Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 18, 2014

Ian Leslie: IMG Empathic Curiosity



Today, we wonder anxiously if digital media is changing our brains. But if there's any time in history when our mental operations changed... Continue »
  1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$2.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Local Warehouse Health and Medicine- Essays

More copies of this ISBN

Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality

by

Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A brilliant young transplant surgeon brings moral intensity and narrative drama to the most powerful and vexing questions of medicine and the human condition.

When Pauline Chen began medical school twenty years ago, she dreamed of saving lives. What she did not count on was how much death would be a part of her work. Almost immediately, Chen found herself wrestling with medicines most profound paradox, that a profession premised on caring for the ill also systematically depersonalizes dying. Final Exam follows Chen over the course of her education, training, and practice as she grapples at strikingly close range with the problem of mortality, and struggles to reconcile the lessons of her training with her innate knowledge of shared humanity, and to separate her ideas about healing from her fierce desire to cure.

From her first dissection of a cadaver in gross anatomy to the moment she first puts a scalpel to a living person; from the first time she witnesses someone flatlining in the emergency room to the first time she pronounces a patient dead, Chen is struck by her own mortal fears: there was a dying friend she could not call; a young patients tortured death she could not forget; even the sense of shared kinship with a corpse she could not cast aside when asked to saw its pelvis in two. Gradually, as she confronts the ways in which her fears have incapacitated her, she begins to reject what she has been taught about suppressing her feelings for her patients, and she begins to carve out a new role for herself as a physician and as human being. Chens transfixing and beautiful rumination on how doctors negotiate the ineluctable fact of death becomes, in the end, a brilliant questioning of how we should live.

Moving and provocative, motored equally by clinical expertise and extraordinary personal grace, this is a piercing and compassionate journey into the heart of a world that is hidden and yet touches all of our lives. A superb addition to the best medical literature of our time.

Review:

"Like most physicians, Chen, a transplant surgeon and former UCLA faculty member, entered medicine in order to save lives. But as a medical student in the 1980s, she discovered that she had to face death repeatedly and 'found disturbing inconsistencies' as she learned from teachers and colleagues 'to suspend or suppress any shared human feelings for my dying patients.' Chen writes with immaculately honed prose and moral passion as she recounts her quest to overcome 'lessons in denial and depersonalization,' vividly evoking the paradoxes of end-of-life care in an age of life-preserving treatments. Chen charts her personal and professional rites of passage in dealing with mortality, from her first dissection of a human cadaver, through the first time she pronounces a patient dead, to having to officially took responsibility for the accidental death of a patient in her care. Focusing on the enormous moral and psychological pressures on doctors and on the need for greater empathy in hospital end-of-life care, Chen also reports on signs of change within the profession, stemming from both criticisms of training and institutions and from physicians' initiatives to bring a greater sense of shared humanity to their work." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Like most physicians, Chen, a transplant surgeon and former UCLA faculty member, entered medicine in order to save lives. But as a medical student in the 1980s, she discovered that she had to face death repeatedly and 'found disturbing inconsistencies' as she learned from teachers and colleagues 'to suspend or suppress any shared human feelings for my dying patients.' Chen writes with immaculately honed prose and moral passion as she recounts her quest to overcome 'lessons in denial and depersonalization,' vividly evoking the paradoxes of end-of-life care in an age of life-preserving treatments. Chen charts her personal and professional rites of passage in dealing with mortality, from her first dissection of a human cadaver, through the first time she pronounces a patient dead, to having to officially took responsibility for the accidental death of a patient in her care. Focusing on the enormous moral and psychological pressures on doctors and on the need for greater empathy in hospital end-of-life care, Chen also reports on signs of change within the profession, stemming from both criticisms of training and institutions and from physicians' initiatives to bring a greater sense of shared humanity to their work. Announced first printing of 75,000. (Jan. 17)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Final Exam is a revealing and heartfelt book. Pauline Chen takes us where few do — inside the feeling of practicing surgery, with its doubts, failures, and triumphs. Her tales are also uncommonly moving, most especially when contemplating death and our difficulties as doctors and patients in coming to grips with it." Atul Gawande

Review:

"A series of thoughtful, moving essays on the troubled relationship between modern medical practice and the emotional events surrounding death....Dr. Chen vividly conveys the fears and anxieties of medical training, as well as its pleasures." William Grimes, New York Times

Synopsis:

From her first dissection of a cadaver to the first time she pronounced a patient dead, Chen combines personal experience with clinical expertise in this riveting, deeply nuanced critique of the medical profession.

