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Monopoly: The World's Most Famous Game - And How It Got That Way

by

Monopoly: The World's Most Famous Game - And How It Got That Way Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Over 200,000,000 copies of the Monopoly game have been sold worldwide since Parker Brothers first popularized it in 1935, making it the world's most popular proprietary game. Countless special and national editions of the game are now published in over sixty countries. But while Monopoly has global appeal, it is distinctly American — a symbol of America's system of economic opportunity. In Monopoly: America's Game, Philip Orbanes, the leading expert on all things Monopoliana, tells the remarkable history of the game, from its predecessor's birth as a teaching tool for an economics class in the first decade of the twentieth century through its explosive growth in the post-war decades to it being a ubiquitous fixture in just about every American home today. Orbanes includes fascinating Monopoly personality portraits, little-known Monopoly legends and lore, and the extraordinary variety of advertising used throughout the twentieth century. This is the first and only book to cover comprehensively the origin, growth, and global impact of the game that has become a cultural icon.

Review:

"In his account of the development of 'the most significant money game in history' (200 million copies sold in 60 countries since 1935), former Parker Brothers vice president Orbanes (The Monopoly Companion) sets the game against a backdrop of political and economic events spanning a century. He introduces entrepreneurs and game inventors, beginning with Elizabeth Magie, who created the Landlord's Game in 1903 to educate people about Henry George's idea of a 'single tax' on landlords (it even had a space called 'No Trespassing/Go to Jail'). Initially unpublished, it circulated among game players in handmade copies on oilcloth. In 1930, Quakers in Atlantic City added local street names — Illinois, Pennsylvania, Mediterranean — to their handmade variation, which became the source of the Monopoly game that Charles Darrow marketed in 1934. Tracing this evolution, Orbanes covers collectors, foreign editions, memorabilia, licensing, copyrights and trademarks with fascinating details: Esquire magazine's Esky was the springboard for Monopoly's cartoon financier, and the metal tokens were inspired by the charms from charm bracelets that Darrow's 11-year-old niece used as game pieces. Orbanes heightens the readability by interweaving his own personal story — at Parker Brothers, which he joined in 1979, and judging Monopoly world tournaments — throughout this lively chronicle that puts the iconic game in the context of a slice of social history. 32 pages of b&w photos, 40 illus. throughout. (Nov. 30)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright © Reed Business Informatio)

Review:

"In his account of the development of 'the most significant money game in history' (200 million copies sold in 60 countries since 1935), former Parker Brothers vice president Orbanes (The Monopoly Companion) sets the game against a backdrop of political and economic events spanning a century. He introduces entrepreneurs and game inventors, beginning with Elizabeth Magie, who created the Landlord's Game in 1903 to educate people about Henry George's idea of a 'single tax' on landlords (it even had a space called 'No Trespassing/Go to Jail'). Initially unpublished, it circulated among game players in handmade copies on oilcloth. In 1930, Quakers in Atlantic City added local street names — Illinois, Pennsylvania, Mediterranean — to their handmade variation, which became the source of the Monopoly game that Charles Darrow marketed in 1934. Tracing this evolution, Orbanes covers collectors, foreign editions, memorabilia, licensing, copyrights and trademarks with fascinating details: Esquire magazine's Esky was the springboard for Monopoly's cartoon financier, and the metal tokens were inspired by the charms from charm bracelets that Darrow's 11-year-old niece used as game pieces. Orbanes heightens the readability by interweaving his own personal story — at Parker Brothers, which he joined in 1979, and judging Monopoly world tournaments — throughout this lively chronicle that puts the iconic game in the context of a slice of social history. 32 pages of b&w photos, 40 illus. throughout." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

Philip E. Orbanes is currently President of the specialty games company Winning Moves. He has been a Senior Vice President of Research and Development at Parker Brothers, and is now a consulting member of the board of directors for Hasbro Games. He has been the chief judge at Monopoly championships since 1979. He is the author of The Game Makers and the best-selling book Monopoly Companion. He lives in Massachusetts.

Review:

"[A] delightful though unobjective title filled with facts, photos, and personal impressions." Library Journal

Review:

"The author's clear love of the game is infectious, making for an enjoyable and entertaining read." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Orbanes, the leading expert on all things Monopoliana, tells the remarkable history of the game, from its predecessor's birth as a teaching tool for an economics class in the first decade of the 20th century through its explosive growth in the post-war decades to it being a ubiquitous fixture in just about every American home today.

