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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

Red Water

by

Red Water Cover

 

Staff Pick

This eerie historical novel provides an insightful glimpse into a brutal chapter of pioneer history told through three of the nineteen devoted wives of John D. Lee. Needing closure of the event that took place on September 11, 1857 — when Mormon settlers and Indian allies escorted some 140 Arkansas emigrants away from their wagons and massacred all but 17 children under 7 — John D. Lee was scapegoated and executed 20 years later. He stood up for his faith and his principles and climbed into his coffin ready to meet his redeemer.
Recommended by Donna, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 1857, at a place called Mountain Meadows in southern Utah, a band of Mormons and Indians massacred 120 emigrants. Twenty years later, the slaughter was blamed on one man named John D. Lee, previously a member of Brigham Young’s inner circle. Red Water imagines Lee’s extraordinary frontier life through the eyes of three of his nineteen wives. Emma is a vigorous and capable Englishwoman who loves her husband unconditionally. Ann, a bride at thirteen years old, is an independent adventurer. Rachel is exceedingly devout and married Lee to be with her sister, his first wife. These spirited women describe their struggle to survive Utah’s punishing landscape and the poisonous rivalries within their polygamous family, led by a magnetic, industrious, and considerate husband, who was also unafraid of using his faith to justify desire and ambition.

Review:

"Freeman's novel is well researched...and her nuanced, perceptive portrayal of Mormon life stands in stark contrast to other Mormon-themed fiction....[H]istorically faithful, character-driven and deeply poignant." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Freeman weaves a tale of rare passion and color....Freeman's vivid and dramatic story, which implicates even Brigham Young in the horrid deeds, deserves high praise for its artistry but deep dubiety as to its reliability." Bryce Christensen, Booklist

Review:

"A subtle and powerful, if incomplete, indictment..." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"An unforgettable portrait of the unceasing labor, passion and danger of frontier life, recalling the best of Willa Cather." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Freeman presents ravishing visions of the land, which becomes as much a character in her drama as the people she so vividly conjures....Gorgeous and galvanizing." Newsday

Review:

"[C]ompelling, vivid writing that is both compassionate and unflinching; Freeman has gotten under the skin of these three very different women and their milieu in a profoundly affecting way." The Seattle Times

Review:

"[R]evelatory....[C]reates a vivid, believable picture of the high religious fervor and red-dust-covered hardships of the Utah frontier." O, The Oprah Magazine

Review:

"Freeman renders the terrible beauty of this land and the flinty resolve of these people with great skill." The Washington Post

Review:

"Captures the mayhem of America's westward expansion....An evocative tale of religious brutality and pioneer hardship set against an unforgiving landscape." Chicago Tribune

Review:

"Intense, charged with real feeling and electricity....Intelligent, complex prose will give readers a chance to reflect on the deeper meanings of love and faith and endurance." The Oregonian

Review:

"Engrossing....Freeman eschews the tributaries of contemporary domestic life for the deeper and darker lake of the past....Unforgettable." St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Review:

"The narrative soars...makes astute points about the almost indistinguishable similarities between faith and love." The New Yorker

Review:

"A powerful novel whose three narrators engage us so completely that we absorb their intricate history effortlessly." BookPage

Review:

"Such grim material is transformed by Freeman into a rich panoply of voices....Freeman creates a credible portrait of the hardships and rewards for women in a plural marriage." June Unjoo Yang, The Houston Chronicle

Synopsis:

In 1857, at a place called Mountain Meadows in southern Utah, a band of Mormons and Indians massacred 120 emigrants. Twenty years later, the slaughter was blamed on one man named John D. Lee, previously a member of Brigham Youngs inner circle. Red Water imagines Lees extraordinary frontier life through the eyes of three of his nineteen wives. Emma is a vigorous and capable Englishwoman who loves her husband unconditionally. Ann, a bride at thirteen years old, is an independent adventurer. Rachel is exceedingly devout and married Lee to be with her sister, his first wife. These spirited women describe their struggle to survive Utahs punishing landscape and the poisonous rivalries within their polygamous family, led by a magnetic, industrious, and considerate husband, who was also unafraid of using his faith to justify desire and ambition.

