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Nightwork: A History of Hacks and Pranks at MIT

by

Nightwork: A History of Hacks and Pranks at MIT Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;An MIT "hack" is an ingenious, benign, andanonymous prank or practical joke, often requiring engineering or scientificexpertise and often pulled off under cover of darkness — instances of campus mischief sometimes coinciding withApril Fool's Day, final exams, or commencement. (It should not beconfused with the sometimes nonbenign phenomenon of computer hacking.)Noteworthy MIT hacks over the years include the legendary Harvard--YaleFootball Game Hack (when a weather balloon emblazoned andquot;MITandquot; poppedout of the ground near the 50-yard line), the campus police car found perchedon the Great Dome, the apparent disappearance of the Institute president'soffice, and a faux cathedral (complete with stained glass windows, organ, andwedding ceremony) in a lobby. Hacks are by their nature ephemeral, althoughthey live on in the memory of both perpetrators and spectators. Nightwork,drawing on the MIT Museum's unique collection of hack-related photographsand other materials, describes and documents the best of MIT's hacks andhacking culture. Thisgenerously illustrated updated edition has added coverage of such recent hacksas the cross-country abduction of rival Caltech's cannon (a prankrequiring months of planning, intricate choreography, and last-minute improvisation),a fire truck on the Dome that marked the fifth anniversary of 9/11, andnumerous pokes at the celebrated Frank Gehry-designed Stata Center, and even aworking solar-powered Red Line subway car on the Great Dome. Hackshave been said to express the essence of MIT, providing, as alumnusAndre DeHon observes, "an opportunity todemonstrate creativity and know-how in mastering the physical world."What better way to mark the 150th anniversary of MIT's founding than tocommemorate its native ingenuity with this new edition of Nightwork?andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

A lively introduction to MIT hacks, from the police car on the Great Dome to the abduction of the Caltech cannon.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;A lively introduction to MIT hacks, from the police car on the Great Dome to the abduction of the Caltech cannon.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

An MIT hack is an ingenious, benign, andanonymous prank or practicaljoke, often requiring engineering or scientificexpertise and often pulled off undercover of darkness — instances of campus mischief sometimes coinciding withAprilFool's Day, final exams, or commencement. (It should not beconfused with thesometimes nonbenign phenomenon of computer hacking.)Noteworthy MIT hacks over theyears include the legendary Harvard--YaleFootball Game Hack (when a weather balloonemblazoned MIT poppedout of the ground near the 50-yard line), thecampus police car found perchedon the Great Dome, the apparent disappearance of theInstitute president'soffice, and a faux cathedral (complete with stained glasswindows, organ, andwedding ceremony) in a lobby. Hacks are by their natureephemeral, althoughthey live on in the memory of both perpetrators and spectators.Nightwork, drawing on the MIT Museum's unique collection of hack-relatedphotographsand other materials, describes and documents the best of MIT's hacksandhacking culture. Thisgenerously illustrated updated edition has added coverage ofsuch recent hacksas the cross-country abduction of rival Caltech's cannon (aprankrequiring months of planning, intricate choreography, and last-minuteimprovisation), a fire truck on the Dome that marked the fifth anniversary of 9/11, andnumerous pokes at the celebrated Frank Gehry-designed Stata Center, and evenaworking solar-powered Red Line subway car on the Great Dome. Hackshave been said toexpress the essence of MIT, providing, as alumnusAndre DeHon observes, anopportunity todemonstrate creativity and know-how in mastering the physicalworld.What better way to mark the 150th anniversary of MIT's founding thantocommemorate its native ingenuity with this new edition of Nightwork?

Synopsis:

An MIT hack is an ingenious, benign, and anonymous prank or practical joke, often requiring engineering or scientific expertise and often pulled off under cover of darkness--instances of campus mischief sometimes coinciding with April Fool's Day, final exams, or commencement. (It should not be confused with the sometimes nonbenign phenomenon of computer hacking.) Noteworthy MIT hacks over the years include the legendary Harvard-Yale Football Game Hack (when a weather balloon emblazoned MIT popped out of the ground near the 50-yard line), the campus police car found perched on the Great Dome, the apparent disappearance of the Institute president's office, and a faux cathedral (complete with stained glass windows, organ, and wedding ceremony) in a lobby. Hacks are by their nature ephemeral, although they live on in the memory of both perpetrators and spectators.

About the Author

Institute Historian T. F. Peterson has spent many years lurking in the corridors of MIT picking up gossip and monitoring hacks in progress.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262515849
Author:
Peterson, T. F.
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Peterson, Institute Historian T. F.
Author:
Bender, Eric
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Education-Higher Education
Edition Description:
updated edition
Series:
Nightwork
Publication Date:
20110331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
77 color illus., 65 b, &, w illus.
Pages:
248
Dimensions:
9 x 8 x 1 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » History and Society
Education » Higher Education
Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General

Nightwork: A History of Hacks and Pranks at MIT New Trade Paper
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Product details 248 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262515849 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A lively introduction to MIT hacks, from the police car on the Great Dome to the abduction of the Caltech cannon.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;A lively introduction to MIT hacks, from the police car on the Great Dome to the abduction of the Caltech cannon.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , An MIT hack is an ingenious, benign, andanonymous prank or practicaljoke, often requiring engineering or scientificexpertise and often pulled off undercover of darkness — instances of campus mischief sometimes coinciding withAprilFool's Day, final exams, or commencement. (It should not beconfused with thesometimes nonbenign phenomenon of computer hacking.)Noteworthy MIT hacks over theyears include the legendary Harvard--YaleFootball Game Hack (when a weather balloonemblazoned MIT poppedout of the ground near the 50-yard line), thecampus police car found perchedon the Great Dome, the apparent disappearance of theInstitute president'soffice, and a faux cathedral (complete with stained glasswindows, organ, andwedding ceremony) in a lobby. Hacks are by their natureephemeral, althoughthey live on in the memory of both perpetrators and spectators.Nightwork, drawing on the MIT Museum's unique collection of hack-relatedphotographsand other materials, describes and documents the best of MIT's hacksandhacking culture. Thisgenerously illustrated updated edition has added coverage ofsuch recent hacksas the cross-country abduction of rival Caltech's cannon (aprankrequiring months of planning, intricate choreography, and last-minuteimprovisation), a fire truck on the Dome that marked the fifth anniversary of 9/11, andnumerous pokes at the celebrated Frank Gehry-designed Stata Center, and evenaworking solar-powered Red Line subway car on the Great Dome. Hackshave been said toexpress the essence of MIT, providing, as alumnusAndre DeHon observes, anopportunity todemonstrate creativity and know-how in mastering the physicalworld.What better way to mark the 150th anniversary of MIT's founding thantocommemorate its native ingenuity with this new edition of Nightwork?
"Synopsis" by , An MIT hack is an ingenious, benign, and anonymous prank or practical joke, often requiring engineering or scientific expertise and often pulled off under cover of darkness--instances of campus mischief sometimes coinciding with April Fool's Day, final exams, or commencement. (It should not be confused with the sometimes nonbenign phenomenon of computer hacking.) Noteworthy MIT hacks over the years include the legendary Harvard-Yale Football Game Hack (when a weather balloon emblazoned MIT popped out of the ground near the 50-yard line), the campus police car found perched on the Great Dome, the apparent disappearance of the Institute president's office, and a faux cathedral (complete with stained glass windows, organ, and wedding ceremony) in a lobby. Hacks are by their nature ephemeral, although they live on in the memory of both perpetrators and spectators.
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