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1 Beaverton Music- Rock Biography

Dream Brother: The Lives and Music of Jeff and Tim Buckley

by

Dream Brother: The Lives and Music of Jeff and Tim Buckley Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter One

"My grandfather had a beautiful voice. Irish tenor. Beautiful. Too much of a military hardass to deal with his own and his son's talents. I wish it were otherwise. I love you, you poor bastards.... With a father like this man, it is no wonder that Tim Buckley was afraid to come back to me. So afraid to be my father. Because his only paradigm for fatherhood was a deranged lunatic with a steel plate in his head.... I know that he must have been scared shitless to think he might possibly become like his father. Scared shitless of treating me the way his father treated him and his family. Can you imagine the heartbreak? The useless, shitty torture day in, day out?

"-- JEFF BUCKLEY, JOURNAL ENTRY, AUGUST 9, 1995

As centuries went, the eighteenth was not a particularly desirable one in which to be Irish in Ireland. The island was on its way to becoming absorbed into the United Kingdom, and the British Penal Laws drawn up between 1702 and 1719 had planted the seeds for the muzzling of native Irish culture. One law in particular made it illegal for the Irish to study and practice their own language, Gaelic, and their own traditions within their own borders. For the Irish people, the Laws were demoralizing and degrading, and they led the populace to devise increasingly covert ways to school their children in, among others, Gaelic. Illicit instructors began teaching in whatever ramshackle structures could be found- in old barns and ditches, behind the ruins of walls, even behind hedges that would hide both teacher and pupils. The latter practice gave rise to the term "hedgemaster," which came to apply to any and all of these illegal practitioners of Irish tradition.

Among thehedgemasters was at least one member of the Buckley clan, said to be from county Cork in the southwestern part of the country. According to family lore, the Buckleys were already known around Cork's sloping, green-blanketed valleys for their skills as storytellers and troubadours. As hedgemasters, they now added authority defiers to their reputation. Along with their fellow educational rebels, they consciously spat on the law of the land in order to carry on the dying and suppressed culture of their own people. The hedgemasters- and the Buckleys- would do things their way.

Among their own dubious achievements, the British Penal Laws also forced thousands of Irish to flee Ireland and settle elsewhere, and some landed in the industrial towns of upstate New York. By the early twentieth century, a descendant of one of the hedgemasters- the first Timothy Charles Buckley- and his wife, Charlotte, were living and working in one of those areas: Amsterdam, a factory town twenty miles northwest of Albany. The Mohawk River sliced through the small city, but that feature was far from its most notable. Sixty-two plants clogged the streets of Amsterdam, which was populated primarily by working-class Irish, Polish, Germans, Russians, and Italians. In the proud words of its chamber of commerce, Amsterdam was "first in the manufacture of brooms" in the nation; its factories also churned out rugs, carpets, underwear, gloves, and pearl buttons, among dozens of other everyday products. (It was also the producer of actor Kirk Douglas, born there as Issur Danielovich in 1916.) Tim Buckley had an auto repair service in town with his partner, Frank Graff, but Buckley & Graff did not last long, and by 1936,Tim senior was a full-time bartender and dwelled with his family on Mechanic Street near the Chuctanunda Creek. The Mechanic Street address was merely one of many; every year, the family would relocate to a new home.

The Buckleys' initial attempt at a family failed when their first child died shortly after birth. In November 1916, eighteen-year-old Charlotte finally bore a healthy child, a son named Timothy Charles Jr. Tim Jr. graduated high school and, by age twenty, was working in the local movie theater, the Strand, on the city's bustling, fume-choked East Main Street, near the Sears Roebuck and Penney's stores. In 1939, he took a job at the Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Company ("America's style leader for over 100 years," boasted its advertisements). However, World War II altered whatever plans Tim Jr. had for his life. He had already enlisted in the National Guard in December 1937, and was placed on active duty on October 15, 1940. Then, on May 25,1942, he was drafted and assigned to the 101st Airborne. He was twenty-five.

Even under the circumstances, it was a daunting assignment. The newly activated 101st trained and prepared soldiers for an innovative form of postindustrial warfare, parachute combat; their unofficial name, the Screaming Eagles, testified to the ferocity and intensity of their mission. Tim spent four weeks in parachute school at Fort Benning in Georgia before he and his fellow dogfaces shipped out for the European theater of operations on September 5, 1943, eventually participating in campaigns at Normandy, Ardennes, northern France, and the Rhineland. Tim's outfit was originally part of companies B and D of the 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment- a quarter to afifth of whom were killed in action. Tim was later transferred to ground duty as part of the 105th Infantry, Company G. In the 502nd, his official title was sergeant, but his unofficial moniker was a "demolition specialist," who, in the Army's words, "destroyed by means of explosives, such objects of military importance as bridges, roads, buildings, and railways to delay enemy action."

