Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | April 8, 2014

Shawn Donley: IMG Gabrielle Zevin: The Powells.com Interview



Gabrielle ZevinThe American Booksellers Association collects nominations from bookstores all over the country for favorite forthcoming titles. The Storied Life of... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry

    Gabrielle Zevin 9781616203214

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
List price: $14.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
7 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

The Tie That Binds

by

The Tie That Binds Cover

ISBN13: 9780375724381
ISBN10: 0375724389
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Colorado, January 1977. Eighty-year-old Edith Goodnough lies in a hospital bed, IV taped to the back of her hand, police officer at her door. She is charged with murder. The clues: a sack of chicken feed slit with a knife, a milky-eyed dog tied outdoors one cold afternoon. The motives: the brutal business of farming and a family code of ethics as unforgiving as the winter prairie itself.

In his critically acclaimed first novel, Kent Haruf delivers the sweeping tale of a woman of the American High Plains, as told by her neighbor, Sanders Roscoe. As Roscoe shares what he knows, Edith's tragedies unfold: a childhood of pre-dawn chores, a mother's death, a violence that leaves a father dependent on his children, forever enraged. Here is the story of a woman who sacrifices her happiness in the name of family — and then, in one gesture, reclaims her freedom. Breathtaking, determinedly truthful, The Tie That Binds is a powerfully eloquent tribute to the arduous demands of rural America, and of the tenacity of the human spirit.

Review:

"With Edith as the center, a way of life is vividly described: the never-ending farm chores (which include a terrible accident you'll want to read with your eyes shut), Main Street on a Saturday afternoon, the porch swing, a fair, births, deaths — and always the land. Edith's bleak existence may consist mostly of 'a lifetime of staying home'; it is nonetheless eventful. Kent Haruf writes so wonderfully that even if it seems he has created a woman too level-headed not to have figured out a way to move that half mile down the road, this flaw doesn't matter. His characters live, and the voice of his narrator reverberates after the last page: humorous, ironic, loving." Ruth Doan MacDougall, The Christian Science Monitor

Review:

"Edith's story is a good one told well....The creation of Sanders Roscoe is a risky narrative tactic. A few of the narrator's natural digressions slow the novel's pace and might have been deleted, though anyone entertaining idyllic notions about what it is to milk a cow in the dead of winter ought to pay careful attention to Sanders Roscoe's thoughts on the matter. A second, greater risk taken by Mr. Haruf is that, clearly, Sanders Roscoe cannot be present at every crucial moment in Edith Goodnough's life. Consequently, he must often surmise what he cannot know. But the suppleness and power of Mr. Haruf's writing take us swiftly past such moments." Perry Glasser, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"An impressive, expertly crafted work of sensitivity and detail....Powerful." Los Angeles Times Book Review

Review:

"[A] fine first novel that dramatically and accurately explores the lives of people who work the land in the stark American Middle West." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Kent Haruf writes so wonderfully....His characters live, and the voice of his narrator reverberates after the last page: humorous, ironic, loving." The Christian Science Monitor

Review:

"Haruf's gifts as a writer go beyond choreography. He has caught his prairie people with the skill of Wright Morris, the prairie itself with the sweeping eye of Willa Cather....[I]t's nearly impossible to believe this is his first novel." Rocky Mountain News

About the Author

Kent Haruf’s honors include a Whiting Foundation Award, a Stegner Award, a Frank Waters Award, and a special citation from the PEN/Hemingway Foundation. His novel Plainsong won the Mountains & Plains Booksellers Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the New Yorker Book Award. He lives with his wife, Cathy, in his native Colorado.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Sheila Deeth, March 27, 2013 (view all comments by Sheila Deeth)
Set in the plains of Colorado from the early 1900s to 1977, Kent Haruf’s The Tie that Binds is a beautiful story of real life, real people, and real meaning imparted by genuine relationships. Sanders Roscoe drives a Denver newspaper reporter away from his door in fury, but he welcomes the reader into his home where he tells an enthralling story of life on the American Plains�"in particular, he tells of a woman called Edith who lies in hospital bed, charged unexpectedly with murder.
Sandy’s father knew Edith’s family when they first arrived in the plains. His Indian grandmother helped deliver Edith when she was born, and there’s a wonderful sense of history to the depiction of Indian lands brought under the plough and tamed. Edith’s father despises the half-caste neighbor boy, but years of working the same tracts of land tie families and lives together, even while a sense of duty threatens those precious ties.
Daughter of a cruelly unthinking man, sister of an oddly unthinking brother, and childless neighbor who loves children, Edith is dry and sandy as the soil, unyielding as the plough, and solidly determined as the trees that break the ever-blowing wind. Heroes are wounded people rising above their losses, forgiving each other, trusting, and building ties as land and nature bind them. As Sanders tells Edith's tale it soon becomes clear both he and she, for all their imperfections, are heroes of a kind.
Wonderfully evocative, unflinchingly honest, with self-deprecating humor and truly redeeming affection, The Tie that Binds binds the reader to these characters and the land, leaving a feeling that we’ve really been there, known these people, and really care what might happen in the end.

