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Falling for Science: Objects in Mind

by

Falling for Science: Objects in Mind Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


"This is a book about science, technology, and love" writes Sherry Turkle. In it, we learn how a love for science can start with a love for an object: a microscope, a modem, a mud pie, a pair of dice, a fishing rod. Objects fire imagination and set young people on a path to a career in science. In this collection, distinguished scientists, engineers, and designers as well as twenty-five years of MIT students describe how objects encountered in childhood became part of the fabric of their scientific selves. In two major essays that frame the collection, Turkle tells a story of inspiration and connection through objects that is often neglected in standard science education and in our preoccupation with the virtual.

The senior scientists' essays trace the arc of a life: the gears of a toy car introduce the chain of cause and effect to artificial intelligence pioneer Seymour Papert; microscopes disclose the mystery of how things work to MIT President and neuroanatomist Susan Hockfield; architect Moshe Safdie describes how his boyhood fascination with steps, terraces, and the wax hexagons of beehives lead him to a life immersed in the complexities of design. The student essays tell stories that echo these narratives: plastic eggs in an Easter basket reveal the power of centripetal force; experiments with baking illuminate the geology of planets; LEGO bricks model worlds, carefully engineered and colonized.

All of these voices, students and mentors, testify to the power of objects to awaken and inform young scientific minds. This is a truth that is simple, intuitive, and easily overlooked.

Introductory and concluding essays by:
Sherry Turkle.

Mentor essays by:
Susan Hockfield, Donald Ingber, Alan Kay, Sarah Kuhn, Donald Norman, Seymour Papert, Rosalind Picard, Moshe Safdie.

Synopsis:

Passion for objects and love for science: scientists and students reflect on how objects fired their scientific imaginations.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;Passion for objects and love for science: scientists and students reflect on how objects fired their scientific imaginations.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;edited and with an introduction by Sherry Turkle [as per Sherry]andquot;This is a book about science, technology, and love,andquot; writes Sherry Turkle. In it, we learn how a love for science can start with a love for an object--a microscope, a modem, a mud pie, a pair of dice, a fishing rod. Objects fire imagination and set young people on a path to a career in science. In this collection, distinguished scientists, engineers, and designers as well as twenty-five years of MIT students describe how objects encountered in childhood became part of the fabric of their scientific selves. In two major essays that frame the collection, Turkle tells a story of inspiration and connection through objects that is often neglected in standard science education and in our preoccupation with the virtual. The senior scientists' essays trace the arc of a life: the gears of a toy car introduce the chain of cause and effect to artificial intelligence pioneer Seymour Papert; microscopes disclose the mystery of how things work to MIT President and neuroanatomist Susan Hockfield; architect Moshe Safdie describes how his boyhood fascination with steps, terraces, and the wax hexagons of beehives lead him to a life immersed in the complexities of design. The student essays tell stories that echo these narratives: plastic eggs in an Easter basket reveal the power of centripetal force; experiments with baking illuminate the geology of planets; LEGO bricks model worlds, carefully engineered and colonized. All of these voices--students and mentors--testify to the power of objects to awaken and inform young scientific minds. This is a truth that is simple, intuitive, and easily overlooked.Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT and Director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self. She is the author of The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit (Twentieth Anniversary Edition, MIT Press, 2005) and Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet and the editor of Evocative Objects: Things We Think With (MIT Press, 2007).andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

edited and with an introduction by Sherry Turkle as perSherry]This is a book about science, technology, and love, writes SherryTurkle. In it, we learn how a love for science can start with a love for anobject--a microscope, a modem, a mud pie, a pair of dice, a fishing rod. Objectsfire imagination and set young people on a path to a career in science. In thiscollection, distinguished scientists, engineers, and designers as well astwenty-five years of MIT students describe how objects encountered in childhoodbecame part of the fabric of their scientific selves. In two major essays that framethe collection, Turkle tells a story of inspiration and connection through objectsthat is often neglected in standard science education and in our preoccupation withthe virtual. The senior scientists' essays trace the arc of a life: the gears of atoy car introduce the chain of cause and effect to artificial intelligence pioneerSeymour Papert; microscopes disclose the mystery of how things work to MIT Presidentand neuroanatomist Susan Hockfield; architect Moshe Safdie describes how his boyhoodfascination with steps, terraces, and the wax hexagons of beehives lead him to alife immersed in the complexities of design. The student essays tell stories thatecho these narratives: plastic eggs in an Easter basket reveal the power ofcentripetal force; experiments with baking illuminate the geology of planets; LEGObricks model worlds, carefully engineered and colonized. All of thesevoices--students and mentors--testify to the power of objects to awaken and informyoung scientific minds. This is a truth that is simple, intuitive, and easilyoverlooked.Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauz? Professor of the Social Studiesof Science and Technology at MIT and Director of the MIT Initiative on Technologyand Self. She is the author of The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit(Twentieth Anniversary Edition, MIT Press, 2005) and Life on the Screen: Identity inthe Age of the Internet and the editor of Evocative Objects: Things We Think With(MIT Press, 2007).

