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Forests of the Heart

by

Forests of the Heart Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the Old Country, they called them the Gentry: ancient spirits of the land, magical, amoral, and dangerous. When the Irish emigrated to North America, some of the Gentry followed...only to find that the New World already had spirits of its own, the manitou.

Now generations have passed, and the Irish have made homes in the new land, but the Gentry still wander homeless on the city streets. Gathering in the shadows, they bide their time and dream of power. As their dreams grow harder, darker, fiercer, so do the Gentry themselves — appearing, to those with the sight to see them, as hard and dangerous men, invariably dressed in black.

Bettina can see the Gentry, and knows them for what they are. Part Indian, part Mexican, she was raised by her grandmother to understand the spirit world. Now she lives in wintry Kellygnow, a massive old house run as an arts colony on the outskirts of Newford, a world away from the Southwestern desert of her youth. Outside her nighttime window, she often spies the dark man, squatting in the snow, smoking, brooding, waiting. She calls them los lobos, the wolves, and stays clear of them — until the night one follows her into the woods, and takes her hand...

Review:

"A leisurely, intriguing expedition into the spirit world, studded with Spanish and Gaelic words and an impressive depth of imagination, de Lint's latest teems with music, danger and a touch of romance." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Sometimes wordy, especially about musical trends, this is, nonetheless, a great yarn." Booklist

Review:

"Forests of the Heart is the kind of engaging, complex story filled with music, romance, humor, and high drama for which [de Lint] has become famous." Jonathan Strahan, Locus

Review:

"Forests of the Heart, with its vibrant characters and rich tapestry of mythology and spirituality, succeeds on many levels." Science Fiction Weekly

Review:

"De Lint is as engaging a stylist as Stephen King, but considerably more inventive and ambitious." Toronto Globe and Mail

Review:

"[T]his latest Newford tale from de Lint is an example of urban fantasy at its very best. Highly recommended." Library Journal

Review:

"[A] powerful, magical novel....The characters are well realized with subtle dimensions to their flaws and strengths." VOYA

Review:

"This is a nicely satisfying story in the typical de Lint fashion. Powerful imagery and blends of magic make it a successful fantasy." KLIATT

Review:

"Splendid ideas and an intriguing plot marred by self-indulgent flab and gab: disappointing after top-notch work (Someplace to be Flying, 1998) last time out." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

In the Old Country, they called them the Gentry: ancient spirits of the land, magical, amoral, and dangerous. When the Irish emigrated to North America, some of the Gentry followed...only to find that the New World already had spirits of its own, called manitou and other such names by the Native tribes.

Now generations have passed, and the Irish have made homes in the new land, but the Gentry still wander homeless on the city streets. Gathering in the city shadows, they bide their time and dream of power. As their dreams grow harder, darker, fiercer, so do the Gentry themselves--appearing, to those with the sight to see them, as hard and dangerous men, invariably dressed in black.

Bettina can see the Gentry, and knows them for what they are. Part Indian, part Mexican, she was raised by her grandmother to understand the spirit world. Now she lives in Kellygnow, a massive old house run as an arts colony on the outskirts of Newford, a world away from the Southwestern desert of her youth. Outsider her nighttime window, she often spies the dark men, squatting in the snow, smoking, brooding, waiting. She calls them los lobos, the wolves, and stays clear of them--until the night one follows her to the woods, and takes her hand....

Ellie, an independent young sculptor, is another with magic in her blood, but she refuses to believe it, even though she, too, sees the dark men. A strange old woman has summoned Ellie to Kellygnow to create a mask for her based on an ancient Celtic artifact. It is the mask of the mythic Summer King--another thing Ellie does not believe in. Yet lack of belief won't dim the power of the mast, or its dreadful intent.

Donal, Ellie's former lover, comes from an Irish family and knows the truth at the heart of the old myths. He thinks he can use the mask and the "hard men" for his own purposes. And Donal's sister, Miki, a punk accordion player, stands on the other side of the Gentry's battle with the Native spirits of the land. She knows that more than her brother's soul is at stake. All of Newford is threatened, human and mythic beings alike.

