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Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route

by

Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route Cover

ISBN13: 9780374270827
ISBN10: 0374270821
All Product Details

 

Review-A-Day

"[Hartman's] beautiful and insightful narrative reminds readers of previous calls for freedom in the work of Anna J. Cooper, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Dubois and Richard Wright, among others. Saidiya Hartman stands in good company, and propels their work masterfully into the 21st century." Anne C. Bailey, Ms. Magazine (read the entire Ms. Magazine review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman journeys along a slave route in Ghana, following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast. She retraces the history of the Atlantic slave trade from the fifteenth to the twentieth century and reckons with the blank slate of her own genealogy.

There were no survivors of Hartman's lineage, nor far-flung relatives in Ghana of whom she had come in search. She traveled to Ghana in search of strangers. The most universal definition of the slave is a stranger — torn from kin and country. To lose your mother is to suffer the loss of kin, to forget your past, and to inhabit the world as a stranger. As both the offspring of slaves and an American in Africa, Hartman, too, was a stranger. Her reflections on history and memory unfold as an intimate encounter with places — a holding cell, a slave market, a walled town built to repel slave raiders — and with people: an Akan prince who granted the Portuguese permission to build the first permanent trading fort in West Africa; an adolescent boy who was kidnapped while playing; a fourteen-year-old girl who was murdered aboard a slave ship.

Eloquent, thoughtful, and deeply affecting, Lose Your Mother is a powerful meditation on history, memory, and the Atlantic slave trade.

Review:

"In this rousing narrative, Berkeley professor Hartman traces first-hand the progress of her ancestors-forced migrants from the Gold Coast-in order to illuminate the history of the Atlantic slave trade. Chronicling her time in Ghana following the overland slave route from the hinterland to the Atlantic, Hartman admits early on to a naïve search for her identity: 'Secretly I wanted to belong somewhere or, at least, I wanted a convenient explanation of why I felt like a stranger.' Fortunately, Hartman eschews the simplification of such a quest, finding that Africa's American expatriates often find themselves more lost than when they started. Instead, Hartman channels her longing into facing tough questions, nagging self-doubt and the horrors of the Middle Passage in a fascinating, beautifully told history of those millions whose own histories were revoked in 'the process by which lives were destroyed and slaves born.' Shifting between past and present, Hartman also considers the 'afterlife of slavery,' revealing Africa-and, through her transitive experience, America-as yet unhealed by de-colonization and abolition, but showing signs of hope. Hartman's mix of history and memoir has the feel of a good novel, told with charm and passion, and should reach out to anyone contemplating the meaning of identity, belonging and homeland." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Hartman's surrender and suffering in the face of the memory of slavery and the slave trade — the horror of which can never be tallied — is noble and dignified." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"Hartman is hardly the first black American to go 'back' to Africa seeking a measure of personal and historical salvation. But she charts her heartbreak at not finding it with a meticulous honesty and mix of emotions...that feel distinctly 21st century." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"A provocative work, tinged with sadness and anger." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Hartman's strength is how she interweaves vivid scenes of the terror of the slave trade with her own internal struggle to confront the pain of slavery in her family's past." Library Journal

Review:

"This is a memoir about loss, alienation, and estrangement, but also, ultimately, about the power of art to remember. Lose Your Mother is a magnificent achievement." Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Harvard University

Synopsis:

Hartman journeys along a slave route in Ghana, retracing the history of the Atlantic slave trade from the 15th to the 20th century, and reckoning with the blank slate of her own genealogy.

Synopsis:

In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman journeys along a slave route in Ghana, following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast. She retraces the history of the Atlantic slave trade from the fifteenth to the twentieth century and reckons with the blank slate of her own genealogy.

There were no survivors of Hartman's lineage, nor far-flung relatives in Ghana of whom she had come in search. She traveled to Ghana in search of strangers. The most universal definition of the slave is a stranger--torn from kin and country. To lose your mother is to suffer the loss of kin, to forget your past, and to inhabit the world as a stranger. As both the offspring of slaves and an American in Africa, Hartman, too, was a stranger. Her reflections on history and memory unfold as an intimate encounter with places--a holding cell, a slave market, a walled town built

to repel slave raiders--and with people: an Akan prince who granted the Portuguese permission to build the first permanent trading fort in West Africa; an adolescent boy who was kidnapped while playing; a fourteen-year-old girl who was murdered aboard a slave ship.

Eloquent, thoughtful, and deeply affecting, Lose Your Mother is a powerful meditation on history, memory, and the Atlantic slave trade.

Synopsis:

In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman traces the history of the Atlantic slave trade by recounting a journey she took along a slave route in Ghana. Following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast, she reckons with the blank slate of her own genealogy and vividly dramatizes the effects of slavery on three centuries of African and African American history.

The slave, Hartman observes, is a stranger--torn from family, home, and country. To lose your mother is to be severed from your kin, to forget your past, and to inhabit the world as an outsider. There are no known survivors of Hartman's lineage, no relatives in Ghana whom she came hoping to find. She is a stranger in search of strangers, and this fact leads her into intimate engagements with the people she encounters along the way and with figures from the past whose lives were shattered and transformed by the slave trade. Written in prose that is fresh, insightful, and deeply affecting, Lose Your Mother is a "landmark text" (Robin D. G. Kelley, author of Freedom Dreams).