Disclosure: A generous friend loaned me this book.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Jeane, April 2, 2008 (view all comments by Jeane)
Holt, Colorado is the setting of this dismal tale about a dysfunctional family of farmers. When the original homesteaders fail to make the farm thrive, their children inherit a bleak harsh life. The daughter Edith ends up taking on the brunt of responsibility, fulfilling her duty to her family, as unthankful as that was. In spite of the fact that I did not find the characters very likeable with their disagreeable dispositions and painful relationships, their faults make them very human and realistic. There was something admirable about their stoic nature in the face of challenges and bitter disappointments. I came away from the book uncertain if I should condemn or could possible condole Edith's final actions that sealed the tragedy of this story.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
csmith1, July 14, 2007 (view all comments by csmith1)
The first page is hard to understand, because it starts off talking about a woman who has just been arrested for something. The rast of the book is great!!!!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(0 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375724381
Author:
Haruf, Kent
Publisher:
Vintage Books USA
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Frontier and pioneer life
Subject:
Colorado
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Aged women
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Older women
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage Contemporaries
Series Volume:
3161
Publication Date:
20000331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8 x 5.15 x .65 in .6 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Here to Stay Used Trade Paper $4.95
  2. New Essays on Uncle Tom's Cabin... New Trade Paper $42.50
  3. Dream at the End of the World: Paul... Used Trade Paper $3.95
  4. The book of evidence Used Trade Paper $3.95
  5. Realms of Gold Used Mass Market $5.95
  6. Closing Arguments Used Trade Paper $1.50

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » American Studies » Popular Culture

The Tie That Binds Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780375724381 Reviews:
"Review" by , "With Edith as the center, a way of life is vividly described: the never-ending farm chores (which include a terrible accident you'll want to read with your eyes shut), Main Street on a Saturday afternoon, the porch swing, a fair, births, deaths — and always the land. Edith's bleak existence may consist mostly of 'a lifetime of staying home'; it is nonetheless eventful. Kent Haruf writes so wonderfully that even if it seems he has created a woman too level-headed not to have figured out a way to move that half mile down the road, this flaw doesn't matter. His characters live, and the voice of his narrator reverberates after the last page: humorous, ironic, loving."
"Review" by , "Edith's story is a good one told well....The creation of Sanders Roscoe is a risky narrative tactic. A few of the narrator's natural digressions slow the novel's pace and might have been deleted, though anyone entertaining idyllic notions about what it is to milk a cow in the dead of winter ought to pay careful attention to Sanders Roscoe's thoughts on the matter. A second, greater risk taken by Mr. Haruf is that, clearly, Sanders Roscoe cannot be present at every crucial moment in Edith Goodnough's life. Consequently, he must often surmise what he cannot know. But the suppleness and power of Mr. Haruf's writing take us swiftly past such moments."
"Review" by , "An impressive, expertly crafted work of sensitivity and detail....Powerful."
"Review" by , "[A] fine first novel that dramatically and accurately explores the lives of people who work the land in the stark American Middle West."
"Review" by , "Kent Haruf writes so wonderfully....His characters live, and the voice of his narrator reverberates after the last page: humorous, ironic, loving."
"Review" by , "Haruf's gifts as a writer go beyond choreography. He has caught his prairie people with the skill of Wright Morris, the prairie itself with the sweeping eye of Willa Cather....[I]t's nearly impossible to believe this is his first novel."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.