the University of California, San Diego, Northwestern University, and KAIST, in South Korea. He is the author of many books, including The Design of Everyday Things, The Invisible Computer (MIT Press, 1998), Emotional Design, and The Design of Future Things.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262014861
Author:
Norman, Donald
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Norman, Donald A.
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Social aspects
Subject:
Aspects
Subject:
General-General
Copyright:
Series:
Living with Complexity
Publication Date:
20101029
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
66
Pages:
312
Dimensions:
8 x 5.375 x 0.75 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Design
Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » Technology

Living with Complexity Used Hardcover
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$18.50 In Stock
Product details 312 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262014861 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Why we don't really want simplicity, and how we can learn to live with complexity.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;Why we don't really want simplicity, and how we can learn to live with complexity.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , If only today's technology were simpler It's the universal lament, but it's wrong. We don't want simplicity. Simple tools are not up to the task. The world is complex; our tools need to match that complexity.
"Synopsis" by , If only today's technology were simpler! It's the universal lament, but it's wrong. We don't want simplicity. Simple tools are not up to the task. The world is complex; our tools need to match that complexity. Simplicity turns out to be more complex than we thought. In this provocative and informative book, Don Norman writes that the complexity of our technology must mirror the complexity and richness of our lives. It's not complexity that's the problem, it's bad design. Bad design complicates things unnecessarily and confuses us. Good design can tame complexity.Norman gives us a crash course in the virtues of complexity. But even such simple things as salt and pepper shakers, doors, and light switches become complicated when we have to deal with many of them, each somewhat different. Managing complexity, says Norman, is a partnership. Designers have to produce things that tame complexity. But we too have to do our part: we have to take the time to learn the structure and practice the skills. This is how we mastered reading and writing, driving a car, and playing sports, and this is how we can master our complex tools. Complexity is good. Simplicity is misleading. The good life is complex, rich, and rewarding — but only if it is understandable, sensible, and meaningful.
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