About the Author

Philip E. Orbanes has been the chief judge at Monopoly championships since 1979, and is the author of Game Makers and the best-selling book Monopoly Companion. He lives in Massachusetts.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780306814891
Subtitle:
The World's Most Famous Game--And How It Got That Way
Author:
Orbanes, Philip E
Author:
Orbanes, Philip E.
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Subject:
History
Subject:
Monopoly (Game)
Subject:
Board games
Subject:
Board
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
Sociology - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20061023
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 18 oz

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Related Subjects

Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Board Games
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Miscellaneous Games

Monopoly: The World's Most Famous Game - And How It Got That Way Used Hardcover
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Product details 280 pages Da Capo Press - English 9780306814891 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In his account of the development of 'the most significant money game in history' (200 million copies sold in 60 countries since 1935), former Parker Brothers vice president Orbanes (The Monopoly Companion) sets the game against a backdrop of political and economic events spanning a century. He introduces entrepreneurs and game inventors, beginning with Elizabeth Magie, who created the Landlord's Game in 1903 to educate people about Henry George's idea of a 'single tax' on landlords (it even had a space called 'No Trespassing/Go to Jail'). Initially unpublished, it circulated among game players in handmade copies on oilcloth. In 1930, Quakers in Atlantic City added local street names — Illinois, Pennsylvania, Mediterranean — to their handmade variation, which became the source of the Monopoly game that Charles Darrow marketed in 1934. Tracing this evolution, Orbanes covers collectors, foreign editions, memorabilia, licensing, copyrights and trademarks with fascinating details: Esquire magazine's Esky was the springboard for Monopoly's cartoon financier, and the metal tokens were inspired by the charms from charm bracelets that Darrow's 11-year-old niece used as game pieces. Orbanes heightens the readability by interweaving his own personal story — at Parker Brothers, which he joined in 1979, and judging Monopoly world tournaments — throughout this lively chronicle that puts the iconic game in the context of a slice of social history. 32 pages of b&w photos, 40 illus. throughout. (Nov. 30)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright © Reed Business Informatio)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In his account of the development of 'the most significant money game in history' (200 million copies sold in 60 countries since 1935), former Parker Brothers vice president Orbanes (The Monopoly Companion) sets the game against a backdrop of political and economic events spanning a century. He introduces entrepreneurs and game inventors, beginning with Elizabeth Magie, who created the Landlord's Game in 1903 to educate people about Henry George's idea of a 'single tax' on landlords (it even had a space called 'No Trespassing/Go to Jail'). Initially unpublished, it circulated among game players in handmade copies on oilcloth. In 1930, Quakers in Atlantic City added local street names — Illinois, Pennsylvania, Mediterranean — to their handmade variation, which became the source of the Monopoly game that Charles Darrow marketed in 1934. Tracing this evolution, Orbanes covers collectors, foreign editions, memorabilia, licensing, copyrights and trademarks with fascinating details: Esquire magazine's Esky was the springboard for Monopoly's cartoon financier, and the metal tokens were inspired by the charms from charm bracelets that Darrow's 11-year-old niece used as game pieces. Orbanes heightens the readability by interweaving his own personal story — at Parker Brothers, which he joined in 1979, and judging Monopoly world tournaments — throughout this lively chronicle that puts the iconic game in the context of a slice of social history. 32 pages of b&w photos, 40 illus. throughout." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , Philip E. Orbanes is currently President of the specialty games company Winning Moves. He has been a Senior Vice President of Research and Development at Parker Brothers, and is now a consulting member of the board of directors for Hasbro Games. He has been the chief judge at Monopoly championships since 1979. He is the author of The Game Makers and the best-selling book Monopoly Companion. He lives in Massachusetts.
"Review" by , "[A] delightful though unobjective title filled with facts, photos, and personal impressions."
"Review" by , "The author's clear love of the game is infectious, making for an enjoyable and entertaining read."
"Synopsis" by , Orbanes, the leading expert on all things Monopoliana, tells the remarkable history of the game, from its predecessor's birth as a teaching tool for an economics class in the first decade of the 20th century through its explosive growth in the post-war decades to it being a ubiquitous fixture in just about every American home today.
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