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This title in other editions

House of Leaves: A Novel

by

House of Leaves: A Novel Cover

ISBN13: 9780375703768
ISBN10: 0375703764
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Staff Pick

"Saints be praised, this is the best book of the new millennium. A veritable tour de force. Pynchon meets Stephen King meets Robert Hughes meets Borges meets Dante. Joycian. Jungian. Mythic. Any clich used by fawning literary critics applies. Yadda Yadda Yadda. Impossible to put down. Impossible to believe it's his first book. I spent several hours trying to figure out if Danielewski was an anagram, which is a fraction of the time I spent deciphering the many anagrams, puzzles, hidden meanings and symbols which make this book so rich. It's an allegory/horror story/love story/philosophical soft porn/psychological thriller. It scared the crap out of me. It made me cry. It filled me with joyous rapture. I stopped eating, sleeping, working, (please ignore that boss) just to finish it. Then I started it again and it's better the second time. Hurrumph. Yammer. Gawk. OK I'm back. It's a book about a guy who finds a manuscript about a film about a family who have moved into a house that is smaller on the outside than it is on the inside. If I told you any more I'd have to kill you (or maybe you'd have to kill me.) I've already said too much."
Recommended by John, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Years ago, when House of Leaves was first being passed around, it was nothing more than a badly bundled heap of paper, parts of which would occasionally surface on the Internet. No one could have anticipated the small but devoted following this terrifying story would soon command. Starting with an odd assortment of marginalized youth — musicians, tattoo artists, programmers, strippers, environmentalists, and adrenaline junkies — the book eventually made its way into the hands of older generations, who not only found themselves in those strangely arranged pages but also discovered a way back into the lives of their estranged children.

Now, for the first time, this astonishing novel is made available in book form, complete with the original colored words, vertical footnotes, and newly added second and third appendices.

The story remains unchanged, focusing on a young family that moves into a small home on Ash Tree Lane where they discover something is terribly wrong: their house is bigger on the inside than it is on the outside.

Of course, neither Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Will Navidson nor his companion Karen Green was prepared to face the consequences of that impossibility, until the day their two little children wandered off and their voices eerily began to return another story — of creature darkness, of an ever-growing abyss behind a closet door, and of that unholy growl which soon enough would tear through their walls and consume all their dreams.

Review:

"An amazingly intricate and ambitious first novel...that puts an engrossing new spin on the traditional haunted house tale....One of the most impressive excursions into the supernatural in many a year." Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

Review:

"[A] wonderful first novel....[F]unny, moving, sexy, beautifully told, an elaborate engagement with the shape and meaning of narrative." Robert Kelly, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Danielewski's eccentric and sometimes brilliant debut novel is really two novels....One — the horror story — is a tour-de-force....[T]he novel is a surreal palimpsest of terror and erudition, surely destined for cult status." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"This stunning first effort is destined for fast-track cult status....This work is a kaleidoscopically layered and deconstructed H. P. Lovecraft-style horror story. It hums and resonates with wonder, dread, and insight." Eric Robbins, Booklist

Review:

"Danielewski employs avant-garde page layouts that are occasionally a bit too clever but are generally highly effective....It is simultaneously a highly literary work and an absolute hoot....[P]owerful and extremely original..." Library Journal

Review:

"This demonically brilliant book is impossible to ignore, put down, or persuasively conclude reading. In fact, when you purchase your copy you may reach a certain page and find me there, reduced in size like Vincent Price in The Fly, still trapped in the web of its malicious, beautiful pages." Jonathan Lethem, author of Motherless Brooklyn

Review:

"House of Leaves actually gave me nightmares: I had to stop reading it before bedtime. I'm sure klaxons will be set blaring around it and klieg lights will be trained on it, and so they should. Its secrets are rich and obscure. Danielewski's textured novel is about apprehensions, in all senses of the word: to anticipate with dread, to seize, to understand. If you can imagine that Peter Pan's enemy is not Captain Hook but Neverland itself, or that the whale that swallows Jonah is Moby-Dick, you'll begin to appreciate what this book is about. Anticipate it with dread, seize, and understand. A riveting reading experience." Gregory Maguire, author of Lost and Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West

Review:

"A great novel. A phenomenal debut. Thrillingly alive, sublimely creepy, distressingly scary, breathtakingly intelligent — it renders most other fiction meaningless. One can imagine Thomas Pynchon, J. G. Ballard, Stephen King, and David Foster Wallace bowing at Danielewski's feet, choking with astonishment, surprise, laughter, awe." Bret Easton Ellis

Synopsis:

A family relocates to a small house on Ash Tree Lane and discovers that the inside of their new home seems to be without boundaries.

About the Author

Mark Z. Danielewski was born in 1966. House of Leaves is his first novel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 18 comments:

WongKaiWen, December 22, 2012 (view all comments by WongKaiWen)
This is without a doubt one of the most engrossing books I've ever read in my life. I'm almost embarrassed to admit the amount of notes I've scrawled in various notebooks while reading it. You can call this book a horror story, but you can also call it a love story. You might call it the reinvention of the novel, or at the very least it's a book that makes you question your ideas about what a novel could or should be. About where the line is between fact and fiction, author and creation, about investing ourselves in a story we know isn't real. But more than all the surface elements I talked about, this book is an exploration of the human psyche, about characters who are dealing with issues of identity, sorrow, loss, regret, obsession. And those things more than anything about this book is why months after reading it I'll get random flashes from the book and an irresistible urge to pick it up. It haunts you, but in a way that makes you want more. Read it. If only just for novelty of the reading experience. As an added bonus, those readers who are truly obsessive will undoubtedly realize how much more is going on in this book and spend many a sleepless night trying to solve a riddle with no answer and reach the end of a path only to realize they've been walking in a circle.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Douglas Kent, August 4, 2012 (view all comments by Douglas Kent)
Mark Danielewski weaves a trio of stoies in and out of each other, each one magical and engrossing in its own way. The narrator, who speaks mainly through footnotes, explains how he came upon the papers which he assembled into the book. Then there is the author, a deceased man who is reviewing film footage he could never have seen, and which may not exist. And then the story contained in the footage itself. Insanity and sanity, real and imagined, paranoia-based and supernatural twist like strands of DNA within this true work of art.

