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Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light

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Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light Cover

ISBN13: 9780385520379
ISBN10: 0385520379
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Revealing the inner spiritual life of one of the most beloved and important religious figures in history, this collection of her writing and reflections sheds light on Mother Teresas interior life in a way that reveals the depth and intensity of her holiness for the first time.

Synopsis:

The legendary Mother Teresa's work for--and among--the poor has become the yardstick by which the entire world measures compassion, generosity, and selflessness. Her words and actions have inspired millions of people from every race and religion and country to help the poor and needy, a legacy that is her gift to all mankind for generations to come.

From 1950, when she founded the order of Missionaries of Charity, to winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979, and then, in 1985, being awarded the Medal of Freedom--the United States' highest civilian award--to her final days, Mother Teresa served the world as a beacon shedding the light of hope, comfort, and peace on all.

"Mother Teresa: In My Own Words" is a timeless testament to the power of her words. Here are the same quotes, stories, and prayers that helped strengthen and inspire the poor, the dying, the suffering, and the doubting who she met during her lifetime, and that will continue to strengthen and inspire all who read them.

About the Author

Born in Skopje in 1910, MOTHER TERESA joined the Sisters of Loreto in Dublin in 1928 and was sent to India, where she began her novitiate. She taught at St. Mary's High School in Calcutta from 1931 to 1948, until leaving the Loreto order to begin the Missionaries of Charity. Through her sisters, brothers, and priests, her service of the poorest of the poor spread all around the world. She won many awards, including the 1979 Nobel Peace Prize. After her death in 1997, the process for her sainthood was quickly begun and she was beatified in 2003.

FR. BRIAN KOLODIEJCHUK, M.C., Ph.D., was born in Winnipeg, Canada. He met Mother Teresa in 1977 and was associated with her until her death in 1997. He joined the Missionaries of Charity Fathers at the time of their foundation in 1984. Fr. Brian is postulator of the Cause of Beatification and Canonization of Mother Teresa of Calcutta and director of the Mother Teresa Center.

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Gloriamarie, August 31, 2007 (view all comments by Gloriamarie)
As of this moment, I cannot rate this book because I have yet to read it, although I am eager to study it. I would love to win a copy as I am an Episcopal nun and like Mother Theresa, under vows of poverty.

In a discussion of James Martin's op ed piece in the 8/29/07NYTimes, http://tinyurl.com/yqqkcp someone said to me

> Maybe she was clinically depressed or had some sort of >mental problem?

Possibly. That was my first thought, also. I was very impressed with what the reviewer said about her intention to offer up this darkness on behalf of the world. That's love and generosity.

What also impressed me is that although she lived in a dark night, her faith endured. I know what that's like. I've had long long dark nights myself and eventually I realized
God had gifted me with faith. Like Mother Theresa, I didn't have the "consolations of religion", as they are called, but the gift of faith which allowed me to continue to believe. I would guess this was Mother Theresa's experience. To me it only increases her witness and just another reason why she should be canonized.

My correspondent had other questions:

> God called her to work with the poorest of the poor but I >wonder if she had "times apart for rest and restoration"? >and maybe that calling of God was for a season not for the >rest of her life? I wonder if she could have had more >enlightened spiritual direction? I wonder if she spent so >much time labouring and not enough time in contemplative >prayer and worship?

These are some interesting questions. I wonder if we will have the answers from Mother Theresa's own words in other letters or from conversations with others. Although, of course, the Missionaries of Charity are an active order, not a contemplative one.

I confess I have a somewhat personal response to these questions as a result of my own forty-six year experience with Major Depressive Disorder.W hen I was in the grip of the Insidious Dark, other people were always trying to fix me. Their attempts were always based on what, in their opinion, I did wrongly, that it was my fault and that I
could change it if I only did x,y or z. I would try their suggestions and they wouldn't work. Eventually I realized with the help of my therapist that people did this because of the challenge I represented
to their own comfort zones.

So as I read the questions, I am reminded of all those
"Gloriamarie, if only you" or "Gloriamarie, why don't you" or
"Gloriamarie, you should". To me, Sandie's questions sound to me like " Mother Theresa, you should go on a vacation" when nuns in an order or community don;t go on vacation, they go on retreats. Or "Mother Theresa, don't you think you made a mistake and God didn't intend you to do this the rest of your life?" despite the impact of her life and work, the witness alone convinces me this was her true vocation. Or
"Mother Theresa, you should get a new spiritual director" etc.

