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2 Beaverton Nature Studies- Reptiles and Amphibians

Stolen World: A Tale of Reptiles, Smugglers, and Skulduggery

by

Stolen World: A Tale of Reptiles, Smugglers, and Skulduggery Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Tortoises disappear from a Madagascar reserve and reappear in the Bronx Zoo. A dead iguana floats in a jar, awaiting its unveiling in a Florida court. A viper causes mayhem from Ethiopia to Virginia. In Stolen World, Jennie Erin Smith takes the reader on an unforgettable journey, a dark adventure over five decades and six continents. 

 

In 1965, Hank Molt, a young cheese salesman from Philadelphia, reinvented himself as a “specialist dealer in rare fauna,” traveling the world to collect exquisite reptiles for zoos and museums. By the end of the decade that followed, new endangered species laws had turned Molt into a convicted smuggler, and an unrepentant one, who went on to provide many of the same rare reptiles to many of the same institutions, covertly. 

But Molt soon found a rival in Tommy Crutchfield, a Florida carpet salesman with every intention of usurping Molt as the most accomplished reptile smuggler in the country. Like Molt, Crutchfield had modeled himself after an earlier generation of natural-history collectors celebrated for their service to science, an ideal that, for Molt and Crutchfield, eclipsed the realities of the new wildlife-protection laws. Zoo curators, caught between a desire for rare animals and the conservation-minded focus of their institutions, became the smugglers’ antagonists in court but also their best customers, sometimes simultaneously. 

Crutchfield forged ties with a criminally inclined Malaysian wildlife trader and emerged a millionaire, beloved by some of the finest zoos in the world. Molt, following a string of inventive but disastrous smuggling schemes in New Guinea, was reduced to hanging around Crutchfield’s Florida compound, plotting Crutchfield’s demise. The fallout from their feud would result in a major federal investigation with tentacles in Germany, Madagascar, Holland, and Malaysia. And yet even after prison, personal ruin, and the depredations of age, Molt and Crutchfield never stopped scheming, never stopped longing for the snake or lizard that would earn each his rightful place in a world that had forgotten them—or rather, had never recognized them to begin with.

Review:

"In this very disturbing and very entertaining chronicle of reptile smugglers, the collectors and zoo keepers who trade with them, and the federal agents who try to catch them, the humans are as devious, dangerous, and creepily charming as the cold-blooded creatures they lust after. Science reporter Smith bases her book on extensive original interviews with two smugglers: Henry Molt Jr. is a reptile dealer who, in the 1960s, unable to get a job with a zoo, began a lifelong career of reptile collecting involving restless international travel, partner-stiffing, and jail time, with an undaunted enthusiasm that's survived into his 60s: 'The reptile business ‘is a disease,' he said, and you can't retire from a disease.' Equally outrageous is the volatile, knife-wielding Tommy Crutchfield, who expanded his childhood alligator-and-snake business into a million-dollar empire of reptile hunting and dealing. Even the curators of the Bronx and San Diego zoos let their obsession with the animals lure them into deals in order to obtain illegally imported rare breeds. Smith's affection for these unsavory people gives the book an intriguing moral ambiguity (which might make some environmentalists cringe), but the subculture's brazen shenanigans make for a convoluted, fascinating tale. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

For fans of "The Orchid Thief" and tales of obsession, "Stolen World" tells the incredible story of the world's greatest reptile smugglers.

About the Author

JENNIE ERIN SMITH is a freelance science reporter and a frequent reviewer on

animals and natural history for the Times Literary Supplement. She is a recipient

of the Rona Jaffe Award for women writers, a fellowship at the Fine Arts Work

Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, two first-place awards from the American

Association of Sunday and Feature Editors, and the Waldo Proffitt Award for

environmental journalism.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307381477
Subtitle:
A Tale of Reptiles, Smugglers, and Skulduggery
Author:
Smith, Jennie Erin
Author:
Smith, Jennie
Publisher:
Crown
Subject:
Animals - General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Reptile trade - United States
Subject:
Wildlife smuggling - United States
Subject:
Animals
Subject:
Crime - True Crime
Subject:
Nature Studies-Reptiles and Amphibians
Publication Date:
20110104
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9.6 x 6.6 x 1.4 in 1.3188 lb

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Science
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Featured Titles
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Reptiles and Amphibians

Stolen World: A Tale of Reptiles, Smugglers, and Skulduggery Sale Hardcover
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$6.50 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Crown Publishing Group (NY) - English 9780307381477 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this very disturbing and very entertaining chronicle of reptile smugglers, the collectors and zoo keepers who trade with them, and the federal agents who try to catch them, the humans are as devious, dangerous, and creepily charming as the cold-blooded creatures they lust after. Science reporter Smith bases her book on extensive original interviews with two smugglers: Henry Molt Jr. is a reptile dealer who, in the 1960s, unable to get a job with a zoo, began a lifelong career of reptile collecting involving restless international travel, partner-stiffing, and jail time, with an undaunted enthusiasm that's survived into his 60s: 'The reptile business ‘is a disease,' he said, and you can't retire from a disease.' Equally outrageous is the volatile, knife-wielding Tommy Crutchfield, who expanded his childhood alligator-and-snake business into a million-dollar empire of reptile hunting and dealing. Even the curators of the Bronx and San Diego zoos let their obsession with the animals lure them into deals in order to obtain illegally imported rare breeds. Smith's affection for these unsavory people gives the book an intriguing moral ambiguity (which might make some environmentalists cringe), but the subculture's brazen shenanigans make for a convoluted, fascinating tale. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , For fans of "The Orchid Thief" and tales of obsession, "Stolen World" tells the incredible story of the world's greatest reptile smugglers.
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