About the Author

Judith Freeman is the author of three previous novels — The Chinchilla Farm, Set for Life, and A Desert of Pure Feeling — and of Family Attractions, a collection of stories. She lives in California with her husband, the photographer Anthony Hernandez.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385720694
Author:
Freeman, Judith
Publisher:
Anchor Books
Location:
New York
Subject:
Christian Life
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Utah
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Mormons
Subject:
Mountain meadows massacre, 1857
Subject:
Inspirational fiction
Subject:
Christian fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
108-35
Publication Date:
April 8, 2003
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.06x5.32x.77 in. .55 lbs.

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Red Water Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$2.50 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Anchor (UK) - English 9780385720694 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

This eerie historical novel provides an insightful glimpse into a brutal chapter of pioneer history told through three of the nineteen devoted wives of John D. Lee. Needing closure of the event that took place on September 11, 1857 — when Mormon settlers and Indian allies escorted some 140 Arkansas emigrants away from their wagons and massacred all but 17 children under 7 — John D. Lee was scapegoated and executed 20 years later. He stood up for his faith and his principles and climbed into his coffin ready to meet his redeemer.

"Review" by , "Freeman's novel is well researched...and her nuanced, perceptive portrayal of Mormon life stands in stark contrast to other Mormon-themed fiction....[H]istorically faithful, character-driven and deeply poignant."
"Review" by , "Freeman weaves a tale of rare passion and color....Freeman's vivid and dramatic story, which implicates even Brigham Young in the horrid deeds, deserves high praise for its artistry but deep dubiety as to its reliability."
"Review" by , "A subtle and powerful, if incomplete, indictment..."
"Review" by , "An unforgettable portrait of the unceasing labor, passion and danger of frontier life, recalling the best of Willa Cather."
"Review" by , "Freeman presents ravishing visions of the land, which becomes as much a character in her drama as the people she so vividly conjures....Gorgeous and galvanizing."
"Review" by , "[C]ompelling, vivid writing that is both compassionate and unflinching; Freeman has gotten under the skin of these three very different women and their milieu in a profoundly affecting way."
"Review" by , "[R]evelatory....[C]reates a vivid, believable picture of the high religious fervor and red-dust-covered hardships of the Utah frontier."
"Review" by , "Freeman renders the terrible beauty of this land and the flinty resolve of these people with great skill."
"Review" by , "Captures the mayhem of America's westward expansion....An evocative tale of religious brutality and pioneer hardship set against an unforgiving landscape."
"Review" by , "Intense, charged with real feeling and electricity....Intelligent, complex prose will give readers a chance to reflect on the deeper meanings of love and faith and endurance."
"Review" by , "Engrossing....Freeman eschews the tributaries of contemporary domestic life for the deeper and darker lake of the past....Unforgettable."
"Review" by , "The narrative soars...makes astute points about the almost indistinguishable similarities between faith and love."
"Review" by , "A powerful novel whose three narrators engage us so completely that we absorb their intricate history effortlessly."
"Review" by , "Such grim material is transformed by Freeman into a rich panoply of voices....Freeman creates a credible portrait of the hardships and rewards for women in a plural marriage."
"Synopsis" by , In 1857, at a place called Mountain Meadows in southern Utah, a band of Mormons and Indians massacred 120 emigrants. Twenty years later, the slaughter was blamed on one man named John D. Lee, previously a member of Brigham Youngs inner circle. Red Water imagines Lees extraordinary frontier life through the eyes of three of his nineteen wives. Emma is a vigorous and capable Englishwoman who loves her husband unconditionally. Ann, a bride at thirteen years old, is an independent adventurer. Rachel is exceedingly devout and married Lee to be with her sister, his first wife. These spirited women describe their struggle to survive Utahs punishing landscape and the poisonous rivalries within their polygamous family, led by a magnetic, industrious, and considerate husband, who was also unafraid of using his faith to justify desire and ambition.
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