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Peter StarkIt's hard to believe that 200 years ago, the Pacific Northwest was one of the most remote and isolated regions in the world. In 1810, four years... Continue »
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The People Are Dancing Again: The History of the Siletz Tribe of Western Oregon

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The People Are Dancing Again: The History of the Siletz Tribe of Western Oregon Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The history of the Siletz is in many ways the history of many Indian tribes: a story of heartache, perseverance, survival, and revival. The history of the Siletz people began in a resource-rich homeland thousands of years ago. Today, the tribe is a vibrant, modern community with a deeply held commitment to tradition.

The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians — twenty-seven tribes speaking at least ten languages — were brought together on the Oregon Coast through treaties with the federal government in 1853-55. For decades after, the Siletz people lost many traditional practices, saw their languages almost wiped out, and experienced poverty, ill health, and humiliation. Again and again, the federal government took great chunks of the magnificent, timber-rich tribal homeland, reducing their reservation from the original allotment of 1.1 million acres — which reached a full 100 miles north to south on the Oregon Coast — to what is today several hundred acres of land near Siletz and 9,000 acres of forest. By 1956, the tribe had been "terminated" under the Western Oregon Indian Termination Act, selling off the remaining land, cutting off federal health and education benefits, and denying tribal status. Poverty worsened, and the sense of cultural loss deepened.

The Siletz people refused to give in. In 1977, after years of work and appeals to Congress, they became the second tribe in the nation to have its federal status, treaty rights, and sovereignty restored. With federal recognition of the tribe came a profound cultural revival among the Siletz people.

This remarkable account, written by one of the nation's most respected experts in tribal law and history, is rich in Indian voices and grounded in extensive research that includes oral tradition and personal interviews. It is a book that not only provides a deep and beautifully written account of the history of the Siletz, but reaches beyond region and tribe to tell a story that will inform the way all of us think about the past

Review:

"This book is well researched and beautifully documented, and is most accessible to the general reading public. It is, in many respects, a picture of the entire history of Native American policy." Rennard Strickland (Osage/Cherokee), author of Tonto's Revenge: Reflections on American Indian Culture and Policy

Review:

"Charles Wilkinson captures the Siletz people's long journey of betrayal and rejuvenation with such warmth, insight, and engagement that a reader feels privileged to share in it." Frank Pommersheim, author of Broken Landscape: Indians, Indian Tribes, and the Constitution

Synopsis:

This remarkable account, written by Charles Wilkinson, one of the nation's most respected experts in tribal law and history, is rich in the Indian voice and grounded in extensive research that includes oral tradition and personal interviews. The history of the Siletz is in many ways the history of all Indian tribes in America: a story of heartache, perseverance, survival, and revival. It began in a resourcerich homeland thousands of years ago and today finds a vibrant, modern community with a deeply held commitment to tradition.

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About the Author

Charles Wilkinson is Distinguished University Professor and Moses Lasky Professor of Law, University of Colorado Law School. He is the author of many books, including Messages from Frank's Landing: A Story of Salmon, Treaties, and the Indian Way and Blood Struggle: The Rise of Modern Indian Nations.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780295990668
Author:
Wilkinson, Charles
Publisher:
University of Washington Press
Subject:
Native American
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Pacific Northwest
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Native American Studies
Subject:
Native American Studies; Northwest History
Subject:
Native American Studies
Subject:
Northwest History
Subject:
Native American-General Native American Studies
Publication Date:
20101031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
576
Dimensions:
7 x 10 in

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Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » Native American » Pacific Northwest
History and Social Science » World History » General

The People Are Dancing Again: The History of the Siletz Tribe of Western Oregon New Hardcover
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$35.00 In Stock
Product details 576 pages University of Washington Press - English 9780295990668 Reviews:
"Review" by , "This book is well researched and beautifully documented, and is most accessible to the general reading public. It is, in many respects, a picture of the entire history of Native American policy." Rennard Strickland (Osage/Cherokee), author of Tonto's Revenge: Reflections on American Indian Culture and Policy
"Review" by , "Charles Wilkinson captures the Siletz people's long journey of betrayal and rejuvenation with such warmth, insight, and engagement that a reader feels privileged to share in it."
"Synopsis" by , This remarkable account, written by Charles Wilkinson, one of the nation's most respected experts in tribal law and history, is rich in the Indian voice and grounded in extensive research that includes oral tradition and personal interviews. The history of the Siletz is in many ways the history of all Indian tribes in America: a story of heartache, perseverance, survival, and revival. It began in a resourcerich homeland thousands of years ago and today finds a vibrant, modern community with a deeply held commitment to tradition.
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