Once again Charles de Lint weaves the mythic traditions of many cultures into a seamless cloth, bringing folklore, music, and unforgettable characters to life on modern city streets.

About the Author

Charles de Lint and his wife, artist MaryAnn Harris, live in Ottawa, Ontario.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312875688
Author:
de Lint, Charles
Publisher:
St. Martins Press-3pl
Author:
Charles de Lint
Location:
New York
Subject:
Fantastic fiction
Subject:
Fantasy - General
Subject:
Fantasy fiction
Subject:
Fantasy - Contemporary
Subject:
Artist colonies
Subject:
Science Fiction and Fantasy-Fantasy
Subject:
magical realism
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st trade pbk. ed.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
August 2001
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
7.85 x 5.86 x 1.06 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » Fantasy » Contemporary
Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » Fantasy » General

Forests of the Heart Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.50 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Tor Books - English 9780312875688 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A leisurely, intriguing expedition into the spirit world, studded with Spanish and Gaelic words and an impressive depth of imagination, de Lint's latest teems with music, danger and a touch of romance."
"Review" by , "Sometimes wordy, especially about musical trends, this is, nonetheless, a great yarn."
"Review" by , "Forests of the Heart is the kind of engaging, complex story filled with music, romance, humor, and high drama for which [de Lint] has become famous."
"Review" by , "Forests of the Heart, with its vibrant characters and rich tapestry of mythology and spirituality, succeeds on many levels."
"Review" by , "De Lint is as engaging a stylist as Stephen King, but considerably more inventive and ambitious."
"Review" by , "[T]his latest Newford tale from de Lint is an example of urban fantasy at its very best. Highly recommended."
"Review" by , "[A] powerful, magical novel....The characters are well realized with subtle dimensions to their flaws and strengths."
"Review" by , "This is a nicely satisfying story in the typical de Lint fashion. Powerful imagery and blends of magic make it a successful fantasy."
"Review" by , "Splendid ideas and an intriguing plot marred by self-indulgent flab and gab: disappointing after top-notch work (Someplace to be Flying, 1998) last time out."
"Synopsis" by ,
In the Old Country, they called them the Gentry: ancient spirits of the land, magical, amoral, and dangerous. When the Irish emigrated to North America, some of the Gentry followed...only to find that the New World already had spirits of its own, called manitou and other such names by the Native tribes.

Now generations have passed, and the Irish have made homes in the new land, but the Gentry still wander homeless on the city streets. Gathering in the city shadows, they bide their time and dream of power. As their dreams grow harder, darker, fiercer, so do the Gentry themselves--appearing, to those with the sight to see them, as hard and dangerous men, invariably dressed in black.

Bettina can see the Gentry, and knows them for what they are. Part Indian, part Mexican, she was raised by her grandmother to understand the spirit world. Now she lives in Kellygnow, a massive old house run as an arts colony on the outskirts of Newford, a world away from the Southwestern desert of her youth. Outsider her nighttime window, she often spies the dark men, squatting in the snow, smoking, brooding, waiting. She calls them los lobos, the wolves, and stays clear of them--until the night one follows her to the woods, and takes her hand....

Ellie, an independent young sculptor, is another with magic in her blood, but she refuses to believe it, even though she, too, sees the dark men. A strange old woman has summoned Ellie to Kellygnow to create a mask for her based on an ancient Celtic artifact. It is the mask of the mythic Summer King--another thing Ellie does not believe in. Yet lack of belief won't dim the power of the mast, or its dreadful intent.

Donal, Ellie's former lover, comes from an Irish family and knows the truth at the heart of the old myths. He thinks he can use the mask and the "hard men" for his own purposes. And Donal's sister, Miki, a punk accordion player, stands on the other side of the Gentry's battle with the Native spirits of the land. She knows that more than her brother's soul is at stake. All of Newford is threatened, human and mythic beings alike.

Once again Charles de Lint weaves the mythic traditions of many cultures into a seamless cloth, bringing folklore, music, and unforgettable characters to life on modern city streets.

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