About the Author

Pauline W. Chen attended Harvard University and the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and completed her surgical training at Yale University, the National Cancer Institute (National Institutes of Health), and UCLA, where she was most recently a member of the faculty. In 1999, she was named the UCLA Outstanding Physician of the Year. Dr. Chen’s first nationally published piece, "Dead Enough? The Paradox of Brain Death," appeared in the fall 2005 issue of The Virginia Quarterly Review and was a finalist for a 2006 National Magazine Award. She is also the 2005 cowinner of the Staige D. Blackford Prize for Nonfiction and was a finalist for the 2002 James Kirkwood Prize in Creative Writing. She lives near Boston with her husband and children.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307263537
Subtitle:
A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality
Author:
Chen, Pauline W
Author:
Chen, Pauline W.
Publisher:
Knopf
Subject:
General
Subject:
Surgery - General
Subject:
Terminal care
Subject:
Medical - Physicians
Subject:
General Health & Fitness
Subject:
Biography/Medical
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20070109
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
7.82x5.30x1.12 in. .83 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Physician's Guide to Coping with... Used Trade Paper $10.50
  2. Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on...
    Used Trade Paper $5.95
  3. Kill as Few Patients as Possible:... Used Trade Paper $5.50
  4. An anthropologist on Mars :seven... Used Hardcover $8.95
  5. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a...
    Sale Trade Paper $7.98
  6. The Disposable American Used Hardcover $1.98

Related Subjects

Biography » Medical
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Essays
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties

Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$2.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Alfred A. Knopf - English 9780307263537 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Like most physicians, Chen, a transplant surgeon and former UCLA faculty member, entered medicine in order to save lives. But as a medical student in the 1980s, she discovered that she had to face death repeatedly and 'found disturbing inconsistencies' as she learned from teachers and colleagues 'to suspend or suppress any shared human feelings for my dying patients.' Chen writes with immaculately honed prose and moral passion as she recounts her quest to overcome 'lessons in denial and depersonalization,' vividly evoking the paradoxes of end-of-life care in an age of life-preserving treatments. Chen charts her personal and professional rites of passage in dealing with mortality, from her first dissection of a human cadaver, through the first time she pronounces a patient dead, to having to officially took responsibility for the accidental death of a patient in her care. Focusing on the enormous moral and psychological pressures on doctors and on the need for greater empathy in hospital end-of-life care, Chen also reports on signs of change within the profession, stemming from both criticisms of training and institutions and from physicians' initiatives to bring a greater sense of shared humanity to their work." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Like most physicians, Chen, a transplant surgeon and former UCLA faculty member, entered medicine in order to save lives. But as a medical student in the 1980s, she discovered that she had to face death repeatedly and 'found disturbing inconsistencies' as she learned from teachers and colleagues 'to suspend or suppress any shared human feelings for my dying patients.' Chen writes with immaculately honed prose and moral passion as she recounts her quest to overcome 'lessons in denial and depersonalization,' vividly evoking the paradoxes of end-of-life care in an age of life-preserving treatments. Chen charts her personal and professional rites of passage in dealing with mortality, from her first dissection of a human cadaver, through the first time she pronounces a patient dead, to having to officially took responsibility for the accidental death of a patient in her care. Focusing on the enormous moral and psychological pressures on doctors and on the need for greater empathy in hospital end-of-life care, Chen also reports on signs of change within the profession, stemming from both criticisms of training and institutions and from physicians' initiatives to bring a greater sense of shared humanity to their work. Announced first printing of 75,000. (Jan. 17)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Final Exam is a revealing and heartfelt book. Pauline Chen takes us where few do — inside the feeling of practicing surgery, with its doubts, failures, and triumphs. Her tales are also uncommonly moving, most especially when contemplating death and our difficulties as doctors and patients in coming to grips with it."
"Review" by , "A series of thoughtful, moving essays on the troubled relationship between modern medical practice and the emotional events surrounding death....Dr. Chen vividly conveys the fears and anxieties of medical training, as well as its pleasures."
"Synopsis" by , From her first dissection of a cadaver to the first time she pronounced a patient dead, Chen combines personal experience with clinical expertise in this riveting, deeply nuanced critique of the medical profession.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.