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How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe

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How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe Cover

ISBN13: 9780307739452
ISBN10: 0307739457
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 2 left in stock at $10.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 Award winner Charles Yu delivers his debut novel, a razor-sharp, ridiculously funny, and utterly touching story of a son searching for his father...through quantum space–time.

Minor Universe 31 is a vast story-space on the outskirts of fiction, where paradox fluctuates like the stock market, lonely sexbots beckon failed protagonists, and time travel is serious business. Every day, people get into time machines and try to do the one thing they should never do: change the past. That's where Charles Yu, time travel technician — part counselor, part gadget repair man — steps in. He helps save people from themselves. Literally. When he's not taking client calls or consoling his boss, Phil, who could really use an upgrade, Yu visits his mother (stuck in a one-hour cycle of time, she makes dinner over and over and over) and searches for his father, who invented time travel and then vanished. Accompanied by TAMMY, an operating system with low self-esteem, and Ed, a nonexistent but ontologically valid dog, Yu sets out, and back, and beyond, in order to find the one day where he and his father can meet in memory. He learns that the key may be found in a book he got from his future self. It's called How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, and he's the author. And somewhere inside it is the information that could help him — in fact it may even save his life.

Wildly new and adventurous, Yu's debut is certain to send shock waves of wonder through literary space–time.

Review:

"Glittering layers of gorgeous and playful meta-science-fiction....Like [Douglas] Adams, Yu is very funny, usually proportional to the wildness of his inventions, but Yu's sound and fury conceal (and construct) this novel's dense, tragic, all-too-human heart....Yu is a superhero of rendering human consciousness and emotion in the language of engineering and science....A complex, brainy, genre-hopping joyride of a story, far more than the sum of its component parts, and smart and tragic enough to engage all regions of the brain and body." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Compulsively rereadable....Hilarious....Yu has a crisp, intermittently lyrical prose style, one that's comfortable with both math and sadness, moving seamlessly from delirious metafiction to the straight-faced prose of instruction-manual entries....[The book itself] is like Steve Jobs' ultimate hardware fetish, a dreamlike amalgam of functionality and predetermination." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"If How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe contented itself with exploring that classic chestnut of speculative fiction, the time paradox, it would likely make for an enjoyable sci-fi yarn. But Yu's novel is a good deal more ambitious, and ultimately more satisfying, than that. It's about time travel and cosmology, yes, but it's also about language and narrative — the more we learn about Minor Universe 31, the more it resembles the story space of the novel we're reading, which is full of diagrams, footnotes, pages left intentionally (and meaningfully) blank and brief chapters from the owner's manual of our narrator's time machine....Yu grafts the laws of theoretical physics onto the yearnings of the human heart so thoroughly and deftly that the book's technical language and mathematical proofs take on a sense of urgency." NPR

Review:

"How to Live Safely is a book likely to generate a lot of discussion, within science fiction and outside, infuriating some readers while delighting many others." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"A wild and inventive first novel...has been compared to the novels of Kurt Vonnegut Jr. and Jonathan Lethem, and the fact that such comparisons are not out of line says everything necessary about Yu's talent and future." Portland Oregonian

Review:

"Douglas Adams and Philip K. Dick are touchstones, but Yu's sense of humor and narrative splashes of color — especially when dealing with a pretty solitary life and the bittersweet search for his father, a time travel pioneer who disappeared — set him apart within the narrative spaces of his own horizontal design....A clever little story that will be looped in your head for days." Austin Chronicle

Synopsis:

From a 5 Under 35 winner, comes a razor-sharp, hilarious, and touching story of a son searching for his father . . . through quantum space-time.

 

Every day in Minor Universe 31 people get into time machines and try to change the past. That's where Charles Yu, time travel technician, steps in. He helps save people from themselves. Literally. When he's not taking client calls, Yu visits his mother and searches for his father, who invented time travel and then vanished. The key to locating his father may be found in a book. It's called How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, and somewhere inside it is information that will help him. It may even save his life.