About the Author

Saidiya Hartman is the author of Scenes of Subjection. She teaches at the University of California in Berkeley. She lives in northern California.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

abena, July 8, 2007 (view all comments by abena)
HELLO ithink your book is very good so iwould like you to send me some of it.Ihope it help me vrry well.Iwould kindly like you to send me tothis addressDORSONS COMPLEX SCHOOL.P.O.BOX 8146 TEMA,GHANA ,WESTAFRICA Iam fifteen years of age
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780374270827
Subtitle:
A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Author:
Hartman, Saidiya
Subject:
Africa
Subject:
History
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Historic sites
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
Africa - General
Subject:
Travel
Subject:
Ghana Description and travel.
Subject:
Slave trade - Ghana - History
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
cultural heritage
Subject:
Personal Memoir
Subject:
S
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20080122
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 27 Black-and-White Illustration
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.42 x 6.3 x 1.17 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Africa » Ghana
History and Social Science » World History » Africa

Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 288 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374270827 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this rousing narrative, Berkeley professor Hartman traces first-hand the progress of her ancestors-forced migrants from the Gold Coast-in order to illuminate the history of the Atlantic slave trade. Chronicling her time in Ghana following the overland slave route from the hinterland to the Atlantic, Hartman admits early on to a naïve search for her identity: 'Secretly I wanted to belong somewhere or, at least, I wanted a convenient explanation of why I felt like a stranger.' Fortunately, Hartman eschews the simplification of such a quest, finding that Africa's American expatriates often find themselves more lost than when they started. Instead, Hartman channels her longing into facing tough questions, nagging self-doubt and the horrors of the Middle Passage in a fascinating, beautifully told history of those millions whose own histories were revoked in 'the process by which lives were destroyed and slaves born.' Shifting between past and present, Hartman also considers the 'afterlife of slavery,' revealing Africa-and, through her transitive experience, America-as yet unhealed by de-colonization and abolition, but showing signs of hope. Hartman's mix of history and memoir has the feel of a good novel, told with charm and passion, and should reach out to anyone contemplating the meaning of identity, belonging and homeland." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[Hartman's] beautiful and insightful narrative reminds readers of previous calls for freedom in the work of Anna J. Cooper, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Dubois and Richard Wright, among others. Saidiya Hartman stands in good company, and propels their work masterfully into the 21st century." (read the entire Ms. Magazine review)
"Review" by , "Hartman's surrender and suffering in the face of the memory of slavery and the slave trade — the horror of which can never be tallied — is noble and dignified."
"Review" by , "Hartman is hardly the first black American to go 'back' to Africa seeking a measure of personal and historical salvation. But she charts her heartbreak at not finding it with a meticulous honesty and mix of emotions...that feel distinctly 21st century."
"Review" by , "A provocative work, tinged with sadness and anger."
"Review" by , "Hartman's strength is how she interweaves vivid scenes of the terror of the slave trade with her own internal struggle to confront the pain of slavery in her family's past."
"Review" by , "This is a memoir about loss, alienation, and estrangement, but also, ultimately, about the power of art to remember. Lose Your Mother is a magnificent achievement."
"Synopsis" by , Hartman journeys along a slave route in Ghana, retracing the history of the Atlantic slave trade from the 15th to the 20th century, and reckoning with the blank slate of her own genealogy.
"Synopsis" by ,
In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman journeys along a slave route in Ghana, following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast. She retraces the history of the Atlantic slave trade from the fifteenth to the twentieth century and reckons with the blank slate of her own genealogy.

There were no survivors of Hartman's lineage, nor far-flung relatives in Ghana of whom she had come in search. She traveled to Ghana in search of strangers. The most universal definition of the slave is a stranger--torn from kin and country. To lose your mother is to suffer the loss of kin, to forget your past, and to inhabit the world as a stranger. As both the offspring of slaves and an American in Africa, Hartman, too, was a stranger. Her reflections on history and memory unfold as an intimate encounter with places--a holding cell, a slave market, a walled town built

to repel slave raiders--and with people: an Akan prince who granted the Portuguese permission to build the first permanent trading fort in West Africa; an adolescent boy who was kidnapped while playing; a fourteen-year-old girl who was murdered aboard a slave ship.

Eloquent, thoughtful, and deeply affecting, Lose Your Mother is a powerful meditation on history, memory, and the Atlantic slave trade.

"Synopsis" by ,
In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman traces the history of the Atlantic slave trade by recounting a journey she took along a slave route in Ghana. Following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast, she reckons with the blank slate of her own genealogy and vividly dramatizes the effects of slavery on three centuries of African and African American history.

The slave, Hartman observes, is a stranger--torn from family, home, and country. To lose your mother is to be severed from your kin, to forget your past, and to inhabit the world as an outsider. There are no known survivors of Hartman's lineage, no relatives in Ghana whom she came hoping to find. She is a stranger in search of strangers, and this fact leads her into intimate engagements with the people she encounters along the way and with figures from the past whose lives were shattered and transformed by the slave trade. Written in prose that is fresh, insightful, and deeply affecting, Lose Your Mother is a "landmark text" (Robin D. G. Kelley, author of Freedom Dreams).

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