As with many of his fellow soldiers, Tim arrived back in America only after the war ended-on Christmas day 1945, first to Fort Dix, New Jersey, and then to Washington, DC. Judging by the slew of medals he brought back with him, including a Distinguished Unit Badge, a Bronze Star, and a Good Conduct Medal, Tim seemed a solid, honorable soldier.

Synopsis:

When Jeff Buckley drowned at the age of thirty in 1997, he not only left behind a legacy of brilliant music — he brought back haunting memories of his father, '60s troubadour Tim Buckley, a gifted musician who barely knew his son and who himself died at twenty-eight. Both father and son made transcendent music that mixed rock, jazz, and folk; both amassed a cadre of obsessive, adoring fans.

This absorbing dual biography — based on interviews with more than one hundred friends, family members, and business associates as well as access to journals and unreleased recordings — tells for the first time the intriguing, often heartbreaking story of these two musicians. It offers a new understanding of the Buckleys' parallel lives — and tragedies — while exploring the changing music business between the '60s and the '90s. Finally, it tells the story of a father and son, two complex, enigmatic men who died searching for themselves and each other.

Synopsis:

When Jeff Buckley drowned at the age of thirty in 1997, he not only left behind a legacy of brilliant music — he brought back haunting memories of his father, '60s troubadour Tim Buckley, a gifted musician who barely knew his son and who himself died at twenty-eight. Both father and son made transcendent music that mixed rock, jazz, and folk; both amassed a cadre of obsessive, adoring fans.

This absorbing dual biography — based on interviews with more than one hundred friends, family members, and business associates as well as access to journals and unreleased recordings — tells for the first time the intriguing, often heartbreaking story of these two musicians. It offers a new understanding of the Buckleys' parallel lives — and tragedies — while exploring the changing music business between the '60s and the '90s. Finally, it tells the story of a father and son, two complex, enigmatic men who died searching for themselves and each other.

About the Author

David Browne is the music critic for Entertainment Weekly and a former reporter for the New York Daily News. His articles on music and popular culture have appeared in Rolling Stone, the New York Times, Mojo, and other publications. A graduate of New York University's journalism program, be is the recipient of a 1996 Music Journalism Award for criticism. He lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780380806249
Author:
Browne, David
Publisher:
HarperEntertainment
Author:
Browne
Author:
David
Location:
New York, NY
Subject:
General
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Composers & Musicians - Rock
Subject:
Rock
Subject:
Singers
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Rock
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Biography-Composers and Musicians
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st paperback ed.
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Series Volume:
107-1
Publication Date:
20020131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
8.00x5.28x.94 in. .65 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » General
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock » Biographies
Biography » Composers and Musicians
Biography » General

Dream Brother: The Lives and Music of Jeff and Tim Buckley Used Trade Paper
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$7.95 In Stock
Product details 400 pages HarperEntertainment - English 9780380806249 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , When Jeff Buckley drowned at the age of thirty in 1997, he not only left behind a legacy of brilliant music — he brought back haunting memories of his father, '60s troubadour Tim Buckley, a gifted musician who barely knew his son and who himself died at twenty-eight. Both father and son made transcendent music that mixed rock, jazz, and folk; both amassed a cadre of obsessive, adoring fans.

This absorbing dual biography — based on interviews with more than one hundred friends, family members, and business associates as well as access to journals and unreleased recordings — tells for the first time the intriguing, often heartbreaking story of these two musicians. It offers a new understanding of the Buckleys' parallel lives — and tragedies — while exploring the changing music business between the '60s and the '90s. Finally, it tells the story of a father and son, two complex, enigmatic men who died searching for themselves and each other.

"Synopsis" by , When Jeff Buckley drowned at the age of thirty in 1997, he not only left behind a legacy of brilliant music — he brought back haunting memories of his father, '60s troubadour Tim Buckley, a gifted musician who barely knew his son and who himself died at twenty-eight. Both father and son made transcendent music that mixed rock, jazz, and folk; both amassed a cadre of obsessive, adoring fans.

This absorbing dual biography — based on interviews with more than one hundred friends, family members, and business associates as well as access to journals and unreleased recordings — tells for the first time the intriguing, often heartbreaking story of these two musicians. It offers a new understanding of the Buckleys' parallel lives — and tragedies — while exploring the changing music business between the '60s and the '90s. Finally, it tells the story of a father and son, two complex, enigmatic men who died searching for themselves and each other.

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