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Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950

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Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The civil rights movement that loomed over the 1950s and 1960s was the tip of an iceberg, the legal and political remnant of a broad, raucous, deeply American movement for social justice that flourished from the 1920s through the 1940s. This contentious mix of home-grown radicals, labor activists, newspaper editors, black workers, and intellectuals employed every strategy imaginable to take Dixie down, from a ludicrous attempt to organize black workers with a stage production of Pushkin'"in Russian'"to the courageous fight of striking workers against police and corporate violence in Gastonia in 1929. In a dramatic narrative Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore deftly shows how the movement unfolded against national and global developments, gaining focus and finally arriving at a narrow but effective legal strategy for securing desegregation and political rights. Little-known heroes abound in a book that will recast our understanding of the most important social movement in twentieth-century America.

Review:

"Willful amnesia has been a chronic problem in American historical thought. Many of us, it seems, have preferred a simplified and sanitized version of national history, one that smooths out the rough edges that might complicate comforting visions of harmony and progress. This mythic approach to the past was especially popular during the two decades following World War II, when patterns of violence,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Book News Annotation:

Gilmore (history, Yale) is a native of South Carolina who specializes in Southern history. In this book she traces the roots of the Civil Rights movement in the South. She begins just after World War I as the communist movement encouraged black Southerners and their allies to fight for legal and social equality. She chronicles both the joy and disappointment felt by many of those who traveled to Russia to experience this equality. Some of the participants, like poet Langston Hughes, are well known. Others, like John Owens, the first African-American sent south to organize unions, deserve to be. Especially fascinating is Pauli Murray, who fought prejudice against race and sexual preference. Blending stories of individuals with the history of the fight for racial equality through the Depression and rise of fascism in America as well as overseas, World War II and the Cold War, Gilmore honors those people of all races who struggled. Her well-written study reminds us that those who fought for civil rights were fighting for human rights, as well. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

A groundbreaking history of the Southern movement for social justice that gave birth to civil rights.

Synopsis:

The civil rights movement that looms over the 1950s and 1960s was the tip of an iceberg, the legal and political remnant of a broad, raucous, deeply American movement for social justice that flourished from the 1920s through the 1940s. This rich history of that early movement introduces us to a contentious mix of home-grown radicals, labor activists, newspaper editors, black workers, and intellectuals who employed every strategy imaginable to take Dixie down. In a dramatic narrative Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore deftly shows how the movement unfolded against national and global developments, gaining focus and finally arriving at a narrow but effective legal strategy for securing desegregation and political rights.

Synopsis:

The civil rights movement that loomed over the 1950s and 1960s was the tip of an iceberg, the legal and political remnant of a broad, raucous, deeply American movement for social justice that flourished from the 1920s through the 1940s. This contentious mix of home-grown radicals, labor activists, newspaper editors, black workers, and intellectuals employed every strategy imaginable to take Dixie down, from a ludicrous attempt to organize black workers with a stage production of Pushkin--in Russian--to the courageous fight of striking workers against police and corporate violence in Gastonia in 1929. In a dramatic narrative Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore deftly shows how the movement unfolded against national and global developments, gaining focus and finally arriving at a narrow but effective legal strategy for securing desegregation and political rights. Little-known heroes abound in a book that will recast our understanding of the most important social movement in twentieth-century America.

About the Author

Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore is the Peter V. and C. Vann Woodward Professor of History at Yale University. A North Carolina native, she writes extensively on Southern history. She and her family live in New Haven, Connecticut.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393062441
Author:
Gilmore, Glenda Eliz
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Gilmore, Glenda Elizabeth
Author:
Gilmore, Glenda E.
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Civil Rights
Subject:
United States - State & Local - South
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Civil Rights
Subject:
Southern States Politics and government.
Subject:
Southern States Race relations History.
Subject:
African American Studies-Black Heritage
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
January 2008
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
656
Dimensions:
9.6 x 6.5 x 1.8 in 2.305 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » Civil Rights Movement
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950 Used Hardcover
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$9.95 In Stock
Product details 656 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393062441 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A groundbreaking history of the Southern movement for social justice that gave birth to civil rights.
"Synopsis" by , The civil rights movement that looms over the 1950s and 1960s was the tip of an iceberg, the legal and political remnant of a broad, raucous, deeply American movement for social justice that flourished from the 1920s through the 1940s. This rich history of that early movement introduces us to a contentious mix of home-grown radicals, labor activists, newspaper editors, black workers, and intellectuals who employed every strategy imaginable to take Dixie down. In a dramatic narrative Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore deftly shows how the movement unfolded against national and global developments, gaining focus and finally arriving at a narrow but effective legal strategy for securing desegregation and political rights.

"Synopsis" by , The civil rights movement that loomed over the 1950s and 1960s was the tip of an iceberg, the legal and political remnant of a broad, raucous, deeply American movement for social justice that flourished from the 1920s through the 1940s. This contentious mix of home-grown radicals, labor activists, newspaper editors, black workers, and intellectuals employed every strategy imaginable to take Dixie down, from a ludicrous attempt to organize black workers with a stage production of Pushkin--in Russian--to the courageous fight of striking workers against police and corporate violence in Gastonia in 1929. In a dramatic narrative Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore deftly shows how the movement unfolded against national and global developments, gaining focus and finally arriving at a narrow but effective legal strategy for securing desegregation and political rights. Little-known heroes abound in a book that will recast our understanding of the most important social movement in twentieth-century America.
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