Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 20, 2014

Julie Schumacher: IMG Dear Professor Fitger



Saint Paul, August 2014 Dear Professor Fitger, I've been asked to say a few words about you for Powells.com. Having dreamed you up with a ball-point... Continue »
  1. $16.07 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Dear Committee Members

    Julie Schumacher 9780385538138

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$8.50
List price: $16.95
Sale Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Beaverton Science Reference- General

This title in other editions

Lab Coats in Hollywood: Science, Scientists, and Cinema

by

Lab Coats in Hollywood: Science, Scientists, and Cinema Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Stanley Kubrick's andlt;Iandgt; 2001: A Space Odysseyandlt;/Iandgt;, released in 1968, is perhaps the most scientifically accurate film ever produced. The film presented such a plausible, realistic vision of space flight that many moon hoax proponents believe that Kubrick staged the 1969 moon landing using the same studios and techniques. Kubrick's scientific verisimilitude in andlt;Iandgt;2001andlt;/Iandgt; came courtesy of his science consultants — including two former NASA scientists — and the more than sixty-five companies, research organizations, and government agencies that offered technical advice. Although most filmmakers don't consult experts as extensively as Kubrick did, films ranging from andlt;Iandgt;A Beautiful Mindandlt;/Iandgt; and andlt;Iandgt;Contactandlt;/Iandgt; to andlt;Iandgt;Finding Nemoandlt;/Iandgt; and andlt;Iandgt;The Hulkandlt;/Iandgt; have achieved some degree of scientific credibility because of science consultants. I andlt;Iandgt;n Lab Coats in Hollywoodandlt;/Iandgt;, David Kirby examines the interaction of science and cinema: how science consultants make movie science plausible, how filmmakers negotiate scientific accuracy within production constraints, and how movies affect popular perceptions of science. Drawing on interviews and archival material, Kirby examines such science consulting tasks as fact checking and shaping visual iconography. Kirby finds that cinema can influence science as well: Depictions of science in popular films can promote research agendas, stimulate technological development, and even stir citizens into political action. andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

How science consultants make movie science plausible, in films ranging from 2001: A Space Odyssey to Finding Nemo.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;How science consultants make movie science plausible, in films ranging from 2001: A Space Odyssey to Finding Nemo.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, released in 1968, is perhaps the most scientifically accurate film ever produced. The film presented such a plausible, realistic vision of space flight that many moon hoax proponents believe that Kubrick staged the 1969 moon landing using the same studios and techniques. Kubrick's scientific verisimilitude in 2001 came courtesy of his science consultants — including two former NASA scientists — and the more than sixty-five companies, research organizations, and government agencies that offered technical advice. Although most filmmakers don't consult experts as extensively as Kubrick did, films ranging from A Beautiful Mind and Contact to Finding Nemo and The Hulk have achieved some degree of scientific credibility because of science consultants. I n Lab Coats in Hollywood, David Kirby examines the interaction of science and cinema: how science consultants make movie science plausible, how filmmakers negotiate scientific accuracy within production constraints, and how movies affect popular perceptions of science. Drawing on interviews and archival material, Kirby examines such science consulting tasks as fact checking and shaping visual iconography. Kirby finds that cinema can influence science as well: Depictions of science in popular films can promote research agendas, stimulate technological development, and even stir citizens into political action.

About the Author

David A. Kirby is Senior Lecturer in Science Communication Studies at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine at the University of Manchester, England.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262518703
Subtitle:
Science, Scientists, and Cinema
Author:
Kirby, David A
Author:
Kirby, David A.
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Philosophy & Aspects
Subject:
Science Reference-Technology
Subject:
Film and Television-History and Criticism
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Lab Coats in Hollywood
Publication Date:
20130208
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
74 b, &, w illus., 1 figure
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.5625 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Film and Video
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » History and Criticism
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » History and Society
Reference » Science Reference » General
Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » New Arrivals

Lab Coats in Hollywood: Science, Scientists, and Cinema Sale Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.50 In Stock
Product details 280 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262518703 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How science consultants make movie science plausible, in films ranging from 2001: A Space Odyssey to Finding Nemo.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;How science consultants make movie science plausible, in films ranging from 2001: A Space Odyssey to Finding Nemo.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, released in 1968, is perhaps the most scientifically accurate film ever produced. The film presented such a plausible, realistic vision of space flight that many moon hoax proponents believe that Kubrick staged the 1969 moon landing using the same studios and techniques. Kubrick's scientific verisimilitude in 2001 came courtesy of his science consultants — including two former NASA scientists — and the more than sixty-five companies, research organizations, and government agencies that offered technical advice. Although most filmmakers don't consult experts as extensively as Kubrick did, films ranging from A Beautiful Mind and Contact to Finding Nemo and The Hulk have achieved some degree of scientific credibility because of science consultants. I n Lab Coats in Hollywood, David Kirby examines the interaction of science and cinema: how science consultants make movie science plausible, how filmmakers negotiate scientific accuracy within production constraints, and how movies affect popular perceptions of science. Drawing on interviews and archival material, Kirby examines such science consulting tasks as fact checking and shaping visual iconography. Kirby finds that cinema can influence science as well: Depictions of science in popular films can promote research agendas, stimulate technological development, and even stir citizens into political action.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.