Dark Nights are not a bad thing. The apophatic tradition, the Via Negativa, is a long established one and there are those over the centuries who have written quite movingly about the silence of God. In our more modern world, we seem to have come to view discomfort or suffering as a bad thing. Something to be avoided. Of course, as humans we will do everything we can to avoid it.

The witness of the great saints, though, among the things that make them "great" to me, is how they approached their suffering, what they did with it. While I am certain that for a while they, being human, tried to wiggle out of it as any of us would, there also came a time when they accepted it as part of the package of their lives. The darkness, the suffering was transformed.

Seems to me most of us today want to live surrounded by the warm fuzzies rather than go deeper, higher up, further in to that place where we risk the loss of all comfort zone. We think we can't bear the silence. What the great saints teach us, though, is that we must face that utter silence at the very core of our being because that is the God shaped hole within each of us and nothing but God fits, no matter what we stuff into it.

This is not to say that God wills all the suffering. I am of the
belief that we have trouble in our lives because we live in a sinful world and that there are consequences to the actions and decisions made. Not just the ones that we ourselves make but the ones of those who have gone before. An example: my nuclear family was dysfunctional probably because the nuclear families of my parents were dysfunctional as were theirs before them etc.

There are those who do what is right for no other reason than that it is right and with no other reward than that of knowing it is right. Somehow, it is the conviction of the rightness of their path that sustains them.

While I am certainly no saint, I said above that I've had my own struggles with the Insidious Dark. Decades of dark night had been preceded by a vision that I live my life within God's cupped hands. Throughout those decades, I'd think back to that vision. No great warm comforting feelings accompanied the memory. I had only the truth that I had this vision and the memory of the conviction that came with the vision that whatever else happened to me, I live my life in God's cupped hands.

Mother Theresa's letters tell us that she clearly heard God telling her to go and work with the poor. While I don't begin to compare myself to her, I do know what it is like to have the memory of something that helps one keepin' on keepin' on doing the right thing.

My correspondent continues:

> What a shame that she lacked joy, seems like she could >show the love of Jesus but not the joy, not the vibrant >faith, not the fullness of life, and not the peace.

Why is that a shame? How can one show the love of Jesus' without knowing it? The New Testament teaches us that the Holy Spirit works within in a manner that is far beyond our comprehension. I think Mother Theresa trusted that dynamic within her.

She offered that darkness on behalf of the poor, by it she identified with the poor, by it she experienced what the poor experienced. Possibly she carried the sufferings of those to weak to carry it for themselves?

We Christians are the Body of Christ, the body has different parts and needs everyone one of them. Instead of looking at what Mother Theresa lacked and judge her for it, let's instead look at what she did, an instrument of God's mercy and righteousness that is the witness of her life. Perhaps it was necessary that she experience what she did because that was what motivated her efforts? Let us commend her for her selflessness. She could have run away from the silence as so many of us do to look for anything whatsoever to fill up that silence and refusing to admit that there is nothing that will ever fill it up. Mother Theresa endured the silence, I am convinced, because she knew that nothing but God would ever fill it.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780385520379
Author:
Kolodiejchuk, Brian
Publisher:
Image
Author:
Mother Teresa, Teresa
Author:
Teresa, Mother
Author:
Teresa
Author:
Various
Author:
Mother Teresa with Brian Kolodiejchuk
Subject:
Christian Life
Subject:
Catholic church
Subject:
Institutions & Organizations
Subject:
Christianity - Catholic
Subject:
Christian Life - Inspirational - Catholic
Subject:
Christian life -- Catholic authors.
Subject:
Teresa
Subject:
Catholicism
Subject:
Catechisms
Subject:
Christianity-Inspirational
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20090317
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
12.25 x 9 x 7 in 14.46 lb

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Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light Used Hardcover
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$9.50 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Doubleday Books - English 9780385520379 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The legendary Mother Teresa's work for--and among--the poor has become the yardstick by which the entire world measures compassion, generosity, and selflessness. Her words and actions have inspired millions of people from every race and religion and country to help the poor and needy, a legacy that is her gift to all mankind for generations to come.

From 1950, when she founded the order of Missionaries of Charity, to winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979, and then, in 1985, being awarded the Medal of Freedom--the United States' highest civilian award--to her final days, Mother Teresa served the world as a beacon shedding the light of hope, comfort, and peace on all.

"Mother Teresa: In My Own Words" is a timeless testament to the power of her words. Here are the same quotes, stories, and prayers that helped strengthen and inspire the poor, the dying, the suffering, and the doubting who she met during her lifetime, and that will continue to strengthen and inspire all who read them.

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