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The Shakespeare Riots: Revenge, Drama, and Death in Nineteenth-Century America

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The Shakespeare Riots: Revenge, Drama, and Death in Nineteenth-Century America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of the bloodiest incidents in New Yorks history, the so-called Astor Place Riot of May 10, 1849, was ignited by a long-simmering grudge match between the two leading Shakespearean actors of the age. Despite its unlikely origins, though, there was nothing remotely quaint about this pivotal moment in history-the unprecedented shooting by American soldiers of dozens of their fellow citizens, leading directly to the arming of American police forces.

The Shakespeare Riots recounts the story of this momentous night, its two larger-than-life protagonists, and the myriad political and cultural currents that fueled the violence. In an engrossing narrative that moves at a breakneck pace from the American frontier to the Mississippi River, to the posh theaters of London, to the hangouts of the most notorious street gangs of the day, Nigel Cliff weaves a spellbinding saga of soaring passions, huge egos, and venal corruption.

Cliff charts the course of this tragedy from its beginnings as a somewhat comical contretemps between Englishman William Charles Macready, the haughty lion of the London stage, and Edwin Forrest, the first great American star and a popular hero to millions. Equally celebrated, and equally self-centered, the two were once friends, then adversaries. Exploiting this rivalry, “nativist” agitators organized mobs of bullyboys to flex their muscle by striking a blow against the foppish Macready and the Old Worlds cultural hegemony that he represented.

The moment Macready took the stage in New York, his adversaries sprang into action, first by throwing insults, then rotten eggs, then chairs. When he dared show his face again, an estimated twenty thousand packed the streets around the theater. As cobblestones from outside rained down on the audience, National Guard troops were called in to quell the riot. Finding themselves outmatched, the Guardsmen discharged their weapons at the crowd, with horrific results. When the smoke cleared, as many as thirty people lay dead, with scores more wounded.

The Shakespeare Riots is social and cultural history of the highest order. In this wondrous saga Nigel Cliff immerses readers in the bustle of mid-nineteenth-century New York, re-creating the celebrity demimonde of the day and capturing all the high drama of a violent night that robbed a nation of its innocence.

Review:

"A dispute over Shakespeare resulted in a deadly riot on May 10, 1849, at New York City's Astor Place Theatre, where armed militiamen clashed with theatergoers, gangsters and bystanders. In the melee, some 50 soldiers and 50 civilians were wounded and more than 20 civilians killed. Cliff, a former theater and film critic for the London Times, sees the riot as symbolic of a young America trying to find its cultural voice and resentful of what some saw as British cultural imperialism. The fatal dispute was between two Shakespearean actors, the intellectual Englishman William Charles Macready and American working-class hero Edwin Forrest and began when Forrest hissed at Macready's performance of Hamlet in Edinburgh. This book ranges widely, from the 1809 riots at a Macbeth performance at London's Covent Garden to Shakespeare's popularity on the American frontier, where his plays helped pioneers wrestle with fundamental questions about human nature, and America's old and new money classes as immigrants flooded into the country. Nicely illustrated with contemporary photos and cartoons, Cliff's informative, engrossing if somewhat scattered debut recreates a time when the Bard inflamed passions in lower classes and gentry alike, and when America's theaters 'were a crossroads of a whole society.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"On the evening of May 10, 1849, a mob of more than 10,000 New Yorkers — some of them brandishing pistols and hurling rocks — faced off against city police outside the Astor Place Opera House. As the clash escalated, state militiamen opened fire on the crowd with muskets, leaving more than 20 people dead and dozens injured. The flashpoint of the riot, the bloodiest in American history to that point,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

A rich social and cultural history bases on the notorious Astor Place Riots in New York City in May 1849--the dramatic, tragicomic tale of how a petty feud between the two most celebrated Shakespearean actors of their day exploded into one of the deadliest disturbances in American history.

About the Author

Nigel Cliff was educated at Oxford University, where he was awarded a double First in English and the Beddington Prize for English literature. He is a former theater and film critic for the London Times and a contributor to The Economist. This is his first book.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345486943
Subtitle:
Revenge, Drama, and Death in Nineteenth-Century America
Author:
Cliff, Nigel
Publisher:
Random House
Subject:
History
Subject:
Theater
Subject:
Theater - History & Criticism
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Middle Atlantic
Subject:
Theater -- New York (State) -- New York.
Subject:
New York (N.Y.) Social life and customs.
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20070417
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
12 B/W ILLUSTRATIONS
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9.48x6.34x.95 in. 1.31 lbs.

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Shakespeare » Criticism
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Shakespeare Riots: Revenge, Drama, and Death in Nineteenth-Century America Used Hardcover
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Product details 336 pages Random House - English 9780345486943 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A dispute over Shakespeare resulted in a deadly riot on May 10, 1849, at New York City's Astor Place Theatre, where armed militiamen clashed with theatergoers, gangsters and bystanders. In the melee, some 50 soldiers and 50 civilians were wounded and more than 20 civilians killed. Cliff, a former theater and film critic for the London Times, sees the riot as symbolic of a young America trying to find its cultural voice and resentful of what some saw as British cultural imperialism. The fatal dispute was between two Shakespearean actors, the intellectual Englishman William Charles Macready and American working-class hero Edwin Forrest and began when Forrest hissed at Macready's performance of Hamlet in Edinburgh. This book ranges widely, from the 1809 riots at a Macbeth performance at London's Covent Garden to Shakespeare's popularity on the American frontier, where his plays helped pioneers wrestle with fundamental questions about human nature, and America's old and new money classes as immigrants flooded into the country. Nicely illustrated with contemporary photos and cartoons, Cliff's informative, engrossing if somewhat scattered debut recreates a time when the Bard inflamed passions in lower classes and gentry alike, and when America's theaters 'were a crossroads of a whole society.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , A rich social and cultural history bases on the notorious Astor Place Riots in New York City in May 1849--the dramatic, tragicomic tale of how a petty feud between the two most celebrated Shakespearean actors of their day exploded into one of the deadliest disturbances in American history.
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