About the Author

Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT and Founder and Director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self. A psychoanalytically trained sociologist and psychologist, she is the author of The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit (Twentieth Anniversary Edition, MIT Press), Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet, and Psychoanalytic Politics: Jacques Lacan and Freud's French Revolution. She is the editor of Evocative Objects: Things We Think With, Falling for Science: Objects in Mind, and The Inner History of Devices, all three published by the MIT Press.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262201728
Subtitle:
Objects in Mind
Author:
Turkle, Sherry
Editor:
Turkle, Sherry
Author:
Nesheim, Britt
Author:
Brave, Scott
Author:
Schwartz, Steven
Author:
Cull, Shelby
Author:
Greening, Tom
Author:
Kiang, Douglas
Author:
Marlow, Cameron
Author:
Turkle, Sherry
Author:
Esserman, Chuck
Author:
Yoo, Ji
Author:
Trevino, Jose L.
Author:
Norman, Donald A.
Author:
Elkin Lebwohl, Rachel
Author:
Kuhn, Sarah
Author:
Hermitt, Thomas
Author:
Berzowska, Joey
Author:
Licini, Janet Ann
Author:
Calzaretta, Jose
Author:
Seeley Aguirre, Lauren
Author:
Bickmore, Timothy W.
Author:
Townsend, Anthony
Author:
Kaye, Joseph
Author:
Sempere, Andrew
Author:
Kay, Alan
Author:
Marble, Justin
Author:
Alibaruho, Kwatsi
Author:
Lauren Seeley Aguirre
Author:
Story, David Duis
Author:
Dodge, Chris
Author:
Alvarado, Christine
Author:
De Bonte, Austina
Author:
Niemczyk, Steve
Author:
Murtaugh, Michael
Author:
Hockfield, Susan
Author:
Willow, Diane
Author:
Brooker, Robert
Author:
Patten, James
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Marcovitch, Emmanuel
Author:
Weinberg, Gil
Author:
Eltringham, Sandie
Author:
Rachel Elkin Lebwohl
Author:
Grenby, Matt
Author:
Kornhauser, Daniel
Author:
Peretti, Jonah
Author:
Austina De Bonte
Author:
Minar, Nelson
Author:
Safdie, Moshe
Author:
Beaudin, Jennifer
Author:
Chapman, Robbin
Author:
Picard, Rosalind W.
Author:
Intille, Stephen
Author:
Ingber, Donald
Author:
Liu, Alan
Author:
Wilson, Shawn
Author:
Vatz, Maura
Author:
Papert, Seymour A.
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Science
Subject:
Engineering
Subject:
Science -- Study and teaching -- United States.
Subject:
Engineering -- Study and teaching.
Subject:
Science Reference-Essays
Copyright:
Series:
Falling for Science
Publication Date:
April 2008
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
17 band#38;w photos
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8 x 5.375 x 0.6875 in

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Related Subjects

Humanities » Philosophy » General
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » Applied
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Essays

Falling for Science: Objects in Mind Used Hardcover
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Product details 336 pages Mit Press - English 9780262201728 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Passion for objects and love for science: scientists and students reflect on how objects fired their scientific imaginations.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;Passion for objects and love for science: scientists and students reflect on how objects fired their scientific imaginations.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;edited and with an introduction by Sherry Turkle [as per Sherry]andquot;This is a book about science, technology, and love,andquot; writes Sherry Turkle. In it, we learn how a love for science can start with a love for an object--a microscope, a modem, a mud pie, a pair of dice, a fishing rod. Objects fire imagination and set young people on a path to a career in science. In this collection, distinguished scientists, engineers, and designers as well as twenty-five years of MIT students describe how objects encountered in childhood became part of the fabric of their scientific selves. In two major essays that frame the collection, Turkle tells a story of inspiration and connection through objects that is often neglected in standard science education and in our preoccupation with the virtual. The senior scientists' essays trace the arc of a life: the gears of a toy car introduce the chain of cause and effect to artificial intelligence pioneer Seymour Papert; microscopes disclose the mystery of how things work to MIT President and neuroanatomist Susan Hockfield; architect Moshe Safdie describes how his boyhood fascination with steps, terraces, and the wax hexagons of beehives lead him to a life immersed in the complexities of design. The student essays tell stories that echo these narratives: plastic eggs in an Easter basket reveal the power of centripetal force; experiments with baking illuminate the geology of planets; LEGO bricks model worlds, carefully engineered and colonized. All of these voices--students and mentors--testify to the power of objects to awaken and inform young scientific minds. This is a truth that is simple, intuitive, and easily overlooked.Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT and Director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self. She is the author of The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit (Twentieth Anniversary Edition, MIT Press, 2005) and Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet and the editor of Evocative Objects: Things We Think With (MIT Press, 2007).andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , edited and with an introduction by Sherry Turkle as perSherry]This is a book about science, technology, and love, writes SherryTurkle. In it, we learn how a love for science can start with a love for anobject--a microscope, a modem, a mud pie, a pair of dice, a fishing rod. Objectsfire imagination and set young people on a path to a career in science. In thiscollection, distinguished scientists, engineers, and designers as well astwenty-five years of MIT students describe how objects encountered in childhoodbecame part of the fabric of their scientific selves. In two major essays that framethe collection, Turkle tells a story of inspiration and connection through objectsthat is often neglected in standard science education and in our preoccupation withthe virtual. The senior scientists' essays trace the arc of a life: the gears of atoy car introduce the chain of cause and effect to artificial intelligence pioneerSeymour Papert; microscopes disclose the mystery of how things work to MIT Presidentand neuroanatomist Susan Hockfield; architect Moshe Safdie describes how his boyhoodfascination with steps, terraces, and the wax hexagons of beehives lead him to alife immersed in the complexities of design. The student essays tell stories thatecho these narratives: plastic eggs in an Easter basket reveal the power ofcentripetal force; experiments with baking illuminate the geology of planets; LEGObricks model worlds, carefully engineered and colonized. All of thesevoices--students and mentors--testify to the power of objects to awaken and informyoung scientific minds. This is a truth that is simple, intuitive, and easilyoverlooked.Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauz? Professor of the Social Studiesof Science and Technology at MIT and Director of the MIT Initiative on Technologyand Self. She is the author of The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit(Twentieth Anniversary Edition, MIT Press, 2005) and Life on the Screen: Identity inthe Age of the Internet and the editor of Evocative Objects: Things We Think With(MIT Press, 2007).
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