About the Author

Charles Yu received the National Book Foundation's 5 Under 35 Award for his story collection Third Class Superhero, and he has also received the Sherwood Anderson Fiction Award. His work has been published in the Harvard Review, The Gettysburg Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Mississippi Review, and Mid-American Review, among other journals. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Michelle, and their two children.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 5 comments:

aliciacavitt, March 20, 2013 (view all comments by aliciacavitt)
Time travel in the classic science fiction style. Very thought-provoking and enjoyable read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
M.K. Hunter, September 13, 2011 (view all comments by M.K. Hunter)
This book will dazzle you with its constantly shifting perspectives, styles and left turns. Great fun. AND the author appears at Wordstock this October, so you'll able to find out for yourself what sort of mind can create such a crazy quilt of storytelling.
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(2 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
CWB, September 13, 2011 (view all comments by CWB)
As a fan of Jasper Fforde, I'm surprised the official reviewers didn't mention parallels with Fforde's series of novels about Thursday Next, a SpecOps detective traveling between the real world--or A real world--and the Book World, whose father is a member of the time-traveling ChronoGuard. I'll read Yu "next."
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 5 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307739452
Author:
Yu, Charles
Publisher:
Vintage Books
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Science Fiction and Fantasy-A to Z
Subject:
science fiction;fiction;time travel;sf;metafiction;novel;family;humor;fantasy;speculative fiction;american;literature;american literature
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Publication Date:
20110631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8 x 5.17 x 0.77 in 0.5625 lb

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Debut Fiction
Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » A to Z

How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.50 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Vintage Books - English 9780307739452 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Glittering layers of gorgeous and playful meta-science-fiction....Like [Douglas] Adams, Yu is very funny, usually proportional to the wildness of his inventions, but Yu's sound and fury conceal (and construct) this novel's dense, tragic, all-too-human heart....Yu is a superhero of rendering human consciousness and emotion in the language of engineering and science....A complex, brainy, genre-hopping joyride of a story, far more than the sum of its component parts, and smart and tragic enough to engage all regions of the brain and body."
"Review" by , "Compulsively rereadable....Hilarious....Yu has a crisp, intermittently lyrical prose style, one that's comfortable with both math and sadness, moving seamlessly from delirious metafiction to the straight-faced prose of instruction-manual entries....[The book itself] is like Steve Jobs' ultimate hardware fetish, a dreamlike amalgam of functionality and predetermination."
"Review" by , "If How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe contented itself with exploring that classic chestnut of speculative fiction, the time paradox, it would likely make for an enjoyable sci-fi yarn. But Yu's novel is a good deal more ambitious, and ultimately more satisfying, than that. It's about time travel and cosmology, yes, but it's also about language and narrative — the more we learn about Minor Universe 31, the more it resembles the story space of the novel we're reading, which is full of diagrams, footnotes, pages left intentionally (and meaningfully) blank and brief chapters from the owner's manual of our narrator's time machine....Yu grafts the laws of theoretical physics onto the yearnings of the human heart so thoroughly and deftly that the book's technical language and mathematical proofs take on a sense of urgency."
"Review" by , "How to Live Safely is a book likely to generate a lot of discussion, within science fiction and outside, infuriating some readers while delighting many others."
"Review" by , "A wild and inventive first novel...has been compared to the novels of Kurt Vonnegut Jr. and Jonathan Lethem, and the fact that such comparisons are not out of line says everything necessary about Yu's talent and future."
"Review" by , "Douglas Adams and Philip K. Dick are touchstones, but Yu's sense of humor and narrative splashes of color — especially when dealing with a pretty solitary life and the bittersweet search for his father, a time travel pioneer who disappeared — set him apart within the narrative spaces of his own horizontal design....A clever little story that will be looped in your head for days."
"Synopsis" by , From a 5 Under 35 winner, comes a razor-sharp, hilarious, and touching story of a son searching for his father . . . through quantum space-time.

 

Every day in Minor Universe 31 people get into time machines and try to change the past. That's where Charles Yu, time travel technician, steps in. He helps save people from themselves. Literally. When he's not taking client calls, Yu visits his mother and searches for his father, who invented time travel and then vanished. The key to locating his father may be found in a book. It's called How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, and somewhere inside it is information that will help him. It may even save his life.

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