For added enjoyment, pick up the CD "Haunted" by Poe (Mark Danielewski's sister) which in its own way is a musical attachment to HOUSE of Leaves (HOUSE should always be capitalized when referring to this book). They were released at about the same time, and on one track (the "Hey, Baby" remix) Mark reads a portion of the book over the music.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)
W S Krauss, October 10, 2011 (view all comments by W S Krauss)
A book within a book about a film about a house. The house, by the way, is larger on the inside than it is on the outside. The book was found by a guy named Johnny Truant, who found the notes for the book within the book, and who wrote the footnotes for the book within the book. These footnotes take up roughly half of the book, and his story is of equal importance to the story of the family who lived in the house. The man who wrote the notes for the book within the book, Zampano, is also an important figure. The house is an important character in the lives of all- the family who lived in the house and the man (Navidson) in the family who made the film, the man Zampano who wrote the notes for the book within the book and Johnny, who found the notes and arranged them into a book and wrote the footnotes for the book within a book. It sounds complicated, but it all makes sinister and dizzying sense. House of Leaves is a "novel" novel, a wonderfully complex, form-bending, experimental book within a book about a film about a house. With footnotes, appendices, photo collages and an index. Read this book and you'll be hooked.
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(3 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 18 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375703768
Subtitle:
A Novel
Author:
Danielewski, Mark Z.
Introduction by:
Truant, Johnny
Introduction:
Truant, Johnny
Publisher:
Pantheon Books
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Poetry (poetic works by one author)
Subject:
Horror
Subject:
Horror fiction
Subject:
Horror tales
Subject:
Experimental fiction
Subject:
Horror - General
Copyright:
Edition Number:
2
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
March 7, 2000
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
736
Dimensions:
9.17 x 7 x 1.39 in 2.5 lb

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House of Leaves: A Novel Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.50 In Stock
Product details 736 pages Pantheon Books - English 9780375703768 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

"Saints be praised, this is the best book of the new millennium. A veritable tour de force. Pynchon meets Stephen King meets Robert Hughes meets Borges meets Dante. Joycian. Jungian. Mythic. Any clich used by fawning literary critics applies. Yadda Yadda Yadda. Impossible to put down. Impossible to believe it's his first book. I spent several hours trying to figure out if Danielewski was an anagram, which is a fraction of the time I spent deciphering the many anagrams, puzzles, hidden meanings and symbols which make this book so rich. It's an allegory/horror story/love story/philosophical soft porn/psychological thriller. It scared the crap out of me. It made me cry. It filled me with joyous rapture. I stopped eating, sleeping, working, (please ignore that boss) just to finish it. Then I started it again and it's better the second time. Hurrumph. Yammer. Gawk. OK I'm back. It's a book about a guy who finds a manuscript about a film about a family who have moved into a house that is smaller on the outside than it is on the inside. If I told you any more I'd have to kill you (or maybe you'd have to kill me.) I've already said too much."

"Review" by , "An amazingly intricate and ambitious first novel...that puts an engrossing new spin on the traditional haunted house tale....One of the most impressive excursions into the supernatural in many a year."
"Review" by , "[A] wonderful first novel....[F]unny, moving, sexy, beautifully told, an elaborate engagement with the shape and meaning of narrative."
"Review" by , "Danielewski's eccentric and sometimes brilliant debut novel is really two novels....One — the horror story — is a tour-de-force....[T]he novel is a surreal palimpsest of terror and erudition, surely destined for cult status."
"Review" by , "This stunning first effort is destined for fast-track cult status....This work is a kaleidoscopically layered and deconstructed H. P. Lovecraft-style horror story. It hums and resonates with wonder, dread, and insight."
"Review" by , "Danielewski employs avant-garde page layouts that are occasionally a bit too clever but are generally highly effective....It is simultaneously a highly literary work and an absolute hoot....[P]owerful and extremely original..."
"Review" by , "This demonically brilliant book is impossible to ignore, put down, or persuasively conclude reading. In fact, when you purchase your copy you may reach a certain page and find me there, reduced in size like Vincent Price in The Fly, still trapped in the web of its malicious, beautiful pages."
"Review" by , "House of Leaves actually gave me nightmares: I had to stop reading it before bedtime. I'm sure klaxons will be set blaring around it and klieg lights will be trained on it, and so they should. Its secrets are rich and obscure. Danielewski's textured novel is about apprehensions, in all senses of the word: to anticipate with dread, to seize, to understand. If you can imagine that Peter Pan's enemy is not Captain Hook but Neverland itself, or that the whale that swallows Jonah is Moby-Dick, you'll begin to appreciate what this book is about. Anticipate it with dread, seize, and understand. A riveting reading experience."
"Review" by , "A great novel. A phenomenal debut. Thrillingly alive, sublimely creepy, distressingly scary, breathtakingly intelligent — it renders most other fiction meaningless. One can imagine Thomas Pynchon, J. G. Ballard, Stephen King, and David Foster Wallace bowing at Danielewski's feet, choking with astonishment, surprise, laughter, awe."
"Synopsis" by , A family relocates to a small house on Ash Tree Lane and discovers that the inside of their new home seems to be without boundaries.
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